KC62: Diaspora Translated into Simplified Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#62: Diaspora, which Jolanta A. Drzewiecka published in English in 2015, which Min He has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC62 Diaspora_Chinese-simDrzewiecka, J. A. (2017). Diaspora [Simplified Chinese]. (M. He, Trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 62. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/kc62-diaspora_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC62: Diaspora Translated into Turkish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting  KC62: Diaspora, first published in English in 2015 by Jolanta Drzewiecka, which Kenan Çetinkaya has now translated into Turkish. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC62 Diaspora-TurkishDrzewiecka, J. (2017). Diaspora [Turkish]. (K. Çetinkaya, trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 62. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/kc62-diaspora-turkish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Jolanta A. Drzewiecka Researcher Profile

Jolanta Drzewiecka Jolanta A. Drzewiecka is Senior Assistant Professor and Intercultural Communication Chair at the Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland.  Visiting Professor, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland (Fall, 2015)

My research centers on construction of cultural, racial, and national differences in discourse.  I am particularly interested in contexts of systemic collapse and transition, regional and global integration, and rescaling of government. I focus on two areas: negotiation of belonging and public memories.

 

Immigrant identity: incorporation and representation

My work examines how immigrants negotiate identities and are represented by media.  I am developing  an innovative way of understanding how immigrants are incorporated within racial hierarchies that perpetuate domination and inequality (Drzewiecka & Steyn, 2009; Drzewiecka  & Steyn, 2012; Pande & Drzewiecka, under review).  With my South African collaborator, Melissa Steyn, I proposed a framework of incorporation as discursive intercultural translation based on a study of how Polish immigrants are incorporated racially within the distinct South African racial regionalism (Drzewiecka & Steyn, 2009).  We theorize translation as a creative and strategic process of meaning integration that results in immigrants’ reframing themselves to bid for inclusion and belonging in their new place.  Our concept of translation is based in postcolonial theory and highlights the complex processes whereby immigrants understand and connect new meanings and position themselves within racial hierarchies.  We extended this work to theorise how the symbolic and the material are inseparably interlaced to form immigrant identities (Drzewiecka & Steyn, 2012).   We demonstrated that Polish immigrants were incorporated and incorporated themselves in ways that supported continuing white domination in cultural, institutional and economic structures.  The most recent project extends the concept of racial incorporation by connecting identity capital and emotions to negotiation of belonging.

I also explore representations of immigrants in newspapers.  A recent paper examines how Polish post-EU accession migrants are represented in British newspapers (Drzewiecka, Hoops & Thomas, 2014).  We zero in on the role of media in legitimating the changing scales of government as well as precarious citizenship in representations of migrants in the European Union.  This is a rich area for application;  a follow up study examines the US immigration reform debate focusing on how citizenship and rights are shaped by the state adjusting to globalizing conditions (Drzewiecka, Pande & Saurbier, 2014).

Public memories

Another productive line of research centers on public memories, particularly those of racist violence.  In a recent project, I demonstrated through a psychoanalytic reading how knowledge of the past antisemitic violence has been blocked and the victims rendered unrecognisable to protect the fictions of the Polish gentile self (Drzewiecka, 2014).  Another paper examines the discourses of historical wound in media and how they are shaped and shape relations with the other. My current book project extends the psychoanalytical rhetorical approach to understand how memories of racial others recuperate and purify the nation in response to ongoing and new global challenges to national purity and exclusivity. Further, I am co-editing (with Susan A. Owen and Peter Ehrenhaus) a special issue of the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication on public memories, culture and difference.  The issue is scheduled for publication in 2016.

I had the pleasure of serving as the Chair of the International and Intercultural Communication Division of the National Communication Association, USA.

Selected publications

Hoops, J., Thomas, R., & Drzewiecka, J. A. (2015). Polish plumber as a pawn in the British newspaper discourse on Polish post-EU enlargement immigration to the U.K.  Journalism. Published online before print May 31, 2015, doi: 10.1177/1464884915585960.

Drzewiecka, J. A. (2014). Aphasia and a legacy of violence: disabling and enabling knowledge of the past in Poland. Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, 11, 362-381.

Drzewiecka, J. A., Hoops, J., & Thomas, R. (2014). Rescaling the state and disciplining workers in discourses on EU Polish migration in UK newspapers. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 31, 410-425.

Drzewiecka, J. A., & Steyn, M. (2012). Racial immigrant incorporation: material-symbolic articulation of identities. Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 5, 1-19.

Drzewiecka, J. A., & Steyn, M. (2009). Discourses of exoneration in intercultural translation: Polish immigrants in South Africa. Communication Theory, 19, 188-218.

Key Concept #62: Diaspora by Jolanta A. Drzewiecka

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Key Concept #62: Diaspora by Jolanta DrzewieckaDrzewiecka, J. A. (2015). Diaspora. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 62. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/key-concept-diaspora.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #56: Racial Incorporation by Jolanta Drzewiecka

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Key Concept #56 Racial Incorporation by Jolanta Drzewiecka

Drzewiecka. J. A. (2015). Racial incorporation. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 56. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/key-concept-racial-incorporation.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.