International Symposium on Cultural Diplomacy

“The International Symposium on Cultural Diplomacy in the USA is an international conference held by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in association with high-profile international partners in Washington, D.C., May 18-21, 2011. This year´s event brings together key stakeholders from the US, Europe, and across the world to reflect on the future of US and European foreign policy and related issues. The program will consist of keynote speeches, lectures, panel discussions and social activities that will provide the audience with an opportunity to gain insights, reflect on, discuss and debate the salient issues.

The 2011 conference will focus on the theme “The Roles and Responsibilities of the US and Europe in the New Global Community”. The theme was selected in recognition significant developments in the field of international relations. Firstly: The development of a new global community with new players, both at the sub-state and inter-state level, and new forms of influence and power. Secondly,the emergence of new, global challenges, The developments in the Arab World, disasters, financial instability, terrorism, and the prevention of health pandemics, are all areas of activity that require the community to build sustainable, multilateral approaches.

In recognition of these developments, there is a demonstrable need to analyze and reflect on the activity of the US and Europe within this new context, and in addressing these new challenges. The conference will therefore begin with an assessment of the new global community: How has it been formed, how does it operate, and what changes are we likely see in the future. Following this, the focus will move to a consideration of the key challenges facing the global community today, from climate change and natural disasters to cultural differences. Finally, the program will build on these discussions to reflect on the positions of the US and Europe in this changing international environment and: What do their international partners expect of the US and Europe, and how can they forge stronger relations with countries in all regions to ensure the cooperation necessary to tackle the challenges ahead?

Symposium Speakers »
Speakers during the Symposium will include leading figures and experts from international politics, academia, the diplomatic community, civil society and the private sector, from across the world. These speakers will include a number of individuals from the ICD Advisory Board (for further information about the Advisory Board please click here).

Symposium Participants
The Symposium is open to applications from diplomatic and political representatives, civil society practitioners, private sector figures, journalists, young professionals, students and scholars, and other interested stakeholders in international relations from across the world.”

For further details, see the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy website.

ICA travel funds for international scholars

The Road to Boston

Larry Gross, President-Elect, International Communication Association

Larry Gross“First, a little institutional history.

In the early 1990s I chaired an ICA Task Force on Diversity that was charged, among other things, with recommending ways to increase the attendance at conferences and participation in the organization by members of underrepresented minorities in the United States. The Task Force, whose members included Julie D’Acci, Navita James, Geetu Melwani, Federico Subervi, James Taylor, and Angharad Valdivia, made a recommendation to the Board that a program of travel grants be initiated to support minority students who had papers accepted for the ICA conference.

After several years of discussion – or so it seems in recollection — at the Albuquerque meetings in May 1995 the ICA Board adopted the proposal to add a surcharge of $1USD to each conference registration fee and use the funds so obtained to provide travel scholarships to minority students attending the Chicago meetings (minority being defined here as African-American, Hispanic/Latino/a, Native American, Pacific Islander).

The program began small. In the 1996 Report of the Task Force, I noted:

Four nominations were forwarded from divisions to the ICA Headquarters, and an ad hoc consultative group (Task Force Chair Larry Gross, Conference Program Chair Stan Deetz, and ICA Executive Director Bob Cox) decided to award grants totaling $1300 USD to the four nominees (the figure of $1300 USD was agreed on as a reasonable estimate of the surcharge yield). We agreed to allocate $300 USD to each of three “mainland” student members, and $400 USD to a student member travelling from Hawaii.

That was then.

In the decade and a half since the travel awards were initiated, ICA has undergone a radical shift towards internationalization – a commitment to making the “I” in its name reflect reality as well as aspiration – and the travel grant program has expanded its focus to support the goal of encouraging and enabling participation of students, and faculty, from UN Tier B and C countries. In 2010, in Singapore, the Board voted to increase the conference fee surcharge (actually, this is folded into the conference fee) to $5.00 USD.

In 2003 the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania endowed two funds in support of conference travel grants (one, embarrassingly, named in my honor). The interest from these funds provides additional money to the available pool of travel support. Finally, many divisions devote a large portion of the funds available to them to providing travel grants.

This year a total of over $35,000 USD was awarded to 55 conference participants. We are able to provide travel grants ranging from $500 USD to $900 USD (the amounts vary in relation to the distance and travel costs incurred). Travel fund recipients come from 22 countries, including the United States. Forty-three of the recipients are students; 12 are faculty members. The largest number come from the United States (22), followed by the People’s Republic of China and Korea with five each. Other countries represented include Argentina, Costa Rica, Egypt, India, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines, Romania and Singapore.

The road to this point has been long, but the goal is an important one to ICA’s mission and the progress we’ve made since we started this effort 15 years ago is truly gratifying, even while it is clear that we still have some distance to go. So, please make the journey to Boston and join us as we build the ICA we all want to see flourish.”

from April 2011 ICA newsletter.

Helen Sun Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesHelen Sun, originally from the People’s Republic of China, earned her Ph. D. in Mass Communication from Florida State University in 2003.

