New UN University

“A new United Nations University to be opened in Barcelona in 2012 will strive to bridge the knowledge gap between different civilizations and develop postgraduate courses focused on cross-cultural dialogue in areas such as education, youth, media and migration. A select group of experts in cross-cultural communication from Europe, North America, North Africa, the Arab world and Asia, along with the United Nations University (UNU) staff gathered in the Spanish city June 1-3, 2011 to identify areas of research, postgraduate teaching and knowledge transfer to be undertaken by the new institution.

To be known as the International Institute on the Alliance of Civilizations (IIAOC) the new institution will be located at the Sant Pau historic site in Barcelona. It will be funded by the Spanish Government and the state government of Catalonia with the Ministry of Education guaranteeing funding of 2 million Euros a year from 2013 onwards for an initial period of four years. An international search for its first director is underway, who is expected to be appointed by the end of 2011. IIAOC will contribute to reinforcement of peace by reflecting upon a future of tolerance, dialogue and cooperation among different cultures…

“Intercultural dialogue is not easily achieved and it involves cultivating our human and ethical potential,” noted Fred Dallmayr from the University of Notre Dame in the USA. He said the ancients called it a culture of virtues which includes temperance, wisdom and justice. “In today’s culture we need to have another virtue, the openness to different ideas, different voices, different languages and the virtues of what Indians call — karuna — compassion. These are virtues we have to study, cultivate and train ourselves to practice,” he said.

Prof Ramin Jahanbegloo, political scientist from the University of Toronto, argued that what is being built is an institution which is not clash oriented but dialogue oriented. “The question is not about who are the dialogue partners, but at what point the dialogue partners start to talk and work together on issues that often cause debate,” he argued.”

For further information, see the original posting in IDN-InDepthNews/06.06.2011

job ad – U Montreal

Assistant professor in political communication at Université de Montréal

Department of Communication
Faculty of Arts and Science
Assistant Professor in Political Communication

The Department of Communication invites applications for a full-time tenure-track position as Assistant Professor in Political Communication.
Responsibilities:
Successful candidates will be expected to teach at all three levels of the curriculum, supervise graduate students, engage in ongoing research and publication, and contribute to the academic life and reputation of the institution.

Requirements
* PhD (or near completion) in Communication or in a related field.
* Evidence of dynamism and creativity in teaching and pedagogy.
* Research interests and relevant research experience in issues related to contemporary Political Communication, such as analysis of new communication practices and strategies of political actors including citizens, parties, elected officials, journalists, government bodies, para-governmental agencies and pressure groups; Web-based political activities and new types of activism and militancy; studies of new media practices and media roles in political processes; analysis of speeches, interaction or elements that contribute to the definition of the field, its participants and contemporary power formations.
* Proficiency in the French language.  The Université de Montréal is a Québec university with an international reputation.  French is the language of instruction.  To renew its teaching faculty, the University is intensively recruiting the world’s best specialists.  In accordance with the institution’s language policy, the Université de Montréal provides support for newly-recruited faculty to attain proficiency in French.

Salary
The Université de Montréal offers a competitive salary and a complete range of employee benefits.

Starting Date
From January 1 or June 1, 2012.

Deadline
The complete application, including a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copies of recent publications and research, evidence of teaching effectiveness and a statement of research and teaching interests, must be received at the address below by September 15, 2011.

Three letters of recommendation are to be sent to the department director at the following address:
François Cooren, Director
Department of Communications
Université de Montréal
P. O. Box 6128, Station Centre-Ville
Montreal, Quebec,  H3C 3J7
CANADA
Phone: 514 343-7819
Email: f.cooren@umontreal.ca

For more information about the Department of Communication, please consult the Web site.

Confidentiality
The Université de Montréal application process allows all regular professors in the Department to have access to all documents unless the applicant explicitly states in her or his cover letter that access to the application should be limited to the selection committee.  This restriction on accessibility will be lifted if the applicant is invited for an interview.

Employment Equity Program
The Université de Montréal upholds the principles of employment equity and invites applicants to complete the employment equity identification questionnaire posted www.fas.umontreal.ca/affaires-professorales/documents/quest-acces-emploi-EN.pdf and attach it to their application.

Immigration Requirements
In compliance with Canadian immigration requirements, priority shall be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents.

