CFP: Language & Migration (USA)

ConferencesCall for papers: Language and Migration: Experience and Memory, MAY 7-9, 2020, New York City and Princeton University. Deadline: November 1, 2019.

Migration Lab: People and Cultures across Borders, Princeton University and The Study Group on Language and the United Nations announce a collaborative symposium on “Language and Migration: Experience and Memory” MAY 7-9, 2020.

  • Part I, New York City: Thursday May 7 to Friday May 8, noon, will consider how language affects the experiences of permanently or temporarily settled refugees and migrants, those in transit, and the larger population around them. Keynote Speaker: Ingrid Piller, Professor of Applied Linguistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

  • Part II, Princeton University:  Friday evening May 8 to Saturday, May 9, evening, will focus on memory in the cultural work of migrants and immigrants. Keynote Speaker: Viet Thanh Nguyen, Aerol Arnold Professor of English, University of Southern California, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Sympathizer.

Language is a vital, but underexplored, factor in the lives of migrants, immigrants and refugees. It has a direct impact on the experiences and choices of individuals displaced by war, terror, or natural disasters and the decisions made by agents who provide (or fail to provide) relief, services, and status. Distilled through memory, it shapes the fictions, poems, memoirs, films and song lyrics in which migrants render loss and displacement, integration and discovery, the translation of history and culture, and the trials of identity.

This interdisciplinary, international symposium on Language and Migration will examine the role of language in the lives and works of migrants.

CFP Language & Migration 2020 (USA)

ConferencesCall for Papers: Language and Migration: Experience and Memory, May 7-9, 2020. Part I, New York City: May 7-8. Part II, Princeton University:  May 8-9. Deadline: November 1, 2019.

Language is a vital, but often underexplored, factor in the lives of migrants, immigrants and refugees. It has a direct impact on the experiences and choices of individuals displaced by war, terror, or natural disasters and the decisions made by agents who provide (or fail to provide) relief, services, and status. And, distilled through memory, it shapes the fictions, poems, memoirs, films and song lyrics in which migrants render loss and displacement, integration and discovery, the translation of history and culture, and the trials of identity.

This interdisciplinary, international conference on Language and Migration will place the role of language in the lives and works of migrants in sharp relief. In Part One, to take place in midtown Manhattan, participants are invited to consider how language differently affects the experiences of several populations:  permanently settled refugees and migrants; temporarily settled refugees and migrants; and people in transit. These populations, in turn, are variegated by age and gender, literacy and educational attainment, culture and religion, and the political, economic and cultural contexts in which they seek to settle. Part Two of the conference will focus on memory in the cultural work of migrants and immigrants. On Friday evening the conference will resume at Princeton University with a reading by eminent faculty novelists in the Lewis Center for the Arts, followed on Saturday by a full-day symposium on memory, language, and migration. To foster conversation across disciplinary borders, participants are strongly urged to attend both parts of the conference

Princeton’s interdisciplinary Research Lab on “Migration: People and Cultures Across Borders” comprises both humanists and social scientists; accordingly, they invite proposals from a wide variety of disciplines, including comparative literature, history, translation studies and philosophy; political science, economics, education, sociology, and law; sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, interlinguistics and forensic linguistics, among other fields.

Princeton U: Director of Davis International Center (USA)

“Job
Director of the Davis International Center, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. Posted May 15, 2019, Open until filled.

Reporting to the Vice Provost for International Affairs and Operations, the Director of the Davis International Center (Davis IC) provides leadership and management for a dynamic 14-person department that delivers comprehensive and specialized services that support the growth, development, and welfare of international students, scholars, and visitors at Princeton University.  The Davis IC also supports DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) students.  As of fall 2018, Princeton has 653 international undergraduate students (12% of undergraduates), 1,256 international graduate students (44% of graduate students), and 1,175 international scholars (postdocs, researchers, and faculty members).

Founded in 1974, the Davis IC provides immigration regulatory advising and processing, cultural adjustment, social enrichment, and assistance with practical matters related to living in the U.S.  It also acts as a center for cultural and educational programming that advances cross-cultural understanding, supports interaction between U.S. and international students and scholars, and promotes cultural competency across the University.

The successful candidate will be a committed and experienced leader with expertise in international education; a demonstrated history of successful management in higher education; and a commitment to the holistic development and support of diverse student and scholar populations.

Princeton U: Postdoc in Linguistics (USA)

“JobPostdoctoral Research Associate, Program in Linguistics, Princeton University, NJ, USA. Deadline: April 1, 2019 (for first review, with rolling deadline).

The Program in Linguistics at Princeton University invites applications for a post-doctoral (or more senior) research position in linguistics. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in formal semantics/pragmatics or prosody/intonation, and an interest in exploring the relationship between the two, experimentally and theoretically. The candidate may be invited to teach one course for Linguistics per semester, pending sufficient enrollments and with the approval of the Office of the Dean of the Faculty, and may engage in a small amount of undergraduate independent work advising. When teaching or advising, the successful candidate will carry a secondary rank of Lecturer. In addition, they will be expected to participate in the intellectual life of the Program in Linguistics. PhD in Linguistics or relevant discipline, preferably within the past five years but no later than September 1, 2019. This is a one-year term position starting September 1, 2019 with the possibility of renewal for a second year, based on continued satisfactory performance.

