Key Concept #73: Argumentative Dialogue Translated into Russian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing with translations of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting the translation of KC73: Argumentative Dialogue. Sara Greco wrote this in English for publication in 2015, and Viktoryia Hramadka has now translated it into Russian. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC73 Argumentative dialogue_ RussianGreco, S. (2017). Argumentative dialogue (Russian). (V. Hramadka, trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 73. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/kc73_russian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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Key Concept #73: Argumentative Dialogue by Sara Greco

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

Key Concept 73 Argumentative Dialogue by Sara Greco

Greco, S. (2015). Argumentative dialogue. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 73. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/kc73-argumentative-dialogue.pdf 

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Sara Greco Researcher Profile

Sara GrecoSara Greco is Assistant Professor of Argumentation at the Università della Svizzera italiana (Lugano, Switzerland). Her research interests cover different aspects of the analysis of argumentative interactions, both written and oral. In particular, she has been working on the role of argumentation in conflict resolution, specifically in relation to dispute mediation (Greco Morasso 2008, 2011). In her view, argumentative dialogue can be seen as a means to solve disagreement and, thus, as an alternative to conflict.

More recently, Sara Greco has been working on inner conflict and how people make their decisions on the basis of dialogue with themselves. She has been working in particular with the case of how international migrants make their crucial migration decisions (Greco Morasso 2013, Greco 2015). At the moment, she is involved in a research project on children’s argumentation (Perret-Clermont et al. 2015).

In her work, Sara Greco has developed specific concepts of argumentation theory, in particular argument schemes (Rigotti & Greco Morasso 2010); she has equally been analysing specific cases of communicative interaction in different contexts, using methods from Discourse Analysis, argumentation and linguistic semantics-pragmatics.

Sara Greco is on www.academia.edu and www.researchgate.net. Her institutional website can be found here: http://search.usi.ch/people/28e36cfec1c93ec14e5b0879cd5311e1/Greco-Sara/publications

A selection of her recent publications includes:

Greco Morasso, S., Perret-Clermont, A.-N., and Miserez, C. (2015). L’argumentation à visée cognitive chez les enfants. In N. Muller Mirza and C. Buty (Eds.), L’argumentation dans les contextes de l’éducation. Bern: Peter Lang, pp. 39-82.

Greco Morasso, S. (2015). Argumentation from analogy in migrants’ decisions. Proceedings of the ISSA Conference, Amsterdam, July 2014. Ed. B. Garssen et al.

Xenitidou, M., and Greco Morasso, S. (2014). Parental discourse and identity management in the talk of indigenous and migrant speakers. Discourse & Society 25 (1): 100-121.

Greco Morasso, S. (2013). Multivoiced decisions. A study of migrants’ inner dialogue and its connection to social argumentation. Pragmatics & Cognition 21 (1): 55-80.

Greco Morasso, S., and Zittoun, T. (2014). The trajectory of food as a symbolic resource for international migrants. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 15 (1): 28-48.

Greco Morasso, S. (2011). Argumentation in dispute mediation: A reasonable way to handle conflict. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 291 pp.

Rigotti, E., and Greco Morasso, S. (2010). Comparing the Argumentum Model of Topics to other contemporary approaches to argument schemes: the procedural and material components. Argumentation 24 (4): 489-512.

Greco Morasso, S. (2008). The ontology of conflict. Pragmatics and Cognition 16 (3): 540-567.