Transnational media CFP

CALL FOR PAPERS

Book Project Title: Community and Transnational Media Trajectories

Community radio in South Asia can be described as a social movement sparked by the proliferation of information technologies, the debates on the digital divide, and lobbying by civil society sectors, calling on nations for not having policies on community media.  The confluence of not-for-profit stakeholdership, the availability of technologies, local youth ingenuity, cautious political will, has spurred the emergence of community radio in several parts of the world especially South Asia. The question pertinent here is why now and why radio? The phenomena of community radio in the South Asian region requires that there be a greater reflection on movements (political, social, cultural) across the world  and not just within S. Asia, where there is a similar coming together of new media technology, local and national political ferment, youth mobilization and resultant efforts at institution building.

This is a request for abstracts of papers from those who are studying emerging socio-cultural-political movements that have resulted in building media systems locally, in opposition to existing hegemonic conglomerate media, thereby creating a cultural shift in how a particular local or global issue is understood.  The submitted papers need to be studies conducted in local contexts and communities using critical and qualitative methodologies and theory, not simply reflective writing. The edited volume for which there is an interested publisher, purports to be a collection of essays that shows communication scholars how to enquire about and understand contemporary situated social movement and media using critical perspectives and theories, especially transnational, post-colonial, feminist studies. Please send an abstract of 500 words, of the desired contribution by August 1 and send the completed paper, pending approval, by October 15. Contact Priya Kapoor, Associate Professor, Portland State University at kapoorp@pdx.edu

Fulbright deadline

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The application deadline to the Fulbright Scholar Program for US Faculty and Professionals for 2012-2013 is August 1, 2011.

The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program offers 225 teaching, research or combined teaching/research awards in Communications. Faculty and professionals in communications also can apply for one of our 186 All Discipline awards open to all fields.

U.S. citizenship is required.  For more information, visit our website at www.iie.org/cies or contact us at scholars@iie.org.

Faculty and professionals are also encouraged to participate in one of our weekly webinars.  For more information, visit our website at www.iie.org/cies/webinar.

Amy Frake
Outreach and Public Affairs
Institute of International Education
Council for International Exchange of Scholars
3007 Tilden St. NW, Suite #5L
Washington, DC 20008
(202) 686-6250 | (202) 362-3442
afrake@iie.org | www.iie.org/cies

The Fulbright Scholar Program and Humphrey Fellowship Program are administered by the Institute of International Education’s Department of Scholar and Professional Programs, which includes the Council for International Exchange of Scholars and Humphrey divisions.

The competition for 2012-13 Fulbright Scholar grants is now open. The application deadline for most programs is August 1, 2011. U.S. scholars and professionals can learn how to present their credentials at www.iie.org/cies.

Crossing boundaries Asia/Pacific CFP

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

Working Title: Crossing Boundaries: Working and Communicating in the Asia Pacific Region
Proposal Submission Deadline: July 15, 2011

A book edited by
Jolanta Aritz, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Francesca Bargiela-Chiappini, Ph.D.
Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, UK

Robyn C. Walker, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

We invite you to submit a chapter for an edited volume of research on Asian Business Discourse(s) (ABD). Routledge Publishing has expressed an interest in the topic of Asian discourse(s) and is interested in publishing the volume.

We are looking for manuscripts that provide:
*       Illumination of the field: Past, current, and future
*       Theoretical developments in the field
*       Empirical research studies.
The contributions should be focused on the use of business or organizational discourse methods and their application in the area of Asian Business Discourse(s).

We use the term “business discourse” to refer to authentic language interaction, talk, and writing in a corporate setting that is “founded on the twin notions of discourse as situated action and of language as work” (Nickerson & Chiappini, 2002, p. 277, emphasis original). It is a language-based approach of looking at individuals who engage in interaction in a corporate setting that is motivated by a concern to understand how they communicate strategically in an organizational context (Bargiela-Chiappini, Nickerson, & Planken, 2007). The variety of methodologies employed to conduct such analysis include conversation analysis, pragmatics, corpus linguistics, genre analysis, ethnography, and rhetorical analysis.

The term “organizational discourse” is used by scholars in the fields of management and communication working in the tradition of North American organizational communication; although, one can also come across the term “organizational rhetoric” used in more management-oriented scholarship. Based on the way the two terms are used, we conclude that the rhetorical emphasis, heightened by the use of the term “organizational rhetoric,” is  subsumed under “organizational discourse” as one of four domains of discourse that constitute texts for analysis. The other three domains include conversation and dialogue; narratives and stories; and tropes or metaphors (Grant et al. 2004).