An Associate Professor of Communication, Sun is currently teaching in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at the University of Texas – Permian Basin (USA). Sun’s scholarly interests include freedom of expression, digital censorship, communication/ telecommunications policy, and intercultural communication.

Sun’s book Internet Policy in China: A Field Study of Internet Cafes has been published by Lexington Books-A Division of Rowman & Littlefield (July, 2010). It is the very first book, internationally, on Internet cafes, in which Sun has coined the terms “digital dictatorship” and “E-public Sphere,” discussing the important topic of Internet freedom in China (www.sundialogue.com).

In July 2010, Sun was invited by US Department of Commerce-Patent & Trademark Office (PTO) as a key-note speaker to present her book on Chinese Internet cafes at PTO’s Global Intellectual Property Academy. Later, Sun was interviewed by the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Zvi Bekerman Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesZvi Bekerman, Ph.D. teaches anthropology of education at the School of Education and The Melton Center, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is also a Research Fellow at the Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace, Hebrew University and a faculty member of the Mandel Leadership Institute.

His main interests are in the study of cultural, ethnic and national identity, including identity processes and negotiation during intercultural encounters and in formal/informal learning contexts. His recent research has focused on the different ways in which adults/teachers and children manage communication conductive to identity construction and negotiation and the relevance attached to identity construction and negotiation in educational contexts in general and more specifically educational contexts in conflict ridden societies.

Since 1999 he has been conducting a long term ethnographic research project in the integrated/bilingual Palestinian-Jewish schools in Israel. He has also recently become involved in the study of identity construction and development in educational computer-mediated environments. In brief, his interests lie in human learning processes, their development, and practice, both in formal/informal and real/virtual environments. He has published numerous papers in these fields of study and is the Editor (with Seonaigh MacPherson) of the refereed journal Diaspora, Indigenous, ad Minority Education: An International Journal (Routledge, 2007). Among his recently published books: with Michalinos Zembylas, Psychologized language in education: Denaturalizing a regime of truth (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018); The Promise of Integrated, Multicultural, and Bilingual Education: Inclusive Palestinian-Arab and Jewish Schools in Israel (Oxford University Press, 2016); with Diana Silberman-Keller, Henry A. Giroux, and Nicholas Burbules, Mirror Images: Popular Culture and Education (2008); with Nicholas Burbules and Diana Keller Silverman, an edited volume entitled: Learning in Places: The Informal Education Reader (Peter Lang, 2006); with Claire McGlynn a volume entitled Addressing Ethnic Conflict through Peace Education: International Perspectives (Palgrave McMillan, 2007); and with Ezra Kopelowitz Cultural Education-Cultural Sustainability: Minority, Diaspora, Indigenous and Ethno-Religious Groups in Multicultural Societies (Routledge, 2008).

He can be reached via email.

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal (DIME)

Routledge: Taylor & Francis Group
Editors:
Zvi Bekerman
Hebrew University
mszviman@mscc.huji.ac.il

Seonaigh A. MacPherson
University of British Columbia

Aims & Scope:
Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal (DIME) – a quarterly peer-reviewed journal focused on critical discourse and research in diaspora, indigenous, and minority education – is dedicated to researching cultural sustainability in a world increasingly consolidating under national, transnational, and global organizations. It aims to draw attention to, and learn from, the many initiatives being conducted around the globe in support of diaspora, indigenous, and minority education, which might otherwise go unnoticed.

DIME invites research from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives that emphasize the centrality of marginal voices and a peripheral gaze, and which draw attention to the complex interrelations between political, economic, historical, and social contexts, as well as the ways in which these various contexts shape educational policies, practices, curricula, and outcomes. The journal welcomes articles that ground theoretical reflections in specific empirical research and case studies of diverse locations and peoples as yet underrepresented within scholarly research and literature, as well as action or participatory research studies of exemplary or “best” practices.

Intended to bridge arbitrary disciplinary boundaries in which such research and theorizing are currently conducted, DIME encourages cutting-edge work from around the world to enhance understanding of the relationships between home and school cultures; educational development, curriculum, and cultural change; local, regional, national, and/or transnational forces or institutions; culture, ethnicity, and gender in identity construction; migration and educational change; and societal attitudes and cultural variation.

Peer Review Policy:
All research articles in this journal have undergone rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymous refereeing by two anonymous referees.

Publication office:
Taylor & Francis, Inc., 325 Chestnut Street, Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106.

Readership:
International researchers, teaching professionals and educators, students, community activists and advocates, and policy and program specialists involved in multicultural education, bilingual education, global/international education, migration, diaspora and immigration studies, and cross-cultural studies, as well as all others who share an interest in educational issues that impact diaspora, indigenous, and minority populations.