 

CITP/MiLab (Vienna) Doctoral Workshop

CITP/MiLab Spring 2015 Doctoral Workshop

The Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) at Princeton University and the Media Innovation Lab (MiLab) at the University of Vienna are pleased to announce our inaugural Doctoral Workshop to be held April 6th to April 8th, 2015 at Princeton University.

The workshop will be led by Ed Felten, the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs and Director of CITP at Princeton University, and Homero Gil de Zúñiga, who holds the Medienwandel Professorship in the Department of Communication and leads the MiLab at the University of Vienna.

The goal of the workshop is to provide a forum for leading doctoral students to present their late-stage research to experts in the field, receive feedback and advice, and gain exposure to related work in other disciplines. We seek to provide a helpful, interactive experience for students, to highlight the work of rising stars in this area, and to foster interdisciplinary collaboration.

Participants will be selected through a competitive review process. We expect to invite about 8 doctoral students to attend. We will provide support for travel and lodging up to $500 per attendee. Students are encouraged to submit dissertation relevant work; abstracts and shorter proposals will not be accepted.

Research topics should focus on the interplay between information and communication technologies and the social, political, civic, and governmental spheres. We welcome applications from doctoral students doing relevant work in any discipline, including communication studies, computer science, economics, political science, and sociology. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
– Citizen journalism
– Civic engagement and digital technology
– E-voting security
– Internet governance
– Open government data
– Privacy technologies for democratic ends
– Social media and political expression
– State-sponsored internet freedom programs

Submission process: Please submit your manuscript, along with your CV and full contact information, to Laura Cummings-Abdo and Meike Müller no later than February 1, 2015.

Fung Global Fellows, Princeton

Call for applications Fung Global Fellows Program
2015-16 Theme: Ethnic Politics and Identities

During the academic year 2015/16, the theme for the Fung Global Fellows Program will be “Ethnic Politics and Identities.”  Recent events around the world have highlighted the role of ethnic politics and identities in shaping domestic and international political arenas.  The Fung Global Fellows Program seeks applications from scholars who explore the causes, narrative modalities, and consequences of the politicization of ethnic, racial, and national divides from a comparative perspective.  Researchers working on any historical period of the modern age or region of the world and from any disciplinary background in the social sciences or humanities are encouraged to apply. For eligibility requirements and  further information see the application section of their website. Application deadline: November 1, 2014.

Fung Global Fellows, Princeton

Visting Research Scholar – Fung Global Fellows Program, Princeton University

Princeton University is pleased to announce the inauguration of the Fung Global Fellows Program at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS). Each year the Program will select six scholars from around the world to be in residence at Princeton for an academic year and to engage in research and discussion around a common theme. Fellowships are to be awarded to scholars employed outside the United States who are expected to return to their positions, and who have demonstrated outstanding scholarly achievement and exhibit unusual intellectual promise but who are still early in their careers.

During the academic year 2013/14, the theme for the Fung Global Fellows Program will be “Languages and Authority.” The Fellows and the accompanying seminar program will focus on how languages interact with political, social, economic, and cultural authority. Languages can be powerful tools for expressing and asserting authority. Yet they also constitute forms of authority in and of themselves (such as in the standardization and uniformity that they impose). Languages as forms of authority are also contested, and language communities have often formed a basis for resisting authority. Possible topics for this cycle of the fellows program include the ways in which languages and language use interact with globalization, empire, decolonization, nation-state formation, nationalism, language policy, language ideology, social stratification, migration, commerce and trade, social and religious movements, and the sociology of knowledge production.

NOTES:  6 openings. Employer will assist with relocation costs.
Additional Salary Information: Within the limits of its resources, it is the intent of the program to provide a salary that equals the normal salary paid to a fellow at his or her home institution. In cases where the fellow’s base salary scale is significantly below the norm, salaries may be adjusted upward to compensate.

The following information is provided by the employer in accordance with AAA policy. AAA is not responsible for verifying the accuracy of these statements. They are not part of the actual position description submitted for publication by the employer.
This employer does prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation/preference.
This employer does prohibit discrimination based on gender identity/expression.
This employer offers health insurance benefits to eligible same and opposite-sex domestic partners.
This employer does not appear on the AAUP list of censured institutions
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Requirements
Applications are due on November 1, 2012. We encourage applications from both social scientists and humanists concerning any region of the world or time period. To be eligible, applicants must have received their Ph.D. (or equivalent) no earlier than September 1, 2003. Fellowships will be awarded on the strength of a candidate’s proposed research project, the relationship of the project to the Program’s theme, the candidate’s scholarly record, and the candidate’s ability to contribute to the intellectual life of the Program. For more information on eligibility requirements and the application process itself, see the Program’s website. Princeton University is an equal opportunity employer and complies with applicable EEO and affirmative action regulations.