Institut Français de l’Éducation

On September 26, 2011, I presented a talk entitled “’A Curious Mixture of Passion and Reserve’: Understanding the Etic/Emic Distinction” to Prof. Christine Develotte‘s doctoral seminar at the Institut Français de l’Éducation, which is part of the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon in France. Other faculty who participated in the discussion were Prof.  Jacques Cosnier, and Dr. Nicholas Guichon. The presentation described a manuscript in preparation with Christina Hahn (a recent Master’s student at the University of Duisberg-Essen, Germany) and Prof. Jane Jorgenson (University of South Florida). My thanks to Prof. Develotte for organizing the event and to the students for being a great audience.

On October 13-14, 2011, I was one of the respondents to a panel at Journées d’étude ViSA, presenting a paper entitled “A Metacomunicative perspective on the ViSA group analysis of data.” I am also on the Conseil scientifique of ViSA (Vidéos de situations d’enseignement et d’apprentissage), so in addition to participating in the 2 days of activities, I was part of the group discussing next year’s event and other future plans. My thanks to Andrée Tiberghien for again including me in ViSA. Other researchers who are involved are too numerous to mention as this is a group of several dozen scholars across France, with additional participants from Switzerland and Spain.

On October 17, 2011, I presented “Integrating new technologies into higher education pedagogy in the United States: What problems do they solve? What problems do they create?” as a public lecture at IFE. Prof. Denis Bédard (from the University of Sherbrook, Canada) was the other international speaker. My thanks to Profs. Catherine Loisy and Eric Sanchez for organizing the event, and to the participants for excellent questions.

IFE logo

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue

MA in Cultural Policy and Management

MA programme in Cultural Policy and Management
Interculturalism and Mediation in the Balkans

The University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia, in cooperation with the University Lyon 2, France is organizing a joint MA programme in Cultural Policy and Management (Interculturalism and Mediation in the Balkans). This MA programme, taught in English and French, has gained an international reputation. Accredited by the University Lyon 2 and supported by other partner universities, professional organizations and guest experts from all over Europe, it attracts not only students from the Balkan region but also those coming from Europe and worldwide, who seek a new, stimulating and different study environment.

This programme enables students to be part of a creative capital and multicultural landscape of the Balkans. For its excellence in the promotion of intercultural cooperation and mediating capacities of culture, the MA in Cultural Policy and Management has been named UNESCO Chair in 2004.

The programme is implemented through lectures, project making, research based learning, problem solving, small group work, individual and group tutorials, internships in France and Balkan countries, seminars and workshops designed to help the student develop wider contextual understanding, research skills and awareness of professional issues.

Interested candidates are invited to apply by 13-15 June 2011 and 19-20 September 2011 respectively. For more information, please visit http://www.arts.bg.ac.rs/rektoraten/stud/?id=infobuduci

Globalization conference 2012

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Communicating in a World of Norms: Information and Communication in Contemporary Globalization
Lille, France, March 7-9, 2012

Lille is located in Northern France and it takes 50 minutes by train to get to this beautiful city from the Charles de Gaulle airport (CDG), one of the two main Paris airports. For more information about Lille, please visit http://www.mairie-lille.fr/en

We hope that you will be interested in participating in this international event, which is co-sponsored by ICA [International Communication Association], the GERIICO [Group of studies and research on information and communication] and the SFSIC [French Society for Information and Communication Sciences]. It is the first time that ICA is sponsoring such an event in France, which will help us develop stronger scientific relationships between communication scholars all around the world.

The deadline to submit your 1,000 word abstract is September 30, 2011.

The proposals must without fail be submitted in French or in English. The main conference site is in French. Information about the conference is English is available here.

The authors will get an answer at the beginning of December 2011. Please see the attached APPEL A COMMUNICATIONS CMN (US) for more details.

Looking forward to seeing you there!
François Cooren, PhD
Past president (2010-2011)
International Communication Association

Border crossings conference

International Interdisciplinary Conference
Border crossings: bridging disciplines and research agendas

10 June 2011, 9:00 – 18:30
Aix-Marseille Institute for Advanced Studies (IMéRA), Salle de conférence de la Maison des Astronomes, Marseille, France

KEYNOTE ADDRESS (6pm)
Michèle Lamont, Harvard University
“Boundaries, recognition, social resilience, and other keys to successful societies”

“Over the past two decades, a gap has developed in the field of border crossing studies between scholars studying the building of walls and those caring about bonding and bridging, the division of labor sometimes reflecting disciplinary boundaries, with sociologists and anthropologists and social theorists enthused by “transnational practices” and legal scholars, political scientists and political philosophers worried about securitization and control before and at the border. There are signs that scholars interested in border control policies and those interested in flows across borders could not durably ignore one another. In France, there has been some recent work by anthropologists interested in borders and mobility (eg the French National Funding Agency Frontières project). In the US, after ignoring or deprecating policies, there has been an evolution and more emphasis has been put on the implementation of policies and local policy practices that affect migrants’ experience, strategies or quality of life (eg Light 2006).

