Translation & Translanguaging Films

Resources in ICD“ width=The 11 short films produced by the Translation and Translanguaging TLANG team provide a teaching and research resource in the areas of multilingualism, superdiversity, and sociolinguistics. They also document engagement approaches with different stakeholders. Those investigating linguistic and social diversity, migration, translation and translanguaging, may find them particularly useful. TLANG was a major research project active 2014-18; its aim was to understand how people communicate across diverse languages and cultures.

  1. Voices of the Bullring Markets : This video provides an introduction to the superdiverse nature of the Bullring meat and fish markets in Birmingham.

  2. The Library of Birmingham : This video provides an account of language and interaction at the Library of Birmingham.

  3. Communication in the Multilingual City: This film of the final TLANG conference contains discussions about translanguaging and offers a range of interpretations.

  4. Translanguaging and the Arts: A Creative Conversation:  This film explores researchers, artist and creative practitioners working together to represent multilingualism and superdiversity in new and engaging ways.

  5. Overcoming Barriers to University Education in South Africa: Highlights from workshops held in South Africa to engage university lecturers and managers in discussions about translanguaging as pedagogy in higher education in South Africa, and the role of South Africa’s official languages in university classrooms.

  6. Researching Translanguaging Summer School: Scholars from all over the world attended this summer school which explored different conceptualisations of translanguaging and methodological approaches for researching linguistic diversity.

  7. Women & Theatre: The TLANG team collaborated with a creative company, ‘Women and Theatre’, who produced an original piece of theatre in response to their engagement with the research project. The show was performed 22 times in four cities, to enthusiastic and appreciative audiences.

  8. A Network Assembly I:  This captures how a range of different stakeholders including policy makers, councillors, museum curators, local business people, artists, academics and students engage with concepts such as superdiversity, translanguaging and multilingualism.

  9. Changing Lives: This film shows the work of a Chinese community Centre and provides an account of how the lives of people visiting the centre are changing.

  10. Team Work in the City:  This film shows the coaching practices of a volleyball coach communicating with volleyball players from different countries around the world.

  11. Crossing Borders: Translanguaging as Social Practice.This short film captures our partnership with a range of stakeholders including artists, policy makers, academics and community activists around the themes of language, superdiversity, sport and law.

Free E-Seminar: Translanguaging, Superdiversity & ESOL

2017 e-seminar: ‘Translanguaging, superdiversity and ESOL’
ESOL-Research email forum
in collaboration with The AHRC-funded ‘Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural and Transformation in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities’

Monday 23 January 2017 – Friday 10 February 2017

The e-seminar will take as a point of departure materials that will be circulated on the ESOL-Research email forum on Monday 23 January.

Discussants:
Dermot Bryers, English for Action, London
Melanie Cooke, King’s College London
Becky Winstanley, Tower Hamlets College, London

ESOL-Research members are invited to join the seminar discussion on the ESOL-Research forum.

The ESOL-Research email forum is an online site for discussion of matters relating to the teaching and learning of English for Speakers of Other Languages who are migrants to the UK. Membership stands at 950, and comprises ESOL professionals, academics and others interested in language learning in migration contexts. It is easy to subscribe, and also to unsubscribe, to the ESOL-Research email forum. Please visit www.jiscmail.ac.uk/ESOL-Research and follow the instructions at ‘subscribe/unsubscribe’. If you have any difficulty, please contact the list manager, James Simpson, j.e.b.simpson AT education.leeds.ac.uk

The timetable for the seminar is as follows:
23 January: materials for seminar distributed to ESOL-Research members
30 January: Discussant response distributed to ESOL-Research members
31 January: seminar opens to ESOL-Research members for contributions to discussion by email
10 February: seminar closes

Any queries please contact James Simpson, TLang co-investigator, University of Leeds  j.e.b.simpson AT education.leeds.ac.uk or Sarah Martin, TLang project administrator, University of Birmingham s.l.martin AT bham.ac.uk

CFP Translanguaging: Researchers & Practitioners in Dialogue (Sweden)

Translanguaging – researchers and practitioners in dialogue is a two-day international conference on translanguaging to be hosted by The School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences (HumUS) at Örebro University, Sweden, on 28 and 29 March, 2017.