The field of business and organizational discourse has traditionally relied on a Western paradigm/ perspective. Asian Business Discourse(s) is an enterprise with Western antecedents but with increasingly localized expressions, which reflect the concerns and expectations of specific geo-political and socio-economic locales (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press, emphasis in original). Some East and South East Asian scholarship is still emerging (see: Jung 2009; Chew 2009) while other has reached a more advanced stage of development (e.g. Nair-Venugopal, 2009; Cheng 2009; Zhu and Li 2009; Tanaka 2009) (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press).

The proposed volume intends to give a stronger voice to research on business communication practices in Asian countries and build an intersection between scholarship coming out of that region and business practices that would benefit from integrating the findings into their training programs and operational practices. The global economy has created new realities for businesses, and the need for understanding differing communication practices and cultural values is greater than ever, particularly in regard to the surging economies in the East.

Abstract Submission Guidelines
Researchers are invited to submit a one-page proposal clearly explaining the objective of their proposed chapter, including an explanation of the research methodology used, the research questions and the key findings of their study. Please send abstracts as e-mail attachments to
rcwalker@marshall.usc.edu or aritz@marshall.usc.edu by July 15, 2011.

Abstracts should include:
1. The title of the paper
2. A list of 3-5 key words describing the area and focus
3. The name(s) of the author(s) and their affiliation(s)
4. The corresponding author’s e-mail address and contact details
5. A short biographical statement for each author.

References
Bargiella-Chiappini, F. (in press). Asian Business Discourse(s). In J. Aritz & R. Walker (Eds.) Discourse Perspectives on Organizational Communication. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F., Nickerson, C. & Planken, B. (2007). Business Discourse. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F. &  Nickerson, C. (2002). Business Discourse: Old Debates, New Horizons. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, (IRAL), 40 (4): 273-381.

Grant, Hardy, C., Oswick, C. & Putnam, L. (2004). The Sage Handbook of Organizational Discourse. London: Sage.

Thank you,
Robyn Walker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Clinical Management Communication
USC Marshall School of Business

University of the Ryukyus

On June 1, 2011 I presented a talk to a large group of mostly students, entitled “From Generation to Generation: Maintaining Cultural Identity over Time” at the University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan.

Jue 1 Ryukyus

On June 2, 2011 I presented a faculty workshop entitled “Writing the Social History of Language and Social Interaction Research.” Before this event we had a faculty lunch at a local restaurant, where my husband and I were introduced to traditional Okinawan delicacies. Pictured below are (back row): Professors Madoka Kanemoto, Katsuyuki Miyahira, Kenji Yoshida and (front row): Professor Hiroko Onaha, me and Professor Yasusada Uechi , all of the Department of Languages and Cultures at the University of the Ryukyus.

Faculty lunch at University of the Ryukyus

Then, on June 3, 2011 I presented a talk to faculty (although many students also attended), co-sponsored by the Okinawa Society for Foreign Language and Literature, entitled “Socially Constructing Communication.” My thanks to Prof. Yasusada Uechi , President of the Society, for serving as the connection to the group, and to Prof. Masuo Kataoka, Vice President, for making the introduction on behalf of the Society.

University of Ryukyus

After the talk we had a faculty dinner, including Professors Madoka Kanemoto, Miki Shibata, and Katsuyuki Miyahira, as well as one student representative, Nina Arakaki.

Faculty dinner at U Ryukyus

My thanks to Prof. Katsuyuki Miyahira for organizing all of these events, for inviting my husband and me to his home for dinner with his wife, Yaeko, and son, Yuta, and for the extended day exploring Okinawa, including Ryukyu-mura and the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium.

Prof Miyahira, Prof Leeds-Hurwitz
Prof Miyahira, Prof Leeds-Hurwitz

Thanks are also due to Prof. Madoka Kanemoto for a tour on a different day to Shikinaen Royal Garden and Shurijo Castle, both of which are UNESCO World Heritage sites. And to multiple graduate students: Samantha May and Yuko Naka for their guidance to local fabrics and shopping opportunities, and Yuta and Charlie for the airport runs.

