KC35 Media Ecology Translated into Italian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#35: Media Ecology, which Casey Man Kong Lum wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Alessia Maselli has now translated into Italian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC35 Media Ecology_Italian

Lum, C. M. K. (2019). Ecologia dei Media. (A. Maselli, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 35. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/kc35-media-ecology_italian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Urban Foodways & Communication

Lum, C. M. K., & de Ferrière le Vayer, M. (Eds.). (2016). Urban foodways and communication: Ethnographic studies in intangible cultural food heritages around the world. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Lum coverEmbedded in the quest for ways to preserve and promote heritage of any kind and, in particular, food heritage, is an appreciation or a sense of an impending loss of a particular way of life – knowledge, skills set, traditions — deemed vital to the survival of a culture or community. Foodways places the production, procurement, preparation and sharing or consumption of food at an intersection among culture, tradition, and history. Thus, foodways is an important material and symbolic marker of identity, race and ethnicity, gender, class, ideology and social relations.

Urban Foodways and Communication seeks to enrich our understanding of unique foodways in urban settings around the world as forms of intangible cultural heritage. Each ethnographic case study focuses its analysis on how the featured foodways manifests itself symbolically through and in communication. The book helps advance our knowledge of urban food heritages in order to contribute to their appreciation, preservation, and promotion.

To apply for a 30% reduction in the price of the book prior to June 17, 2017, contact Casey Lum directly.

Table of Contents:

At the Intersection of Urban Foodways, Communication, and Intangible Cultural Heritage: An Introduction – Casey Man Kong Lum and Marc de Ferrière le Vayer

Bacalhau–A Love Story: An Ethnographic Study of Portuguese Foodways – paula arvela

Kimchi Nation: Constructing Kimjang as an Intangible Korean Heritage – Chi-Hoon Kim

The Lebanese Bigarade: A Tree at the Heart of Urban Foodways – Aïda Kanafani-Zahar

Shark Town: Kesennuma’s Taste for Shark and the Challenge of a Tsunami – Jun Akamine

The Story in My Matzah Ball Soup: Food as Memory, Identity, and Culture in Contemporary Jewish Barcelona – Catherine Simone Gallin

Gastronomic Festivals and Celebrations on the Montenegrin Coast: Promoting Multicultural Heritage through Traditional Foodways – Ivona Jovanović, Andriela Vitić-Ćetković, and Charles A. Baker-Clark

FIFA vs. As Baianas de Acarajé and the Politics of the Cultural Imaginary – Scott Alves Barton

Edible Heritage: Tradition, Health, and Ephemeral Consumption Spaces in Mexican Street Food – José Antonio Vázquez-Medina, Miriam Bertrán, and F. Xavier Medina

Botteghe Storiche: A Study of the Disappearance of Historic Food Shops and Its Role in the Transformation of Rome’s Urban Social Life – Sonia Massari, Elena T. Carbone, and Salem Paulos

Urban Melting Pot: Food Heritage in Yakutia – Isabelle Bianquis and Isabella Borissova

Epilogue: Urban Foodways as Communication and as Intangible Cultural Heritage – Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz

Key Concept #35: Media Ecology by Casey Man Kong Lum

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is  KC35: Media Ecology by Casey Man Kong Lum. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc35-sm

Lum, C. M. K. (2019). Media ecology. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 35. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/kc35-media-ecology-rev.pdf

(NOTE: this was originally published in 2014, but revised in 2019 – the revised PDF is what is now available.)

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Urban Foodways and Communication

Urban Foodways

Call for Chapter Proposals for a New Book
Urban Foodways and Communication: Ethnographic Studies in Intangible Cultural Food Heritages Around the World

Chapter Proposal Submission Deadline: November 15, 2014

Editors:
Casey Man Kong Lum, William Paterson University, USA, and
Marc de Ferriere le Vayer, the UNESCO Chair Project on Safeguarding and Promoting Cultural Food Heritage, the University of Tours, France

Book Overview:
Embedded in the quest for ways to preserve and promote heritage of any kind is an appreciation or a sense of an impending loss of a particular way of life – knowledge, skills set, traditions — deemed vital to the survival of a culture. Foodways places the production, procurement, preparation and sharing or consumption of food at an intersection among culture, tradition, and history. Thus, foodways is an important material and symbolic marker of identity, race and ethnicity, gender, class, ideology and social relations.

Intangible cultural heritage, according to the 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, refers to “the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, skills – as well as the instruments, objects, artefacts and cultural spaces associated therewith – that communities, groups and, in some cases, individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage. This intangible cultural heritage, transmitted from generation to generation, is constantly recreated by communities and groups in response to their environment, their interaction with nature and their history, and provides them with a sense of identity and continuity, thus promoting respect for cultural diversity and human creativity.”

Urban Foodways and Communication seeks to enrich our understanding of unique foodways in urban settings around the world as forms of intangible cultural heritage. Each ethnographic case study is expected to focus its analysis on how the featured foodways manifests itself symbolically through and in communication. The proposed volume aims to help advance our knowledge of urban food heritages in order to contribute to their appreciation, preservation, and promotion. We invite chapter proposals from scholars from all geographic and cultural regions of the world, and are particularly interested in attracting scholars from diverse disciplinary backgrounds to write ethnographic case studies of distinctly identifiable foodways that they consider worthy of examination as intangible cultural heritage.

Submission Guidelines:
While the definition of intangible cultural heritage by the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage provides a good general conceptual framework, interested colleagues are encouraged to contribute their most current research and interpretation to substantiate, augment, or otherwise advance our understanding in this area of academic inquiry.

