CMM Institute Fellows (USA)

FellowshipsThe CMM Institute for Personal and Social Evolution is advertising several opportunities that may be of interest to followers of CID this year, not just their CMM Fellows Program.

Opportunity #1:
U.S. East Coast CMM Learning Exchange

In collaboration with the MBA program at Assumption College in Worchester, Massachusetts, our first Learning Exchange will occur on Friday and Saturday, April 20-21, 2018.  The theme is CMM in the World:  Cases for Social Change.  The cost is $50 and includes a light dinner and a continental breakfast.   We are soliciting case studies and envision our time together as a collaborative inquiry to strengthen our individual and collective practices around social responsibility.  For more information, contact ra.frkalATassumption.edu

Opportunity #2:
2018 Fellows Program:  Call for Proposals

In partnership with Columbia University, we are seeking innovative proposals that “take a communication perspective” and draw on CMM in ways that address patterns of inequality and that foster inclusion.  Applications are due by March 15 and notification of acceptance will take place in mid-April.  Our 2018 Fellows will present their work at the 2018 Learning Exchange in Oracle, Arizona in late October.  Fellows recipients will also receive a $500 honorarium and money toward their travel expenses to the Learning Exchange in Arizona.  For more information and for the application, contact bartonbuechnerATgmail.com 

Opportunity #3:
U.S. West Coast CMM Learning Exchange

Save the Date:  Saturday and Sunday, October 27 and 28.
The CMM Institute will travel back to the beautiful Sonoran desert where we have had past Learning Exchanges to explore the theme of “Building Community.”   We will provide more information in the weeks and months to come but, for now, save the date.

CFP Communication for Development & Social Change

Special Issue: Communication for Development and Social Change: Experiences & Future Convergences
Journal of Communication

Guest Editors: Thomas Tufte and Rafael Obregon

Communication for development and social change is at the crossroads of multiple approaches in communication scholarship, including visual communication, organizational communication, media and communication technologies, intercultural communication, and other communication practices. It also constitutes an established practice carried out and supported by agencies in international development and cooperation. In recent years, we have seen a proliferation of experiences and approaches, led by global partnerships and alliances as well as civil society organizations which, in many cases, crystallized in social movements across the globe.

In the aftermath of the financial crisis in 2008 and the so-called ‘Arab Spring’, social movements came to represent a rich and heterogeneous amount of bottom-up citizen and community-driven initiatives. They are cause-driven mobilizations pursuing goals across various issues and sectors, including public health, education urban development, sustainable development, and children’s and women’s rights. Recent humanitarian crises, such as the Ebola crisis and the refugee crises, have led to a widespread citizen engagement through a variety of social change communication and community-led initiatives.

In this processes, digital media and digital-centered forms of mobilization have been crucial, but also contested. The debate has moved beyond the initial techno-determinist fascination with so-called “Facebook” and “Twitter” mobilizations to the recognition of complex and dynamic relations between online and offline communication, organizations and social change, movements and media, performance and protest, communication and public deliberation, as well as among a variety of actors including communities, non-governmental and governmental organizations, movements, and companies pursuing similar agendas.

The energy, creativity, discourses, tactics, and strategies through which various political and social actors communicate for social change have come to challenge and inspire both research and practice. Many governmental and non-governmental organizations are seeking ways and means to reach and connect with constituencies, spark new energy, drive stronger public and policy agendas, build social movements, and promote social change.

Against this backdrop, the focus of this special issue of the Journal of Communication is to offer an in-depth understanding of the role of communication in social movements and various forms of collective action that promote equity, social justice, and human rights by tackling a range of global social problems.

We invite authors to send submissions informed by various theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches in communication studies. We are interested in submissions that:
– Revisit communication and social change theories, models, and arguments that inform research about communication in times of digital media and widespread citizen engagement.
– Examine case studies that bring original theoretical, analytical and conceptual insights about new dynamics of citizen engagement, organizational communication, and other communication practices related to multiple dimensions of social change.
– Critically reflect upon opportunities and limitations that social movements, organizations, non-government organizations, community-based organizations, and other civil society actors confront to spark communication, citizen engagement, and promote social change.
– Address communication experiences in a wide range of policy and development sectors and issues, including health, environment, poverty alleviation, energy, labor, culture, religion, diversity, gender equality, social accountability, and social inclusion.

