Howard J of Communications: Special Issue Proposals Solicited

“PublicationCall for proposals of future special issues of Howard Journal of Communications. Deadline: none given; request posted 29 August 2022.

The Howard Journal of Communications calls for submission of proposals for special issues. The journal plans to publish special issues annually. Each issue shall include manuscripts that are selected through a competitive process and undergo review via the journal’s database of reviewers. Senior scholars, who have published multiple pieces in refereed journals, are invited to submit proposals for special issue(s). Key requirements for submitting a proposal include the following:

– Must be a published senior scholar in the journal’s interest.
– Must be involved in securing contributors to a special issue that you propose.
– The proposal must provide a compelling argument for the importance of the communication issue to the journal’s audience at this time.
– Provide a draft call for papers in your designated special issue area.
– An outline timetable for delivering the special issue.
– Your proposal should identify possible contributors to the special issue.

Submit your proposal to Chukwuka Onwumechili.

CFP Howard J of Communications: Intersectionality

“PublicationCall for articles: Special Issue of Howard Journal of CommunicationsInvestigating Intersectionality in Communication. Deadline: 30 September 2022.

Kimberlé Crenshaw, a few decades ago, conceptualized the term intersectionality to vividly argue the impact of a person’s multiple and interacting social identities on how they are treated by others. For communication scholars, it exposed the insufficiency and inadequacy of work that focus on studying single variables and it alerted us to the need to incorporate the effects of multiple embedded variables during communication. For instance, the fact that one is a woman, African American, and lesbian and/or living with a disability may interactively impact her status within society and the effects of how others communicate with her. This complexity identifies the realism of life. Although, Crenshaw coined the term intersectionality in 1989 and it was added to the Oxford Dictionary in 2015. Although the concept is increasingly discussed in academic literature, it is not yet fully explored and understood.

Therefore, the Howard Journal of Communications calls on scholars to submit manuscript for a special issue intended to deeply explore intersectionality within the field of communication as it pertains to African American social conditions. This call provides a wide range of choices for exploring communication and social conditions with the central theme of intersectionality. Submissions should be, preferably, research-based, and no more than 10,000 characters (including references) long. Suggested themes are listed as follows.

– Reconceptualizing identity in intersectionality
– Intersectional rhetoric
– Intersectionality: Theory or praxis?
– Research methods for exploring intersectionality
– Intersectionality critique
– Re-examining historical scholarship in communication and intersectionality
– Communication technologies and intersectional issues
– Other possible topics

CFP Investigating Intersectionality in Communication

“PublicationCall for articles: Special Issue of Howard Journal of Communications: Investigating Intersectionality in Communication.  Deadline: 30  September 2022.

Special Issue Editor: Chuka Onwumechili, Howard University

Kimberlé Crenshaw, a few decades ago, conceptualized the term intersectionality to vividly argue the impact of a person’s multiple and interacting social identities on how they are treated by others. For communication scholars, it exposed the insufficiency and inadequacy of work that focus on studying single variables and it alerted us to the need to incorporate the effects of multiple embedded variables during communication. For instance, the fact that one is a woman, African American, and lesbian and/or living with a disability may interactively impact her status within society and the effects of how others communicate with her. This complexity identifies the realism of life. Although, Crenshaw coined the term intersectionality in 1989 and it was added to the Oxford Dictionary in 2015. Although the concept is increasingly discussed in academic literature, it is not yet fully explored and understood.

Therefore, the Howard Journal of Communications calls on scholars to submit manuscript for a special issue intended to deeply explore intersectionality within the field of communication as it pertains to African American social conditions. This call provides a wide range of choices for exploring communication and social conditions with the central theme of intersectionality. Submissions should be, preferably, research-based, and no more than 10,000 characters (including references) long. Suggested themes are listed as follows.

  • Reconceptualizing identity in intersectionality
  • Intersectional rhetoric
  • Intersectionality: Theory or praxis?
  • Research methods for exploring intersectionality
  • Intersectionality critique
  • Re-examining historical scholarship in communication and intersectionality
  • Communication technologies and intersectional issues
  • Other possible topics

Howard J of Comm CFP

Call for Manuscripts
2012 Special Issue: Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication
Mark P. Orbe, Guest Editor
Submission Deadline: October 1, 2011

For years, The Howard Journal of Communications (a Taylor & Francis Group publication) has been recognized as a leading journal of scholarship that explores the inextricable relationship between culture and communication. More specifically, it has consistently featured cutting-edge research that brings the communicative experiences of underrepresented group members from the margins to the center of scholarly inquiry. The Howard Journal of Communications continues its commitment to this mission with a 2012 Special Issue dedicated to Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication.