Only original work not previously published and not currently under review will be considered. Contributions should be in English and will be reviewed anonymously. Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education receives all manuscript submissions electronically via their ScholarOne Manuscripts website located at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/HDIM. ScholarOne Manuscripts allows for rapid submission of original and revised manuscripts, as well as facilitating the review process and internal communication between authors, editors and reviewers via a web-based platform. For ScholarOne Manuscripts technical support, you may contact them by e-mail or phone support via http://scholarone.com/services/support/. If you have any other requests please contact the journal at mszviman@mscc.huji.ac.il.

Save

Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence

Institutions are now invited to apply to the Fulbright Scholar-In-Residence Program.  The deadline is October 17, 2011. The S-I-R Program brings scholars from abroad to teach at U.S. colleges and universities, which can help internationalize curricula and campuses.

The Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence (S-I-R) Program assists U.S. higher education institutions in expanding programs of academic exchange. By supporting non-U.S. scholars through grants for teaching at institutions that might not have a strong international component, both the U.S. institution and the scholar grantee benefit. The Fulbright European Union Scholar-in-Residence (EU S-I-R) is a subset of the S-I-R Program that focuses specifically on strengthening expertise in European Union affairs by bringing scholars and professionals from the European Union to U.S. campuses.

One of the few Fulbright programs that serves institutions, S-I-R gives preference to Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Native American tribal colleges, community colleges and small, liberal arts institutions. There are many opportunities for larger institutions to partner with preference organizations. Your institution is invited to learn how S-I-R can help advance its international presence, assist in faculty and curriculum development, and diversify the educational experiences of its students, scholars and surrounding community.

For more information, a schedule of webinars and application details, visit www.iie.org/cies/sir/

Intercultural Dialogue through Community Media

The Near Media Co-op is seeking 8 participants (4 Irish and 4 non-EU nationals) to take part in a new project, “Intercultural Dialogue through Community Media.”

Participants will complete a FETAC Level 4 course in community radio and form a production team to create a series of 13 radio programmes on the theme of intercultural dialogue to be broadcast on Near90fm. The project will run from late April to mid-September 2011 and participants will be required to attend one full day per week for 7 weeks for FETAC training and thereafter 3 hours per week, for planning and producing the radio series. If you are an Irish or non-EU national interested in participating or would like further information, please contact the project coordinator:

grace@near.ie
Or on 01 848 5211

This project is co-financed by the European Commission under the European Integration Fund and is supported by the Office of the Minister for Integration and Pobal.

Study Abroad-China

I will be leading students from the University of Oklahoma on a four-week Study Abroad program in Kunming, China, June 17- July 14. Undergraduate students will take a three hour course that I teach, “Communication in Chinese Cultures” and a three hour course in East-West poetry. Currently this program is open only to students at the University of Oklahoma. However, if you are interested or know of students who might be interested, contact me and we can look into what could possibly be arranged.

We took students to China last summer and had a wonderful time. The city of Kunming is known as the city of “eternal spring” and has great weather, clean air, great food, and fascinating cultures. It is located in Yunnan Province, Southwest China, home to many non-Han ethnic groups. We will take students to Lijiang, home of the Naxi people, and Shangrila, where there are many Tibetans. It’s a great place to spend the summer, learn about China, and broaden your cultural horizons!

Contact me: tlsandel@ou.edu
See also my website: http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/S/Todd.L.Sandel-1/

Post-doc, U New Mexico

The Department of Communication & Journalism at the University of New Mexico invites applications for two post-doctoral fellowship appointments for fall, 2011. We are seeking scholars with substantial background in culture and communication, intercultural communication, and health, culture and communication. The department offers nationally recognized doctoral, masters and undergraduate degrees, and welcomes research that features diverse theoretical and methodological approaches. Our scholarly community features faculty and graduate students who are active in numerous professional associations, and who regularly collaborate with interdisciplinary institutes and programs such as the Latin American & Iberian Institute, Women Studies, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Applicants will be evaluated according to the overall quality of their academic preparation, the relevance of their research to the department’s academic priorities, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and strength of recommendations. Post-doctoral Fellows will have the opportunity to teach graduate and undergraduate courses and work with graduate students, will be invited to become involved in the Institute for Communication, Culture & Change, and will be expected to contribute to the department research colloquium series. Fellows will be expected to carry out research in their area of specialization and teach two courses each semester. Appointments will be for one year, renewable for up to two subsequent years.

Applicants must have an earned Ph.D. in Communication or a related field by the time of appointment.  A complete application consists of: (1) a signed letter of interest identifying areas of expertise and background, research interests, and teaching experience; (2) a curriculum vitae/academic resume including email address; (3) two samples of recent, representative publications or conference papers; (4) evidence of teaching effectiveness in introductory and advanced undergraduate courses, and graduate level courses, if appropriate; and (5) names and contact information for three references.

Send applications to Mary Jane Collier, Professor, Post-Doctoral Search Committee Chair, Department of Communication & Journalism, MSC03 2240, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, FAX (505) 277-2608, or via email to mjc@unm.edu. Review of applications will begin April 15, 2011 and continue until the Fellowship positions are filled. The University of New Mexico is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.