Pratha Shetty Profile

ProfilesPratha Shetty is an interculturalist based between France and India. She is an intercultural trainer with Ceran, in Paris and Ethnosynth, in Pune.

Pratha ShettyShe has been a visiting faculty member in EM Normandie in France and has conducted intercultural programs for Dassault Systemes, Naval Group, and Forvia, to name a few positions. Raised in a diverse country like India, Pratha was inspired by the cultural adaptability that people exhibited to function harmoniously. She wanted to be a catalyst in making intercultural interactions easier and that’s when she decided to be an interculturalist.

She is the host of a show called Intercultural Conversations. Her goal with the show is to help people understand each other by giving them cultural context. She is also the author of the children’s book When I Grow Up, which is an activity book that helps them learn about inspiring women from different cultures. 

For further details, see her LinkedIn profile.


Work for CID:
Pratha Shetty wrote Constructing Intercultural Dialogues #13: A Dialogue about Caste: Managing Uncomfortable Conversations.

Anagha Bhat-Behere Profile

ProfilesAnagha Bhat-Behere is Assistant Professor in the Department of Foreign Languages at Savitribai Phule Pune University in Pune, India.

Anagha BhatWhile her Ph.D. is in Russian, her specializations are in Linguistics, Lexicology, Translation Studies, and Comparative Literature. She founded the journal  Kelyane Bhashantar, dedicated to direct translations from foreign languages into Marathi, and served as Chief Editor (2011-2016).

She has published several translations of Russian literary works into various Marathi periodicals, and compiled a first of its kind tri-lingual Marathi-Russian-German dictionary. In addition, she has published 4 books individually, 4 books as co-author and more than 14 articles in national and international journals.

Published books translated from Russian into Marathi or Marathi into Russian:

Bunin, I. (2003). Sukhadol {A. Bhat & C. Ramdas, Eds. & Trans.). Pune, India: Rohan Prakashan.

Bhat, A. (Ed. & Trans.). (2008). Ot Pushkina do Chekhova Pune, India: Manovikas Prakashan. [Collection of stories by Pushkin, Schedrin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov into Marathi].

Lermontov, M. Y. (2011). Nayak eka pidhicha (A. Bhat, Trans.). Continental Prakashan. [Translation into Marathi]

Dragunsky, V. (2016). Denis chya goshti (part I,II, III) (A. Bhat, Trans.). Pune, India: Pioneer Prakashan. [Translation into Marathi]

Bhat, A. (Ed. & Trans.). (2017). Rasskazy [Collection of stories by various Soviet writers for children]. Pune, India: Chhatra Prabodhan Prakashan.

Gelasimov, A. (2020). Tahaan aani itar katha (A. Bhat, Trans.). Pune, India: Kalasakta. [Translation into Marathi]

Sathe, A. (2021). My journey to Russia (A. Bhat, Trans.) Pune, India: SPPU. [Translation into English and Russian]


Work for CID:

Anagha Bhat-Behere serves as a reviewer for Marathi.

Apurva Chaugule Profile

ProfilesApurva Chaugule is currently pursuing an Advanced Diploma in Japanese language at the Department of Foreign Languages (popularly known as Ranade Institute), at Savitribai Phule Pune University, in India.

Apurva ChauguleShe has passed the Japanese Language Proficiency Test at the N3 level. She completed her Bachelor’s degree in Mass Media, specializing in Advertising, at Ramanarain Ruia College, Mumbai, India.


Work for CID:

Apurva Chaugule co-translated KC17: Multilingualism into Marathi.

Sameer Patankar Profile

ProfilesSameer Patankar is a Senior Research Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate at the School of Communication Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.

Sameer PatankarHe is pursuing a doctorate in the area of intercultural communication, in addition to teaching at the post graduate level to students of Journalism and Mass Communication. His  research specializations are Intercultural Communicative Competence, Cultural Adoption, Cultural Assimilation, and Interpersonal Communication.

He passed the highly competitive NET exam (National Eligibility Test) in Journalism and Mass Communication. (This is the eligibility test for the post of Assistant Professor in Indian Universities and Colleges for Indian Nationals.) He was also awarded a Junior Research Fellowship for his doctoral education.


Work for CID:

Sameer Patankar co-translated KC17: Multilingualism into Marathi.

Fellowships for Research in India

FellowshipsFellowships (for dissertation students, researchers, and artists) for opportunities in India, American Institute of Indian Studies. Deadline: November 15, 2020.

The American Institute of Indian Studies announces its 2020 fellowship competition and invites applications from scholars who wish to conduct their research in India. Junior fellowships are awarded to Ph.D. candidates to conduct research for their dissertations in India for up to eleven months. Senior fellowships are awarded to scholars who hold the Ph.D. degree for up to nine months of research in India. The AIIS also welcomes applications for its performing and creative arts fellowships from accomplished practitioners of the arts of India.

