KC22: Cultural Identity Translated into Hindi

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#22: Cultural Identity, which Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Nrupa Vyas has now translated into Hindi. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC22 Cultural Identity_HindiChen, V. H-H. (2017). Cultural identity [Hindi]. (N. Vyas, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 22. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/kc22-cultural-identity_hindi.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC22: Cultural Identity Translated into Portuguese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#22: Cultural Identity, which Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which John R. Baldwin and Fernando Silva have now translated into Portuguese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC22 Cultural Identity_PortugueseChen, V. H-H. (2017). Identidade cultural. (J. R. Baldwin & F. Silva, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 22. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc22-cultural-identity_portuguese.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #22: Cultural Identity Translated into Simplified Chinese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#22: Cultural identity, which Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Yan Qiu has now translated into Simplified Chinese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC22 Cultural Identity_Chinese-simChen, V. H.-H. (2017). Cultural identity [Simplified Chinese]. (Y. Qiu, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 22. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc22-cultural-identity_chinese-sim.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #22: Cultural Identity Translated into Japanese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#22: Cultural identity, which Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Akari Takenishi has now translated into Japanese. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC22 Cultural Identity_JapaneseChen, V. H.-H. (2017). Cultural identity [Japanese]. (A. Takenishi, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 22. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc22-cultural-identity_japanese.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Royal Roads University & Cultural Identity 2016

I spent July, August and September 2016 teaching a graduate seminar at Royal Roads University, located in Victoria, BC, Canada, as part of their Master of Arts in International and Intercultural Communication (MAIIC) for the second time (the first time was described a year ago). The course was Contemporary Issues in Communication: Cultural Identity. The 39 students came from China, Nigeria, India, France, Senegal/France, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Jordan, Brazil, the US, and Canada.

Near the end of the course, there was a banquet for students in the program, and many photos were taken, including one with those faculty, staff and administrators who were present. We took another the last day of class. None of these includes everyone.

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Students worked on a major course project on the social construction of migration in the public sphere. Each one looked at a different part of the story – I hope to upload some of their results in later posts.

While at RRU, I arranged for an intern for CID, Min He. She started her work as Assistant to the Director on October 3, 2016.

I also was asked to supervise a doctoral dissertation in Interdisciplinary Studies, and have started working with Liton Furukawa on her project. An international student herself, she will examine the transition international students make after graduation (when Canada offers them a 3 year residency permit) to being international workers.

My thanks to Juana Du, program head of the MAIIC, for again inviting me to her beautiful campus to work with an incredible group of students!

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue
intercult.dialogue[at]gmail.com

Cultural Identity at Royal Roads University

Across August, September, and October of 2015, I taught a graduate seminar at Royal Roads University, located in Victoria, BC, Canada, as part of their Master of Arts in International and Intercultural Communication (MAIIC). The course was Contemporary Issues in Communication: Cultural Identity. The 38 students enrolled were quite international, as they came from China, Ecuador, Bangladesh, Barbados, and Canada.

On the last day of class, several students asked for photos, so here’s one, although not everyone was present at the time. Imagine another dozen added to the group.

IICS 638 class photo 2015

Students prepared small papers on their own linguistic repertoires, examined the ways in which living rooms can display cultural identity, prepared group presentations on case studies about cultural identity. Their major assignments were either applied group projects, or individual papers. The group projects included:

• Hosting an intercultural competence workshop for students in the Pre-Masters Program at RRU
• Designing a brochure for Hainan Drive Travel Association to give to Chinese tourists to Victoria
• Preparing a videotape in collaboration with Indigenous Education & Student Services at RRU about the Lklungen (Songhees) Nation for their own use in public presentations
• Preparing a videotape documenting differences between Chinese dialects for use in teaching Chinese to English speakers
• Creating pre-departure orientation materials for the Office of Global Advancement to use in preparing students, staff and faculty for a trip to Ecuador.

While at RRU, I was asked to participate in a public conversation, Communication Matters: Immigration from an Intercultural Communication Perspective. Dr. Juana Du, program head of the on-campus version of the MAIIC, served as host. Other participants were Lisa Selvey and Jingya (Celine) Yang, two students from the course. Follow the link to get to the video, which is now available on YouTube.