Okinawa was the last stop in Asia, and it was a delightful ending. I look forward to continued conversations with many of the faculty and students I met there.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS
7th Annual Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference
THE POLITICS, PRACTICES, AND POETICS OF THE ARCHIVE
SINGAPORE
19 – 22 JUNE, 2012

Eight years since the first Annual Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference which heralded the resurgence of cinematic new waves in the region, we turn our eyes to the state of film archiving and the relationship between cinema and the archives. Filipino film critic Alexis Tioseco’s 2009 open letter to the Film Development Council of the Philippines mentions current holdings stored in ‘deplorable conditions’. In his letter, Tioseco praises the National Film Archive of Thailand for its work in doing so much with so little. In Indonesia, the Sinematek Indonesia which was established in the early 1970s has also seen cuts that make the archive a shadow of its former glory. It is only in Singapore that a young Asian Film Archive (est. 2005) has taken root.

The 7th Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference (2012) emphasizes the politics, practices, and poetics of the archive. How does one define an archive? And who can be said to do archival work? Might DVD pirates, private collectors, cinephiles, film bloggers and film societies be considered film archivists of a sort when governments do not or no longer perceive the need to fund national film archives? If so, how does this change the public nature of an archive, and what implications does it have on the production of knowledge? What might film curators take into consideration when they select and preserve films for the archive? What are the social, political, aesthetic, and scholarly roles of the archive? How does the archive negotiate issues of power and accessibility?  What is the role of the archive in the digital age of new media?

At the same time, in interrogating the relationship between film and the archive, might film itself as a socio-cultural text not be regarded as an archive and as a necessary site to re-think temporalities and the reasons for nostalgia? As Derrida reminds us, “The question of the archive is not a question of the past” but rather “a question of the future itself.” Where does the archive lie in creating, defining, and constructing cultural memory or cultural heritage? This conference then invites papers that comment not only on the nature of what an archive is and the role it plays in South East Asia, but also how films and film archives ask us to think about the timeliness of cultural work.

Each year, the conference has included film practitioners in recognition of the crucial role they have played in increasing film education and discourse in the region. We have previously provided space for independent filmmakers and screenings of their works, focused on curriculum development, and highlighting alternative cultures of cinema. This year, the conference seeks to include workshops that bring together film archivists from within the region.

We invite panels that address this theme, particularly questions concerning:
*       Film Archival Materials as Intertexts
*       Comparative Studies of Archives or Case Studies of Specific Archives
*       Role of the Academic / Film Critic / Filmmaker in Relation to the Archive
*       Technology / New Media
*       Production of Temporalities and Spatialities
*       Politics of Taste
*       Preservation and Dissemination
*       Archival Research Methods
*       Intellectual Property
*       The Relationship between Southeast Asian Archives and the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF)
*       Historiography
*       Scholarly Accessibility
*       Subtitling and the Archive
*       Film Policy and the Archive
*       The State and the Archive
*       Short Films and the Archive

We also welcome submissions for the open call. Please check our website archives and conference programs for past paper topics as we are less likely to accept topics that have been covered before:
http://seaconference.wordpress.com/conference-program/

Abstract Submission Deadline: Nov 30, 2011 Please send an abstract (max. 500 words) and short bio (max. 100
words) to: Sophia Siddique Harvey (soharvey@vassar.edu), Khoo Gaik Cheng (gaik.khoo@gmail.com) and Jasmine Nadua Trice (jntrice@gmail.com). We are currently attempting to get funding for travel subsidies and accommodations but cannot offer any as of yet.

Prize in Strategic Comm for Public Good

John F. Murray Prize in Strategic Communication for the Public Good
Deadline for nominations extended: August 1, 2011

The 2011 John F. Murray Prize in Strategic Communication for the Public Good will be awarded by the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at The University of Iowa to a pioneering innovator who uses communications to ennoble the human spirit. The Selection Committee seeks an individual whose work through persuasive communication has elevated the well-being of our shared human existence. Such a person will have conceived of, played a key role in, or carried out a vital public campaign aimed at increasing awareness – or spurring a behavioral change – of a fundamental issue that improves the world in which we live. Innovators may have spearheaded public causes, such as advancing health care, education, environment/sustainability, quality of life, or democratic values and governance. They may have created a successful civic project that caused dramatic, quantifiable, and necessary reforms. The results should have a clear and demonstrable impact in either the public or private sectors. To be considered for the award, the impact of the nominee’s action must be publicly documented. Candidates may have devoted substantial parts of their careers to promoting the causes and efforts advanced by the Murray Prize. Candidates may reside in the United States or elsewhere. The winner of the John F. Murray Prize in Strategic Communication for the Public Good may serve in any strategic communication profession. The Murray Prize is not necessarily given every year. In rare circumstances, the Prize may be given to a group or institution. The John F. Murray Prize will consist of an engraved crystal bowl and an honorarium of $2,500. The selection of the winner of the John F. Murray Prize in Strategic Communication for the Public Good will be made by the faculty of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at The University of Iowa. The winner will deliver a public address at an event held in his/her honor in July 2011. The Prize is named after the late John F. Murray, an internationally known benefactor and philanthropist and strategic communication pioneer. To nominate a candidate for the Murray Prize, please send a letter, outlining in detail the nominee’s qualifications and any supporting material to sjmc-murrayprize@uiowa.edu. Only electronic nominations and materials will be accepted.