Planning information
Abstract submission deadline: 30 November, 2016
Conference registration for all participants: 1 December, 2016
Conference registration deadline: 31 January, 2017

Translanguaging describes both multilingual communication competence and pedagogical practice. The concept highlights the capacity of bi- and multilinguals to make themselves understood and produce nuanced meanings by gliding between languages on the basis of their whole linguistic repertoires. In bilingual education, translanguaging foregrounds a flexible juxtaposition of different ‘languages’ for meaningful learning with others in instructional processes.

Translanguaging has introduced progressive perspectives and theoretical claims which have given distinction to the place of the concept within sociolinguistics, multilingualism and visually-oriented research. Translanguaging theory moves beyond the autonomous linguistic systems of traditional bilingualism and even the view that bilingual performance is supported by the interdependence of two (or more) linguistic systems. It proposes a view of bilingualism as resourced by a single repertoire of language features from which translinguals draw strategically to meet multilingual demands and goals. Bilingual as dual competence is reconceptualized as the capacity to communicate with a single, integrated, set of both signed and spoken language assets. Consonant with this claim, is the notion that multilinguals operate communicatively on the basis of their own idiolects rather than with primary orientation to the structures of named languages which are viewed not as linguistic entities, but as socially and politically defined. Thus translanguaging challenges traditional school practices of assessing communicative proficiency and offers new ways of perceiving and promoting the linguistic and intellectual development of bilingual students.

While translanguaging scholarship multiplies, a growing number of educational leaders and teachers express interest in in the potential pedagogical prospects of translanguaging for content and language integrated learning. However, the development of scholarly thinking has not always lent itself to educational application. Canagarajah (2014), for example, mentions a romanticization of translanguaging and a cognitive, individualistic, orientation to translanguaging competence at the expense of social and interactional issues. Theoretical imbalance, in effect, hinders the pedagogical currency of translanguaging. The conference title emphasizes the vision to bring researchers and practitioners from different educational arenas into dialogue around the opportunities and challenges of translanguaging as enabling both communicative and pedagogical participation in classrooms. The aim is also for participants to engage critically and constructively with the theoretical and methodological challenges arising from the use of translanguaging in multilingual analysis and educational approaches.

Keynote speakers confirmed for the conference are:
Deborah Chen-Pichler, Linguistics Gallaudet University, USA.
Maaike Hajer, Dutch language arts and applied linguistics, Nijmegen University, NL.
Holly Link, Educational Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania, USA.

In addition to the perspectives and inspirations from the keynote speakers, the conference platforms 18 presentation and discussion sessions with the purpose of displaying a variety of current research and educational projects which make strategic use of translanguaging (see Preliminary programme). The sessions are planned as arenas for presentation, discussion and interactive engagement with topics which provide focus on the conference theme.

Abstract submission for these sessions is now open. An abstract of maximum 820 words is required which is structured by a form that you can download here. On completion, this form should be sent to Kicki Ekberg, the conference administrator (kicki.ekberg[at]oru.se). The deadline for submitting abstracts is 31 October, 2016. After this a ‘blind’ two-reviewer procedure will ‘select’ the 18 conference presentations and presenters will be informed about the result of their submission at the end of November or beginning of December.

Each present and discuss session will be allocated 25 minutes. We strongly recommend that you plan a 15-minute presentation to allow for 10 minutes of discussion. Since we are requiring a relatively long abstract, we will not be inviting the selected presenters to submit a longer paper. A longer paper version of your presentation for distribution at the session could be a good strategy for homing rapidly in what is central or crucial in your contribution and supplying further information for those who are interested.