One of the highlights of my time at RRU was being able to watch Tom LaFortune carve a totem pole for the campus, and then attending the unveiling ceremony.

I posted last year about the beautiful campus, but this time I lived on campus, with peacocks in the front yard and deer in the backyard, a Japanese garden, and 650 acres of trails available for exploration. A few new photos follow. My thanks to Professor Du for inviting me to her beautiful campus to work with a fascinating group of students!

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

p.s. In November, Crossroads, the RRU internal publication, just posted a notice about one of the student projects in the course.

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Hatice Sitki Researcher Profile

Hatice SitkiDr. Hatice Sitki is the founder and principal consultant of SERSA, National Myths and Symbols Consultancy. She has a Phd in Communication from Deakin University, as well as an MA and BA in Communication from the University of Canberra. Her research specializations include: semiotics, myths and symbols as they manifest in the following areas: branding national myths and symbols (BNMS) collective group identity/interactions; Europe/EU/Türkey; multiculturalism and polyculturalism, indigenous group identity, re-identitification of diasporas; and branding peace. Sitki has given presentations on: cultural identity of ASEAN;  cultural identity of Europe and EU; cultural identity of Türkey; Australian national identity; multiculturalism; cultural identity of Vancouver, Shanghai and Canberra; cultural sovereignty for Australian Indigenous Peoples; Peace studies; diplomatic cultural studies; how to achieve tourism, merchandising of national identity for profit and cultural inclusiveness. She is  founding President of SIETAR Australasia.

A selection of Hatice’s papers are below:

Sitki, H. ‘Time to celebrate city’s multicultural identity’ Canberra Times, Feb. 2013. www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/time-to-celebrate-citys-multicultural-identity-20130224-2ezra.html

Sitki, H. ‘Branding (inter) national myths and symbols for peace: How to meet your ‘other’ Türkey and Europe/EU’ Institute for Cultural Diplomacy, Ankara, Türkey 2012. http://www.culturaldiplomacy.org/academy/content/pdf/participant-papers/2012-04-ankara/Branding–international-myths-and-symbols-for-peace–How-to-meet-your-other-Tuerkey-and-Europe-EU–Dr-Hatice-Sitki.pdf

Sitki, H. ‘You Me Unity’ (Response). 2011. www.youmeunity.org.au/have-your-say/submission/2949

Sitki, H. ‘EU-Türkey: Atatürk and Charlemagne on your Euro notes’ Café Babel www.cafebabel.co.uk/article/36313/europe-turkey-symbols-charlemagne-ataturk-empires.html

Sitki, H. ‘Türkish Spring, Erdogan’s Winter’ Online Opinion, June 28 2013. www.onlineopinion.com.au/author.asp?id=7251

Michele Koven Researcher Profile

Michele KovenMichele Koven is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with courtesy appointments in the Departments of Anthropology. French, Global Studies, and the Center for Writing Studies.

Using ethnographic and discourse analytic approaches, her research interests include how people enact, infer, and evaluate images of social types in interaction. She is particularly interested in people’s interpretations and experiences of their own and others’ « identities » in multilingual contexts She has most extensively addressed these issues through the prism of oral storytelling among young people of Portuguese origin, raised in France. More recently, she has begun exploring these issues in social media.

Publications

In Press. Jaffe, Alexandra; Michele Koven, Sabina Perrino, and Cecile Vigouroux. Introduction to Special Issue of Language in Society. Heteroglossia, Performance, Power, and Participation.

In Press. Koven, Michele and Isabelle Simões Marques. Performing and Evaluating (Non)modernities of Portuguese Migrant Figures on YouTube: The Case of Antonio de Carglouch. Language in Society.

In Press. Koven, Michele. Narrative and Cultural Identities: Performing and Aligning with Figures of Personhood. To appear in Handbook of Narrative Analysis. Anna De Fina and Alexandra Georgakopolou (eds.) Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

2014. Koven, Michele. Interviewing: Practice, Ideology, Genre, and Intertextuality. Annual Review of Anthropology. Vol. 43.

2013. Koven, Michele. Antiracist, Modern Selves and Racist, Unmodern Others: Chronotopes of Modernity in Luso-descendants’ Race Talk. Language and Communication. 33/4, 544-558.