• Junior Fellowships are for graduate students conducting research for their doctoral dissertations in India.

• Senior Long- and Short-term Fellowships are for those holding the PhD degree.


• Performing and Creative Arts Fellowships are available to accomplished practitioners of the arts to conduct their projects in India.

The AIIS fellowship competition is not restricted to those from its member institutions. Non-U.S. citizens may apply as long as they are either graduate students or full-time faculty at colleges and universities in the United States. Approximately 35 fellowships are awarded each year.

AIIS also offers intensive, immersion-based language training in India to students from American universities. Summer and academic year programs focus on language acquisition and cultural understanding.

CFP IAICS: Diversity & Multiculturalism (India)

ConferencesCall for papers, 26th International Conference of the International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies: Diversity and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Times,  May 28-31, 2020, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India. Deadline extended: December 15, 2019.

As we move further into the 21st century, issues of diversity and multiculturalism are becoming increasingly complex. The constant flows of persons, cultures, and ideas between and among nations not only intensify contact and connection among global citizens but also bring to the surface both emergent and perennial issues of difference, identity, territory, and environmental concerns. With expansive networks moving at breakthrough speeds and intensities, the very concepts of diversity and multiculturalism are changing, especially as they encounter forces of environmental change, nationalism, populism, and hegemony. What does it mean to live in a multicultural society?  How do we create community, resolve conflicts, in complicated religious, linguistic, educational, and cultural contexts?  What happens to minorities and indigenous peoples within larger majority cultures? The theme of this conference seeks to address these issues in the context of nations and the larger world.

Conference Working Language: English.

CFP IAICS: Diversity & Multiculturalism in Contemporary Times (India)

ConferencesCall for Papers: International Conference of the International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS), May 28-31, 2020, Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE), Manipal, Karnataka, India. Deadline: November 20, 2019.

Conference Hosts: MAHE, India, and University of Louisville, USA
Conference Theme: Diversity and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Times

As we move further into the 21st century, issues of diversity and multiculturalism are becoming increasingly complex. The constant flows of persons, cultures, and ideas between and among nations not only intensify contact and connection among global citizens but also bring to the surface both emergent and perennial issues of difference, identity, territory, and environmental concerns. With expansive networks moving at breakthrough speeds and intensities, the very concepts of diversity and multiculturalism are changing, especially as they encounter forces of environmental change, nationalism, populism, and hegemony. What does it mean to live in a multicultural society? How do we create community, resolve conflicts, in complicated religious, linguistic, educational, and cultural contexts? What happens to minorities and indigenous peoples within larger majority cultures?

The theme of this conference seeks to address these issues in the context of nations and the larger world.

ICA Regional: Communications Research in the Digital Age (India)

ConferencesInternational Communication Association South Asia Regional Conference 2017: Communications Research in the Digital Age, 14 to 16 December 2017, Mumbai, INDIA, Hosted by SNDT Women’s University. Abstract due: August 31, 2017

The ICA South Asia regional conference intends to examine communications research in digital age under four parallel tracks for paper presentation:

A. Individual and Digital Exposure (IDE): What is the relationship of individual with the digital media?

B. Gender, Culture Technology (GCT): How does community and technology intersect in a given culture?

C. Digital Media Ecology (DME): Who are the stakeholders and players of digital media landscape?

D. Digital Research Methodologies (DRM): What are methodological challenges for digital media research?

We recognize that all the themes are intersecting and can be interwoven, yet we expect that you choose ONE that you think is nearest to your research/panel so that regional interest groups can be formed towards the end of the conference. By submitting abstract you are agreeing to register for the Conference. There will be workshops as well as plenary at the Conference.

Amritsar: Conflict & Harmony

Guest PostsAmritsar: Conflict and Harmony
Guest Post by Linda J. de Wit

Amritsar is a medium-sized city in India serving as a tourist destination for two main reasons. First, it is the location of the holiest temple of the Sikh religion; second, it is the closest city to the Wagah border crossing with Pakistan where thousands of visitors assemble to watch the ceremonial closing of the gates every day.

The city and its surroundings have great significance in the history of Partition and the border ceremony is probably the most tangible example of the persistent tensions between the countries separated in 1947. In a remarkably aligned military drill, soldiers on both sides parade up and down, accompanied by hostile looks, aggressive hand gestures, and kicks so high they are basically standing splits. The audiences cheer every move in what almost looks like a dance-off.