Organizing special issue

CALL FOR PAPERS

Organizing : a Matter of Language, Discourse, or Communication ?
A special issue of the French journal Sciences de la Société
Guest editors :
Bertrand Fauré, LERASS, Université Toulouse 3.
Daniel Robichaud, Department of communication, Université de Montréal

The French interdisciplinary journal Sciences de la Société (SdS) will publish, for its 80th edition, a special issue aimed at fostering dialogue between disciplinary and linguistic research communities that study organizations and processes of organizing. Organizations and organizing processes are at the forefront of contemporary global transformations and change the lives of individuals across the world. Organization studies have also been a growing interest for SdS readers and editors (see issues 74, 63, 61, 59, 50 and 51 in the past 10 years only). More importantly, a common concern in contemporary anglophone and francophone research communities on organizations is the role of language/discourse/communication in the constitution and formation of organizational realities.

In the anglophone world, the “interpretive turn” (Putman & Pacanowski, 1983), among other influences, shaped the emergence of a young field – called Organization communication – that developed progressively into an autonomous and “discipline” (Mumby, 2007; Mumby & Stohl, 2007). With its professional networks, journals, and academic programs, the field has become increasingly institutionalized, especially in the United States and Canada. In parallel with the latter, another field, emerged in the early 1990s in Europe and elsewhere around the notion of organizational discourse and discursive approaches to organizations (Grant, Hardy & Oswick, 2004). Whereas both fields developed rather independently form each other until the 2000s (Jian et al., 2008 ; Taylor, 2008), many bridges have been built since through conferences and journals (e.g., see Teun van Dijk’s Discourse  & Communication).

In the francophone world, scholarly efforts to look at the constitutive role of discourse and communication are still scattered. At least three relatively distinct and rapidly evolving traditions can be identified: (1) the sociology of work and its growing focus on talk-at-work (langage au travail) (Borzeix & Fraenkel, 2005); (2) management sciences and the emergent discursive analysis of organizations (Girin, 1990; Lorino, 2005); and (3) communication studies of organizations (Bernard, 2002; Delcambre, 2000). Despite the diversity of their disciplinary origins, all seem to acknowledge the basic role of language use, discourse, and communication in organizing. But beyond isolated collaborations, an interdisciplinary dialogue is still lacking.

In both linguistic communities, many conceptual issues are in need of being further developed and clarified. As numerous authors have noted in both communities, notions such as discourse, communication, interaction, conversation, texts, and others, are still used in ambiguous and equivocal ways. What do expressions such as “organizations are constituted in, by, or through language/discourse/communication” mean? What do we mean by “constitute” or “constitution”? Do we mean that they are instituted, created, produced, shaped, or enacted? Or do we mean that organizational emergence, perpetuation, and change processes are anchored, embedded or embodied in language/discourse/communication?

SdS calls for manuscripts that address fundamental questions like these through theoretical/conceptual essays and/or empirical studies. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
1. Epistemological and ontological foundations of so-called “constitutive” approaches to communication, discourse, and organization;
2. Theoretical approaches and propositions dealing with the constitutive role of discourse and communication (through performativity, narrative construction, transformative texts, etc.);
3. Methodological approaches for the empirical analysis of discursive materials and interactions that allow us to investigate their organizing properties;
4. The contribution of such approaches to our understanding of organizational processes, such as organizational learning, knowledge management, change, leadership, globalization, strategy, or inter-organizational collaboration, among others.

Submissions will be reviewed in their original language (French or English). If accepted, the final version of each English manuscript will be translated to French by the journal. Papers should not exceed 8,000 words in length, including notes, references and a 150-word abstract. The manuscript should be formatted according to the guidelines provided by the American Psychological Association (APA) format (5th ed.), and submitted as an MS Word document (.doc, .docx) or Rich Text (.rtf) format. Names, emails, addresses and affiliations of authors should be included on a separate page. Papers should be sent as an attachment to the following addresses by December 1st, 2011:
Bertrand.faure@iut-tarbes.fr
daniel.robichaud@umontreal.ca
Jean-louis.darreon@univ-jfc.fr

The guest editors also plan to organize a special workshop in Toulouse, France, in June 2012 to bring together all contributors whose papers will have been selected.