2013. Koven, Michele. Speaking French in Portugal: An Analysis of Contested Models of Emigrant Personhood in Narratives about Return Migration and Language Use. Journal of Sociolinguistics. 17(3)324-354.

2011. Koven, Michele. Speaker Role Analysis in Personal Narratives. In Varieties of Narrative Analysis. J. Holstein and J. Gubrium, (eds.) Thousand Oaks: Sage.

2011. Miller, Peggy.J.; Michele Koven, & Shumin Lin. Narrative Socialization. In Duranti, A. (ed.) Handbook on Language Socialization. Malden, MA: Basil Blackwell.

2011. Koven, Michele. Comparing Stories Told in the Sociolinguistic Interview and Spontaneous Conversation. Language in Society 40(1) 75-89.

2009. Koven, Michele. Managing Relationships and Identities through Forms of Address: What French-Portuguese Bilinguals Call their Parents in each Language. Language and Communication. 29(4): 343–365.

2007. Koven, Michele. Selves in Two Languages: Bilinguals’ Verbal Enactments of Identity in French and Portuguese. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (Reviewed in Ethos, Journal of Sociolinguistics, Linguistlist, Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Sociolinguistic Studies, Applied Linguistics, Studies in Second Language Acquisition).

2007. Miller, Peggy.; Heidi Fung; Michele Koven. Narrative Reverberations: How Participation in Narrative Practices Co-Creates Persons and Cultures. In Handbook of Cultural Psychology. Shinobu Kitayama, Dov Cohen (eds.) New York: Guilford Press.

2006. Koven, Michele. Feeling in Two Languages: A Comparative Analysis of a Bilingual’s Affective Displays in French and Portuguese. In Bilingualism, Emotions, and Selves. Aneta Pavlenko (ed.) Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

2004. Koven, Michele. Getting “Emotional” in Two Languages: Bilinguals’ Semiotic Resources for the Verbal Performance of Affect. Text 24(4): 471-515.

2004. Koven, Michele. Transnational Perspectives on Sociolinguistic Capital among Luso-descendants in France and Portugal. American Ethnologist 31(2): 270-290.

2002. Koven, Michele. An Analysis of Speaker Role Inhabitance in Narratives of Personal Experience. The Journal of Pragmatics 34(2): 167-217.

2001. Koven, Michele. Comparing Bilinguals’ Quoted Performances of Self and Others in Tellings of the Same Experience in Two Languages. Language in Society 30: 513-558.

1998. Koven, Michele. Two Languages in the Self /The Self in Two Languages: French and Portuguese Bilinguals’ Verbal Enactments and Experiences of Self in Narrative Discourse. Ethos 26(4): 410-455.

Key Concept #22: Cultural Identity by Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc22-sm

Chen, V. H.-H. (2014). Cultural identity. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 22. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/key-concept-cultural-identity.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Italian American identity

Identity, Culture, and Communication among Italian Americans

Call for book chapter proposals on Italian American identity, for edited book.

This book aims to explore how Italian Americans communicate their identities in specific locations around the United States. While there has been some research conducted on migration patterns, sociology, and folklore of Italian Americans, there is very little documentation of their communication experience and of regional differences in those experiences. This is a unique opportunity for communication scholars to contribute to the area of intercultural communication, and to begin an interdisciplinary conversation between the two fields. We invite proposals that reveal the multiple and complex cultural constructions of Italian American identity represented in local communities. This volume will approach topics from a number of critical and theoretical perspectives.

Essays may explore, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • How Italian Americans form and sustain identities through language, speech acts, rituals, cultural artifacts, media, or networks.
  • What Italian Americans make of their own communication practices.
  • The cultural contexts of Italian American communication.
  • Italian American interpersonal communication.
  • Local forms of communication in Italian American communities.
  • How Italian Americans construct or share cultural spaces in their communities.
  • Symbolic meanings in Italian American communication practices.
  • Italian American self-representation versus media representation.
  • Italian Americans communication with other ethnic groups.

Please submit proposals of 300-500 words (as word file) or inquiries to Denise Scannell, Assistant Professor, New York City College of Technology, no later than October 15, 2013.