It is time to study exactly how bordering, rebordering, bridging and bonding interact. What are the national and local policies that affect migrant practices? How have border control policies affected migrants’ social strategies, economic achievements and cultural practices? How do non-state actors and organizations assist migrants in bridging the ‘here’ and ‘there’ despite new forms of border enforcement?  How do efforts of internal rebordering and differentiation between members ‘of’ and persons ‘in’ the polity affect post-migration experiences and the emergence of bonding in the long term? How do the changing strategies of sending states vis-à-vis emigrants and the governments of their host countries influence the dynamics of bridging and bonding?  How do these effects vary depending on the life cycle of the individual and the family, the type of legal status and the forms of ethnicization and racialization migrants endure?

Answering these questions is challenging from a theoretical, analytical and methodological perspective.

Theoretically, a fruitful dialogue could emerge between scholars interested in cultural and social boundaries, those working on legal/state borders and their legitimacy, and those concerned by “transnational citizenship” (Bauböck 1994).

Analytically, we need to identify policies that may affect migrant flows in the home and destination countries and the type of life experiences affected by policy or legal frameworks. This should allow us to devise an analytical framework to understand the variety of policy/practices matrices and the factors that explain variation. In this way, we could empirically study whether and under which circumstances migrants take into account, ignore or circumvent policies.

Research design will also be a challenge. One needs to take into account the interaction of different levels of analysis. Individual decisions to migrate are often helped by meso-level organizations and infrastructures and take place within regional migration systems, yet they also depend partly on macro trends, and the structure of the “globalized” economy cannot be ignored. Once arrived, migrants’ experience may vary from one city or state to another depending on the enforcement of national or federal policies. Data collection is also an issue.  Large-scale surveys are typically produced within national boundaries and issued by national public authorities. This “methodological nationalism” is compounded by the relative lack of data in countries of emigration. While qualitative studies do not face this problem, they face others such as sample selection of interviewed migrants, and access to informants involved in intergovernmental negotiations.

This one day conference will bring together scholars from different disciplines that study border crossings and bridgings to discuss these theoretical, analytical and empirical challenges and open new research agendas.”

For further details, see the original post.

Study abroad-Italy, Turkey, France

Undergraduate and Graduate global communication opportunities this summer in Florence, Cagli and Urbino, Italy; Istanbul, Turkey; and Perpignan, France.

For the 10th year we will be taking students from around the country to Europe to participate in Backpack Journalism and Leadership courses.

Florence, Italy (Grad. students only):
Renaissance Rhetoric – May 27 – June 10
Renaissance Leadership – May 27 – June 10
Project Management Italy – June 10 – June 24

Cagli Project Italy – Grad. and Graduating Seniors only
Intercultural and Global story writing and Multimedia June 23 – July 9

Urbino, Italy:
Multimedia Journalism and Magazine Publishing June 9 – July 7

Perpignan, France:
Multimedia Journalism June 23 – July 23

Istanbul, Turkey:
Multimedia Journalism June 23 – July 21

For details of Graduate Communication and Leadership courses.
For the Gonzaga-in-Cagli Project.
For Graduate internship opportunities in each site.
For full program descriptions and undergraduate applications to Istanbul, Turkey; Urbino, Italy; or Perpignan, France.

Student participants come from many universities. The Department of Communication and Leadership Studies at Gonzaga is the host University for all graduate credits.

Email caputo@gonzaga.edu for more information.
John S. Caputo, Ph. D.
Professor of Communication and Leadership Studies
Distinguished Walter Ong, S.J. Scholar
Department of Communication and Leadership Studies
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA. 99258-0001
Tel: 509-313-6656

Walls and bridges

Walls and Bridges: Translatlantic Insights
“We build too many walls and not enough bridges.”
Isaac Newton

Over the course of three 10-day series, in the winter, spring and fall of 2011 in New York City, Walls and Bridges—a program curated by the Villa Gillet (director: Guy Walter) and presented by the Conseil de la Création artistique (general representative: Marin Karmitz)—will present nearly 50 cultural events, combining about 100 speakers and artists, 30 partners and over 20 venues, ranging from the New York Public Library, Joe’s Pub and the Brooklyn Flea to bookstores, universities and various galleries.