When the two flags simultaneously are lowered, a single brief handshake takes place before the border gates are violently slammed shut in the neighbor’s face. The crowds applaud and shout patriotic slogans. The ceremony is a joyful event with music and dancing, having the atmosphere of a sports game. The souvenirs on the Indian side signal that the subject matter is more serious, as they boast about the “world’s largest border guarding force.” Most visitors have probably never been, and will never go, to the other side.

Back in the city, one can visit the Partition museum, the only one in the country. It recounts how the division of British India along religious lines caused millions of people to leave their homes. Amritsar’s train station saw refugees leaving in both directions, as well as packed trains arriving with no one alive, attacked because they were Muslims or Hindus.

A stone’s throw from the museum is a walled garden, Jallianwala Bagh, where a massacre took place by British forces among peaceful protesters in 1919. Gatherings had been forbidden and, without providing a warning, soldiers opened fire on the crowd for ten minutes, killing hundreds. This was one of the events that nourished the independence movement in India.

The city’s main attraction, however, is a different place, drawing more visitors than the Taj Mahal: the Golden Temple. It is the spiritual center of Sikhism because it is where the original version of the religion’s holy book lies. The Temple’s four doors symbolize that people from east, west, north and south can enter the place, irrespective of caste, creed and sex: Sikhism’s fundamental values include absolute equality and the unity of humankind.

The free information booklets distributed around the Temple describe how Sikhism holds that, in essence, all religions are an expression of the same fundamental truth. The founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak (1469-1539), strove to bring Hindus and Muslims together: “his life and teachings were a symbol of the harmony between the two communities.”[1]

The peaceful ambience of the Temple complex is a heartening change from the city’s gloomier connotations. Tears may spring to the visitor’s eyes, due to mountains of onions being peeled by countless volunteers: every Sikh place of worship has a common kitchen distributing free meals. At the Golden Temple some 75,000 people per day share the same food, sitting together in a row on the floor.

For the moment, such harmony is, on a larger scale, still something to strive for. Last December, the Heart of Asia peace summit took place in Amritsar, but India and Pakistan did not successfully initiate a dialogue process.[2]

The significance of Amritsar in history, as in the present, remains ambiguous. The city is the backdrop of some of the most intense examples of failing intercultural and interreligious dialogue and the consequences thereof. At the same time, as the capital of Sikhism, the city is imbued with the inclusive philosophy of tolerance and unity. For all its contrasts, Amritsar ultimately is a symbol of hope of a better future.

[1] Dr. Sir Radhkrishnan, as cited in: Singh Shan, H. (2015). Sri Guru Granth Sahib. The Unique and Universal Scripture. Dharam Parchar Committee.

[2] http://www.atimes.com/inod-pak-dialogue-process-fails-launch-amritsar/

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Saveetha U Job Ad: Dean of International Affairs (India)

Dean – International Affairs
Saveetha University
Expires: 31st October 2016

Position Summary
Saveetha University seeks to appoint a Dean for International Affairs at Saveetha University, Chennai, T.N, India.

Key Responsibilities
• Provide university-wide leadership to various areas in order to internationalize the University including research, outreach, culture, diversity, curriculum, partnerships, grants, and entrepreneurial activities.
• Provide direct supervision to international affairs staff and coordinate with other supervisors regarding dual reporting roles.
• Establish an action plan to implement strategic initiatives and international activities.
• Communicate and collaborate with various internal and external constituents.• Represent the university in dealings with foreign partners and manage relationship with foreign partners.
• Represent the university to agencies on matters relating to International Affairs; seek grants and resources from external agencies to fulfill the university’s vision.
• Create collaborative programs pertaining to international student and their issues
• Attend and be visible/present in events/programs on campus that are relevant to international student and their issues
• Outreach to other student organization, academic colleges and administrative areas addressing similar issues including, but not limited to, Diversity Development, Intercultural Student Services, the Cultural Resource Centers, University Housing and Dining Services related to international students and faculties.
• Be a student advocate for international affairs and strive to create a safe, open environment
• Work closely with the Directors of Government Relations issues and policies concerning international students in higher education.
• Conduct research projects, such as surveys, petitions and focus groups in order to gather student concerns and interests. 

Education & Experience Requirements
• Phd. from any discipline related to Engineering, Technology, Health Science, Law & Management.
• Should have served as Senior Faculty for minimum of 10 yrs. in a reputed University.
• Should have exposed to international academic societies and culture.
• Should be able to best represent the university to international communities, students and faculty members in line with the goals of the university.
• Should be a person with universal personalities including rich interpersonal skills, understanding on different cultures and people from different ethnic origins and international legal frameworks related to academics.

Interested persons may send in their detailed C.V to:
The Registrar, Saveetha University, 162 Poonamallee High Road, Chennai – 600 077
Email: registrar[at]saveetha.com

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