Manuscripts should not exceed 28 pages (6000 words), including references and figures, and must be submitted through the online submission system of the Journal of Communication. Authors should indicate that they wish to have their manuscript considered for the special issue. Information about author guidelines can be found in the Journal of Communication website.

Deadline for submissions: December 1, 2016.

Inquiries should be sent to Dr. Thomas Tufte (ttufte[at]ruc.dk) and Dr. Rafael Obregon (robregon[at]unicef.org).

This theme issue will be published in 2017.

Kansas State University job ad: Social Change

Assistant Professor in Communication Studies at Kansas State University

Continuing our growth, the Department of Communication Studies at Kansas State University invites applicants for a full-time, tenure track, nine-month appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor beginning
August 2016. We seek a researcher with expertise in the communicative processes and practices of social change, advocacy, or community organizing. This scholar’s work can address these processes and practices in a variety of contexts, such as organizational, intercultural, or political. Preference will be given to candidates who
approach their work from multiple methodologies, assume a critical perspective in their research, demonstrate a history or potential of securing external research funding, and/or pursue research that is
international in scope.

The successful candidate will contribute to K-State’s Vision 2025 goal of being a top-50 research university by 2025 (k-state.edu/2025) in a number of ways: by carrying out a vibrant program of engaged research; by contributing to the department’s reputation for teaching excellence in teaching both graduate and undergraduate courses; by advising graduate and undergraduate students; and by providing service to the department, university, and community. Candidates should have the Ph.D. in communication or a related field in hand by August 2016.

The Department of Communication Studies offers masters’ and bachelors’ degrees in communication and rhetorical studies. We offer four specialized tracks at the undergraduate level: Political Communication,
Organizational Communication, Legal Communication, and Relational Communication. The department makes a strong commitment to civic  engagement and public deliberation through the internationally recognized Institute for Civic Discourse and Democracy, as well as our graduate certificate in Dialogue, Deliberation, and Public Engagement. In addition to producing quality research and innovative teaching, we take pride in our students who compete on nationally competitive debate, orensics, and mock trial teams.

The department is located at Kansas State’s Manhattan campus, home to more than 24,000 students. In 2015, Kansas State University achieved record highs in fundraising and external grant awards while also
enhancing the diversity of its student body. Additionally, Kansas State is recognized for its commitment to engaged scholarship and has the Carnegie Foundation’s Elective Classification on Community Engagement.
A part of the scenic Flint Hills region some 100 miles west of Kansas City, Manhattan is the fastest growing city in Kansas, earning livability.com‘s top ranking for best college town in the U.S., Forbes’ ranking in 2011 as the best small city in the U.S. for business and careers, and glassdoor.com‘s ranking second in 2015 among top
universities for which to work.

Please apply by sending (1) a letter of application, (2) curriculum vita, (3) teaching evaluations, (4) evidence of scholarly activity and (5) names and contact information for three professional references to commstudies@k-state.edu or by mail to Cassie Hall, Department of Communication Studies, 129 Nichols Hall, 702 Mid-Camps Drive South, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

For questions about the position, please contact Dr. Greg Paul.

Kansas State University is an AA/EEO employer of individuals with disabilities and protected veterans and actively seeks diversity among its employees. A background check is required. Screening of applications will begin November 13, 2015, and continue until the position is filled.

This institution offers benefits to same-sex partners.

Public Anthropology Competition 2015

International Publishing Competition
California Series In Public Anthropology

The California Series in Public Anthropology encourages scholars in a range of disciplines to discuss major public issues in ways that help the broader public understand and address them. Two presidents (Mikhail Gorbachev and Bill Clinton) as well as three Nobel Laureates (Amartya Sen, Jody Williams, and Mikhail Gorbachev) have contributed to the Series either through books or forwards.  Its list includes such prominent authors as Paul Farmer co-founder of Partners in Health, Kolokotrones University Professor at Harvard and United Nations Deputy Special Envoy to Haiti.