What to submit:
All submissions must include two documents, a Chapter Proposal and a separate CV of no more than three pages. The Chapter Proposal must contain (a) a working title of the proposed chapter, (b) an 800 to 1,000-word exposition consisting of a clear description of the proposed ethnographic case study and a concise statement on how and why the foodways being examined can be regarded as a form of intangible cultural heritage, and (c) a one to two-page annotated outline of the proposed chapter. Please do not identify yourself in any way in the Chapter Proposal. Include in your submission a separate CV of no more than three pages. All submissions will go through a referee process by a review committee established in conjunction with the UNESCO Chair Project on Safeguarding and Promoting Cultural Food Heritage at the University of Tours, France.

Submission format:
All submissions must be written in English and prepared in accordance with the style of the sixth edition of the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual. Please submit your documents in the MS Word file format.

Submission deadline (and contact person for inquiry):
Please send your Chapter Proposal and CV in the same email on or before November 15, 2014 (Eastern Time) to: Casey Lum
Notification of acceptance status of chapter proposals: December 15, 2014
Submission deadline of complete chapters: on or before April 15, 2015

Length of each complete chapter manuscript:
Each complete chapter manuscript must be between 5,000 and (no more than) 5,500 words, inclusive of the main text and References. The use of the 12-point Times New Roman font in MS Word is preferred.

Casey Man Kong Lum Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesCasey Man Kong Lum (Ph.D., NYU) is currently Professor of Communication at William Paterson University (New Jersey, USA), where he is the Founding Director of the M.A. in Professional Communication Program (2007-2012).

Casey Lum

His research intersects among media ecology, food studies, urban foodways as intangible cultural heritage, urban communication, transnational communication in the diaspora, global media, the Chinese American experience, intercultural education and communication, multilingual education, intellectual history of communication scholarship, etc. Casey has had extensive experience in intercultural consultancy and study abroad programs (e.g., global food cultures, media and globalization, intercultural and multilingual education).

Sample publications:

Books:

林文刚编:《媒介环境学:思想沿革与多维视野》, 第二版,何道宽译,北京:中国大百科全书出版社,2019 年。[The is the second simplified Chinese translation edition of Lum (2006) by the Encyclopedia of China Publishing House, Beijing.]

Lum, C. M. K., & de Ferrière le Vayer, M. (Eds.). (2016). Urban foodways and communication: Ethnographic studies in intangible cultural food heritages around the world. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Lum, C. M. K. (2006). (Ed.). Perspectives on culture, technology, and communication: The media ecology tradition. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press. [Winner, Lewis Mumford Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Technics, The Media Ecology Association, 2006]. This book has been translated and published in simplified Chinese by Peking University Press in Beijing, China (2007); in Korean by Hannarae Publishing Company in Seoul, South Korea (2008); in traditional Chinese by Chu Liu Publishing Company in Taipei, Taiwan (2010).

Lum, C. M. K. (1996). In search of a voice: Karaoke and the construction of identity in Chinese America. Foreword by N. Postman. London: Routledge.

Articles and Book Chapters:

Lum, C.  M. K. (2019). Media ecology and media education: Reflections on media literacy in a globalized communication ecology [in Chinese]. Chinese Journal of Journalism and Communication, 41(4), 89-108. 林文刚: 媒介环境学和媒体教育: 反思全球化传播生态中的媒体素养, 《国际新闻界》, 2019年4月 (41卷 4期): 89-108.

Lum, C. M. K. (2018). Developing intercultural competence in the language classroom. In J. Liontas (Ed.) (Vol Ed.: S. Nero). The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching, Vol. VI (pp. 3545-3550). Oxford, UK: Wiley. DOI: 10.1002/9781118784235.eelt0282

Lum, C. M. K. (2015). Regionalism and communication: Voices from the Chinese diaspora. In A. Gonzalez & Y.-W. Chen (Eds.), Our voices: Essays in culture, ethnicity, and communication (pp. 327-334, 6th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Lum, C. M. K. (2014). Media ecology: Contexts, concepts, and currents. In R. Fortner & M. Fackler (Eds.), The handbook in media and mass communication theory (pp. 137-153, Vol. 1). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. (Winner: The 2016 Walter Benjamin Award for Outstanding Article in the Field of Media Ecology.)

Lum, C. M. K. (2013). Understanding urban foodways and communicative cities: A taste of Hong Kong’s yumcha culture as urban communication. In S. Drucker, V. Gallenger, & M. Matsaganis (Eds.), The urban communication reader III: Communicative cities and urban communication in the 21st century (pp. 53-76). New York: Peter Lang.

Lum, C. M. K. (2006). Communicating Chinese heritage in America: A study of bicultural education across generations. In W. Leeds-Hurwitz (Ed.), From generation to generation: Maintaining cultural identity over rime (pp. 75-98). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Lum, C. M. K., & Haratonik, P. L. (2011). A comparative study of Xintiandi in Shanghai and South Street Seaport in New York City [in Chinese]. In F. Sun & J. Yang (Eds.), Tales of two cities: Urban culture in Shanghai and New York City (pp. 44-57). Shanghai, China: Truth & Wisdom Press and Shanghai People’s Publishing.

Currently on the Board of Directors of the Urban Communication Foundation, Casey has been actively serving the profession in various leadership capacities, such as:

Casey serves as a reviewer and on the editorial board of a number of refereed journals. He is a long-time resident of New York City.