(Originally posted to CRTNET)

G-STEM Program Manager

G-STEM Program Manager
Spelman College

“The G-STEM PROGRAM MANAGER, Enhancing Global Research and Education in STEM at Spelman College, is a multi-year, grant-funded position. This position is designed to ensure that the G-STEM office provides an innovative and integrated approach to student learning that works collaboratively with academic units and international partners…

Description:
The G-STEM PROGRAM MANAGER, Enhancing Global Research and Education in STEM at Spelman College, is a mult-year, grant-funded position. This position is designed to ensure that the G-STEM office provides an innovative and integrated approach to student learning that works collaboratively with academic units and international partners, preparing Spelman students to participate in mentored learning/research experiences in an ever-changing global environment.The position will also oversee the daily office operations on matters including study-abroad STEM research programs, student mentoring and curriculum selection, budget, policies and procedures.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to the following:
*Advise students seeking information, admission, and registration into approved research/education study abroad programs.
*Develop and implement new research/learning collaborations between Spelman College and other international institutions.
*Establish and implement communication strategies between G-STEM and international institutions with the goal of increasing the number of new partnerships.
*Review and coordinate all activities with the Gordon-Zeto Dean for Global Education.
*Collaborate with Spelman Curriculum Committee and Department Chairs to achieve curricular integration of international opportunities.
*Collaborate with Spelman Study Abroad Office for smooth functioning of Study Abroad Approvals.
*Generate reports to the Provost Office and NSF regarding G-STEM activities, outcomes and implementation plans.
*Develop and deliver faculty and student pre-departure orientations. Collaborate with program evaluator to maintain appropriate systems for measuring student outcomes as related to G-STEM and QEP. Supervise billing, bill payment, and financial processes.
*Execute the responsibilities of a manager according to lawful and ethical standards.
*Recruit, select and develop strategies for the research/teaching mentoring team members at Spelman College.
*Oversee the arrival experience of G-STEM students, coordinate communication and delivery of services to students while abroad, and plan and coordinate reentry to campus.
*Coordinate with Study Abroad Office the health, safety, and risk management plans and act as primary emergency response point person for students abroad. Oversee immigration compliance and file management of students.
*Stay current regarding international laws and issues related to student exchange.
*Keep pace with an ever-changing global environment, and be willing to travel internationally.
*Participate in activities that connect G-STEM to the Quality Enhancement Plan, Spelman Going Global!
*Supervise administrative assistant activities.

Requirements:
Our ideal candidate profile will include:
*Master’s degree required in a STEM field; Ph.D. in a STEM field preferred. One to three (1-3) years of experience working with student travel abroad programs desired. Must have a strong interest in undergraduate education.
*Candidates with international experiences through study and/or work abroad, and a second language preferred. Working knowledge of the STEM disciplines at the undergraduate level is highly desired.
*Must be familiar with higher education in a global environment; knowledgeable of international travel; and demonstrate cultural sensitivity. Strong interpersonal skills are required with faculty, staff, students, and other constituents of the College both domestically and globally. Must possess superior organizational, problem resolution, and effective supervisory skills.
*Must possess the ability to interact effectively as either a leader or as a member of a team and work collaboratively with other departments. Must be able to listen to student and faculty (international and at Spelman) and to understand and respond productively to their requests. This position also requires one to communicate (verbal and written) effectively and professionally to facilitate the development of new international partnerships and sustainable relationships between Spelman and foreign educational institutions. *Must be able to adapt to changing assignments; multiple priorities; and to meet deadlines successfully.
*Must be able to work independently, be detail oriented, and show initiative; must possess extraordinary organizational and interpersonal skills; must have the ability to work under pressure within established deadlines and effectively handle multiple tasks.
*The ability to utilize technology to support advising and program management. Must have advanced computer software skills using the Microsoft Office Suite (Office 2007) including (Word, Excel, Power Point). Must be able to create such products as general correspondence, flyers, reports, spreadsheets, presentation, etc. Must be able to utilize email systems such as Lotus Notes/Outlook. The individual must have advanced knowledge of internet software.

Please include a cover letter with your submission.”

(Original post made to Inside Higher Education)