Co-cultural communication refers to the diverse ways that traditionally underrepresented group members negotiate their cultural locations/standpoints in societies where dominant group experiences benefit from societal privilege and institutional power.  By definition, co-cultural communication research works diligently to increase understanding by exploring communication processes from the perspectives of underrepresented group members themselves. This special issue is interested in projects that work to advance the theorizing of co-cultural communication processes.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that explore co-cultural communication processes (based on race/ethnicity, nationality, socio-economic status, gender, disability, spirituality, sexual orientation, and the like) in diverse settings (interpersonal, organizational, small group, intercultural, and mass media). Manuscripts focusing on all forms of co-cultural communication and methodological frameworks are acceptable; however, preference will given to those authors whose work demonstrates how co-cultural understanding transcends the experiences of a single cultural group within a particular setting. Ultimately, the special issue seeks to produce a volume where communication scholars can draw from a variety of conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to advance existing knowledge of co-cultural communicative experiences.

The guest editor for the special issue is Mark P. Orbe, Western Michigan University, School of Communication, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI  49009; (269) 387-3132.  All manuscripts must be prepared in accordance to the 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and should contain no more than 7500 total words (including tables, references, endnotes, and appendices). An electronic file of the manuscript (including 200-word abstract), prepared for blind review as a WORD document, and a separate file with title of the manuscript, author contact information, brief author bio, key terms, and manuscript history (if applicable) should be submitted to orbe@wmich.edu AND hjcomm@gmail.com no later than October 1, 2011. Authors are strongly encouraged to review the “Information for Authors” prior to submitting manuscripts.

Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication

CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

The Howard Journal of Communications
2012 Special Issue: Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication Mark P. Orbe, Guest Editor Submission Deadline: October 1, 2011

For years, The Howard Journal of Communications (a Taylor & Francis Group publication) has been recognized as a leading journal of scholarship that explores the inextricable relationship between culture and communication. More specifically, it has consistently featured cutting-edge research that brings the communicative experiences of underrepresented group members from the margins to the center of scholarly inquiry. The Howard Journal of Communications continues its commitment to this mission with a 2012 Special Issue dedicated to Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication.

Co-cultural communication refers to the diverse ways that traditionally underrepresented group members negotiate their cultural locations/standpoints in societies where dominant group experiences benefit from societal privilege and institutional power.  By definition, co-cultural communication research works diligently to increase understanding by exploring communication processes from the perspectives of underrepresented group members themselves. This special issue is interested in projects that work to advance the theorizing of co-cultural communication processes.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that explore co-cultural communication processes (based on race/ethnicity, nationality, socio-economic status, gender, disability, spirituality, sexual orientation, and the like) in diverse settings (interpersonal, organizational, small group, intercultural, and mass media). Manuscripts focusing on all forms of co-cultural communication and methodological frameworks are acceptable; however, preference will given to those authors whose work demonstrates how co-cultural understanding transcends the experiences of a single cultural group within a particular setting. Ultimately, the special issue seeks to produce a volume where communication scholars can draw from a variety of conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to advance existing knowledge of co-cultural communicative experiences.

The guest editor for the special issue is Mark P. Orbe, Western Michigan University, School of Communication, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI  49009; (269) 387-3132.  All manuscripts must be prepared in accordance to the 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and should contain no more than 7500 total words (including tables, references, endnotes, and appendices). An electronic file of the manuscript (including 200-word abstract), prepared for blind review as a WORD document, and a separate file with title of the manuscript, author contact information, brief author bio, key terms, and manuscript history (if applicable) should be submitted to orbe@wmich.edu AND hjcomm@gmail.com no later than October 1, 2011. Authors are strongly encouraged to review the “Information for Authors” at http://tandf.msgfocus.com/c/15HCwfFS6aghFb2Xbc prior to submitting manuscripts.

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