• Season 1 : From Thursday, January 27th to Friday, February 4th 2011
• Season 2 : From Tuesday, April 12th to Thursday, April 21st 2011
• Season 3 : From Thursday, October 20th to Sunday, October 30th 2011

Speakers and Artists
Great thinkers from France and across Europe paired with the most important American writers, thinkers and performers.
Friday, January 28
Art/Truth/Lies: The Perils and Pleasures of Deception
1:00pm | Round-table
D. Graham Burnett, Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Jean-Pierre Dupuy, Carrie Lambert-Beatty, Glenn D. Lowry
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
The Magical Side of Celebrity
6:00pm | Round-table
Cécile Guilbert, Laura Kipnis, Wayne Koestenbaum
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
Three Faiths in the Form of a Fugue
8:00pm | Performance / discussion
Salman Ahmad, Reza Aslan, Ala Ebtekar, Dan Fishback, Dan Fishback, Dan Fishback, Fabrice Hadjadj, Alicia Jo Rabins, Shirin Neshat, Damien Poisblaud
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
Saturday, January 29
The End of Privacy: The State and Surveillance
2:30pm | Round-table
Didier Bigo
, Mireille Delmas-Marty, Jeffrey Rosen
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
The New Faces of the Enemy

5:00pm | Round-table
Scott Atran
, Grégoire Chamayou, Ariel Colonomos, Philip Gourevitch
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
And the Pursuit of Happiness

7:30pm | Round-table
Barbara Cassin
, Daniel Handler, Maira Kalman, Sophie Wahnich
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
Sunday, January 30th

From Fiction to Philosophy
1:00pm | Discussion
Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Rick Moody, Avital Ronell, Benjamen Walker
Greenlight Bookstore
Fair for Knowledge: Hair
2:00pm | Fair
Laurel Braitman
, Barbara Cassin, Cécile Guilbert, Justin E. H. Smith, John Strausbaugh, Sophie Wahnich
The Brooklyn Flea
Monday, January 31st

Picturing the Self: A Philosopher Discusses a Photographer’s Work

6:30pm | Discussion
Pierre Cassou-Noguès
, Jen Davis
Aperture Gallery
Going Public: Embodying a Persona

9:00pm | Reading and performance
Cécile Guilbert
, Cynthia Hopkins, Sarah Jones
Joe’s Pub
Tuesday, February 1st

Hunter VS. Hunted: A Philosopher Discusses Short Media Pieces

7:00pm | Screening and discussion
Grégoire Chamayou
, Jamie Hook, Katie Salen
UnionDocs
Wednesday, February 2nd

Catastrophe Practice (1/3)

7:00pm | Round-table
Jean-Pierre Dupuy
, Jonathan Lear, Michel Lussault, Josh Neufeld
The New School – John Tishman Auditorium
Thursday, February 3rd

Starting From Here: Every Place Tells a Story

7:30pm | Discussion
Reif Larsen
, Michel Lussault, Peter Turchi, Philippe Vasset
French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) – Le Skyroom
Friday, February 4th

The Shapes of Space – The Shears of Time: Why Does Philosophy Need Art to Become Truly Experimental?

6:30pm | Round-table
Brody Condon
, Elie During, Patrice Maniglier, McKenzie Wark
The New School – Theresa Lang Center

Multiculturalism as a solution, not a problem

“German Chancellor Angela Merkel recently made headlines when she pronounced multiculturalism in Germany a failure. Shortly before, a Globe and Mail editorial argued that Canadians should eradicate “multiculturalism” from their vocabulary and refocus on “citizenship.” Multiculturalism isn’t just out of style, these statements suggest – it’s dangerous for building unity in increasingly diverse societies.

Unfortunately, both analyses are dead wrong.

Social scientists can measure multiculturalism in a given society by examining the number and content of public policies and government pronouncements around cultural recognition and accommodation. Such indices show that Germany is not, and has never been, a multicultural society.

Multiculturalism can’t have failed in Germany because it was never tried. Turkish guest workers and other immigrants were never welcomed as future citizens – only as temporary labour. If Germans are now concerned about the consequences, the blame certainly doesn’t lie with multiculturalism.

These indices also group countries such as France and Norway with Germany as least multicultural, Sweden, the Netherlands and the United States as moderately multicultural, and Australia and Canada as most multicultural.

Have Canada’s past practices and policies hurt attempts to forge common citizenship out of diversity?

Absolutely not.”

For further details, see the original article by Irene Bloemraad in the Canadian newspaper, The Globe and Mail.