Each year the Series highlights a particular problem in its international call for manuscripts.  The focus this year will be on STORIES OF INEQUALITY.

We are particularly interested in authors who convey both the problems engendered by inequality as well as ways for addressing it.  Prospective authors might ask themselves:  How can they make their study “come alive” for a range of readers through the narration of powerful stories?  They might, for example, focus on the lives of a few, select individuals tracing the problems they face and how they, to the best of their abilities, cope with them.  Prospective authors might examine a specific institution and how, in various ways, it perpetuates inequality.  Or authors might describe a particular group that seeks to address a facet of the problem.  There are no restrictions on how prospective authors address STORIES OF INEQUALITY – only an insistence that the proposed publication draw readers to its themes through the inclusion of powerful stories about real people.  The series is directed at the general public as well as college students.

The University of California Press in association with the Center for a Public Anthropology will review proposals for publication independent of whether the manuscripts themselves have been completed. We are open to working with authors as they wind their way through the writing process.  The proposals can describe work the author wishes to undertake in the near future or work that is currently underway. The proposals submitted to the competition should be 3-4,000 words long and describe both the overall work as well as a general summary of what is (or will be) in each chapter.  We expect the completed, publishable manuscripts to be between 250-300 pages (or 60,000-100,000 words) long excluding footnotes and references.  Examples of the types of analyses we are looking for include:
*Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil by Nancy Scheper-Hughes
*Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherin Boo
*Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya by Caroline Elkins
*American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, and a Nation’s Drive to End Welfare by Jason DeParle
*Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital by Sheri Fink
*There Are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America by Alex Kotlowitz

We are interested in establishing committed, supportive relationships with authors that insures their books are not only published but are well publicized and recognized both within and beyond the academy.  We are committed to insuring the success of winning proposals.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS APRIL 21, 2015
Submissions should be emailed to: bookseries@publicanthropology.org with the relevant material enclosed as attachments. They can also be sent to: Book Series, 707 Kaha Street, Kailua, HI. Questions regarding the competitions should be directed to Dr. Rob Borofsky at: bookseries@publicanthropology.org.

All entries will be judged by the Co-Editors of the California Series in Public Anthropology: Rob Borofsky (Center for a Public Anthropology & Hawaii Pacific University) and Naomi Schneider (University of California Press).

Erasmus Mundus: Intercultural Mediation 2014-15

Call for scholars scholarship open until 7th of July 2014

Master Erasmus Mundus “Intercultural Mediation: Identities, Mobilities, Conflicts” offers interdisciplinary training for excellence in 4 semesters, Federated by joint research programs within a consortium: Université de Lille (France), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgique), University College Cork (Irlande), Université « Babes-Bolyai » (Roumanie), Université de Wroclaw (Pologne), Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (Sénégal), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexique) and Université Fédérale de Rio de Janeiro (Brésil). Des professionnels et des institutions publiques et privées (Professionals and public and private institutions associated with them).

Located in territories shaped by migration, these institutions have been led to question the social changes, cultural and resulting policies and now extend to the global society. It therefore became necessary to train experts of migration, integration, management of cultural and linguistic diversity, with particular expertise in ethics.

Save

CFP JIIC issue Partnering for Social Change

Call for Special Issue: Partnering for Social Change? Rethinking Intercultural Partnerships in Nonprofit Contexts, for Journal of International and Intercultural Communication

Special Issue Guest Editors: Yea-Wen Chen, Ohio University; Brandi Lawless, University of San Francisco; and Alberto González, Bowling Green State University

Communication scholars have recently directed attention to cultural discourses and nonprofit and voluntary organizations. At the same time, much more needs to be understood about how nonprofit and voluntary organizations constitute (inter)cultural sites, how they work with diverse memberships, stakeholders, publics, and partners, and how they organize for social change. We have chosen the broad term nonprofit organization to encompass not only registered tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organizations but also voluntary, community-based, non-governmental, civil society, and people’s organizations.