CFP Translanguaging and Repertoires across Signed and Spoken Languages (Germany)

“Translanguaging and repertoires across signed and spoken languages: Insights from linguistic ethnographies in (super)diverse contexts”
20-21 June 2016
Göttingen (Germany)
Deadline for abstracts: 31 December 2015

Admission is free but registration is necessary

Confirmed presentations:
Alastair Pennycook, University of Technology Sydney
Adrian Blackledge, University of Birmingham
Angela Creese, University of Birmingham
Ulrike Zeshan, University of Central Lancashire
Annelies Kusters, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Ethnic and Religious Diversity
Massimiliano Spotti, Tilburg University
Ruth Swanwick, University of Leeds

The aim of this symposium is to foreground contributions based on linguistic ethnographies which were undertaken in educational settings and public/private/parochial settings in which people engage in the practice of translanguaging. With translanguaging we mean the linguistic practices in which people with diverse and multilingual backgrounds engage in order to make themselves understood by others. When doing so, they do not make use of separated languages but use elements/lexicon/grammar of (what might be regarded as) two or more different languages, hence the term ‘translanguaging’. In the process of translanguaging, people typically make use of a variety of channels or modalities: they may speak, point, gesture, sign, write, in a variety of combinations – ie multimodality.

When translanguaging, people draw upon linguistic repertoires, a term which denotes that people learn and use to speak, sign, write, read (parts of) different languages throughout their lives. Linguistic repertoires are typically multimodal, for example gestures are inherent part of spoken language production and mouthings are inherent part of many signed languages. In addition to biographic linguistic repertoires, there are spatial repertoires, linked to specific locations such as markets and repertoires linked with a certain culture and/or religion. Importantly, translanguaging not only draws on but also transforms repertoire.

Current works into spoken languages translanguaging include Angela Creese and Adrian Blackledge’s ongoing AHRC project “Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities” (2014-2018). Alastair Pennycook is (with Emi Otsuji) the author of the recently published book “Metrolingualism: Language in the City”, which sheds light on the ordinariness of linguistic diversity as people go about their daily lives in the city and make use of diverse linguistic resources. Massimiliano Spotti’s research focuses on asylum seeking 2.0 where identity negotiation in spoken interaction is supplemented with online evidence that corroborates the discourse of suspicion used as standard by the authorities.

Current works into multilingualism/translanguaging in relation to signed languages and/or gesture include Ulrike Zeshan’s ongoing ERC (2011-2016) project “Multilingual Behaviours in Sign Language Users, focusing on “cross-signing”, “sign-speaking”, and “sign-switching”, breaking new ground with respect to a field of research that can be called “Sign Multilingualism Studies”. Ruth Swanwick’s British Academy project is titled “Deafness and bimodal bilingualism: A plurilingual language framework for education”. Annelies Kusters focuses on gestural interactions and multimodality between fluent deaf signers and hearing non-signers in customer interactions and public transport in Mumbai.

We invite/include contributions that are based on the study of translanguaging in practice: how do people make use of different languages and different modalities (signed/gestured, spoken, written) when drawing on different repertoires in order to make themselves understood? The fact that contributions about the full spectrum of human language use (including signed/gestured/spoken/written) are invited, exploring a common theme, is innovative because the study of signed and spoken languages sociolinguistics have developed rather separately from each other. The focus on language use in practice (in which gesture is an inherent element of spoken languages production and mouthed/spoken/written/fingerspelled language is used by people who use signed languages) will be instrumental in bridging these separate strands, which is a much needed development in order to understand human language production in general. The study of gesture has brought signed and spoken language researchers of theoretical linguistics together, but a parallel bridge has not yet been built in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Thus the symposium and the special issue will be cutting edge and highly competitive, as they extend concepts of translanguaging because of the unique ways in which signed and spoken languages are be used together. In short, the goal of the symposium is to create new knowledge, dialogue or transactions between studies of sign and spoken language diversity and plurality.

The languages of presentation will be International Sign and English, and English-IS interpretation will be organized.