Nonprofit organizations are rich contexts for examining issues of identity, structure, institution, relationship, discourse, and power, which are of great interest to intercultural communication scholars. However, scholars have just begun to explore the intersection between intercultural communication and nonprofit relationship building (e.g., partnership, alliance, coalition building, etc.). This special issue serves as a critical space to rethink the challenges and limitations and opportunities of intercultural nonprofit partnership and also re-imagine new possibilities of relating across difference to promote social change.

This special issue invites research that is directed by three central questions: a) How are intercultural partnerships constituted, formed, maintained, negotiated, and practiced in the work of nonprofit organizations?; b) How do nonprofits navigate, negotiate, and mediate the competing dynamics of social structures, identity politics, and power relations as sites of intercultural practices?; c) How do nonprofit partners (e.g., practitioners, communities, funders, scholar, policy-makers, etc.) negotiate their intersecting cultural identities in ways that sustain, reproduce, or resist existing power relations?

All research methodologies are welcome. Papers that emphasize applied case studies, relationships between scholars and practitioners, theorization of culture within nonprofit organizations, social justice issues and examinations of power disparities are preferred. Joint submissions co-authored by nonprofit practitioners and scholars are especially welcome.

Submitting your manuscript: Please submit electronically an extended proposal between 500-600 words (excluding references) by March 15, 2014.  Authors should submit proposals using the journal’s website (www.tandf.co.uk/rjii) and follow instructions for online submission. Please select ‘special forum paper’ to describe the type of submission. JIIC now follows APA 6th edition guidelines. Proposals will undergo a blind review process, and a selection will be shortlisted for development into approximately 3000-word essays. Shortlisted authors must commit to a timeline for revision, resubmission and publication, with full manuscripts to be submitted by August 15, 2014. Final acceptance is contingent upon satisfactory revisions. Questions should be directed to Dr. Yea-Wen Chen.

Postdoc Nat U Singapore

Two-year Postdoctoral Research Fellow Positions 15 July 2012 (avail immediately) at National University of Singapore

The Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation is a project-driven center housed in the Department of Communication and New Media at the National University of Singapore that utilizes ethnographic and participatory action research methods in carrying out culturally-centered social change interventions in marginalized populations. The Center is global in scope with initial project emphases in South Asia and Southeast Asia. The goals of the Center are to (a) create a strategic research core for the social scientific study of health communication and social change issues in Asia (e.g. China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka), (b) develop health communication interventions and policies that are culturally-centered and developed through the acknowledgement of the participatory capacity of local communities in creating culturally meaningful and locally responsive health solutions, (c) disseminate core principles and lessons learned from the culture-centered projects within Asia and across other sectors of the globe, and (d) build health communication research capacity in Asia by creating a training hub for the next generation of health communication theorists, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers across Asia.

The candidate is expected to be familiar with the culture-centered approach to research and evaluation, and is expected to have experience conducting field-based participatory research. Training will be provided on the use of the facilities in the university. The candidate should also have some experience working with ethnography, although on-the-job training will also be provided. Other skills include the ability to carrying out social change campaigns in disenfranchised populations. Proficiency in Bangla, Hindi, Urdu, Nepali, Malay, Philippine, or Mandarin will be an added plus point.

Requirements:
– PhD in the area of health communication, public health, medical anthropology, or medical sociology, with coursework in health communication and qualitative research methods.
– Experience in conducting in-depth interviews, focus groups, and/or ethnographies.

Terms and Conditions
The terms and conditions for the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) are as follows:
1.      Contract to be awarded beginning from July 2012 tenable for up to two years.
2.      An Annual Base Salary of $48,000 per year.
3.      An allowance of S$500 a month as contribution towards housing expenses for non-citizens (i.e. non-Singaporeans) and their spouses who do not own any property in Singapore and whose spouses are not in receipt of any form of housing benefits from their Singapore employers.
4.      Singapore citizens and permanent residents are eligible for provident fund benefits.
5.      Travel Assistance, payable once only, as follows.
*       $2,000 for the Postdoctoral Fellow
*       $2,000 for spouse
*       $1,000 for each eligible child, subject to a maximum of 3 children.  Children must be less than 18 years of age and receiving full-time education.
The above travel assistance is a contribution towards expenses incurred by the appointee and his/her dependants in re-locating to Singapore. Such expenses refer to costs for travel, packing, transportation and insurance of personal and professional effects as well as settling-in expenses.
The travel allowance is contingent upon the Postdoctoral Fellow’s completion of his/her initial two-years’ contract. In the event that the appointee does not fulfill the initial two-years’ contract, the appointee shall be liable to refund the University a proportionate amount of the travel assistance granted to him/her and his/her dependants on appointment.
6.      Foreign PDFs who are granted Singapore Permanent Residence will continue to receive an allowance of S$500 a month as contribution towards housing expenses.  The allowance will cease once they acquire Singapore citizenship.
7.      Medical benefits in accordance with the Medical Benefit Plan.
8.      Vacation leave of 28 days per calendar year.

Contact:
Interested candidates are invited to email a detailed resume, and copies of supporting documents and names and contact details of two academic referees to:
Dr Mohan J. Dutta, Director, Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation at culturecenteredapproach@gmail.com.

Res Asst Health Comm – Nat U Singapore

Research Assistants in Health Communication- 2 positions available immediately at National University of Singapore

The Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) is a project-driven center housed in the Department of Communication and New Media at the National University of Singapore that utilizes ethnographic and participatory action research methods in carrying out culturally-centered social change interventions in marginalized populations. The Center is global in scope with initial project emphases in South Asia and Southeast Asia. The goals of the Center are to (a) create a strategic research core for the social scientific study of health communication and social change issues in Asia (e.g. China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka), (b) develop health communication interventions and policies that are culturally-centered and developed through the acknowledgement of the participatory capacity of local communities in creating culturally meaningful and locally responsive health solutions, (c) disseminate core principles and lessons learned from the culture-centered projects within Asia and across other sectors of the globe, and (d) build health communication research capacity in Asia by creating a training hub for the next generation of health communication theorists, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers across Asia.

The candidate is expected to be familiar with the culture-centered approach to research and evaluation, and is expected to have experience conducting field-based participatory research. Training will be provided on the use of the facilities in the university. The candidate will mostly participate in field-based culture-centered projects, running interventions, as well as conducting evaluations through the use of participatory quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Other skills include the ability to carrying out social change campaigns in disenfranchised populations. Proficiency in Bangla, Hindi, Urdu, Nepali, Malay, Philippine, or Mandarin will be an added plus point.

Requirements:
– Bachelors or Masters in the area of health communication, public health, medical anthropology, or medical sociology, with coursework in health communication and qualitative research methods.

Terms and Conditions:
Salary and benefits will be commensurable to qualifications and working experience. Interested individuals can send their applications, academic transcripts, curriculum vitae and two reference letters to the email address below.

Contact:
Interested candidates are invited to email a detailed resume, and copies of supporting documents and names and contact details of two academic referees to:
Dr Mohan J. Dutta, Director, Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation at culturecenteredapproach@gmail.com.

Public Anthropology book competition

The California Series in Public Anthropology is continuing its International Competition in 2012. It seeks proposals for short books oriented toward undergraduates that focus on how social scientists are facilitating social change. We are looking for accessible, grounded accounts that present compelling stories, stories that inspire others.

The proposals should describe a book that will be relatively short – around 100 pages – with a personal touch that captures the lives of people. The core of the book should involve stories of one or more social scientists as change agents, as making a difference in the world.

The University of California Press in association with the Center for a Public Anthropology will award publishing contracts for up to three such book proposals independent of whether the manuscripts themselves have been completed. The proposals can describe work the author wishes to undertake in the near future.

Interested individuals should submit a 3-4,000 word overview of their proposed manuscript detailing (a) the problem addressed as well as (b) a summary of what each chapter covers. The proposal should be written in a manner that non-academic readers find interesting and thought-provoking.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS MARCH 1, 2012

Submissions should be emailed to: bookseries@publicanthropology.org with the relevant material enclosed as attachments.

Naomi Schneider and Rob Borofsky, Co-Editors, California Series in Public Anthropology

The Center for a Public Anthropology is a non-profit organization that encourages scholars and their students to address public problems in public ways.