Hebrew U Job Ad: Communication (Israel)

Job adsThe Noah Mozes Department of Communication and Journalism at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, tenure-track position, all areas of communication. Deadline: 26 September 2018.

Applicants must hold a Ph.D. degree at the time of hire, and demonstrate an active research program, indicating the potential for outstanding scholarship. The person hired will teach introductory and advanced courses in communications in their areas of specialization. He/she will also be expected to supervise Masters and Ph.D. students and to contribute to departmental and university service. Ability to teach in Hebrew is required.

Hebrew U Job Ad: Communication & Journalism (Israel)

Job adsHEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM
Department of Communication and Journalism
Tenure Track Position

The Noah Mozes Department of Communication and Journalism at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem invites outstanding candidates to apply for a tenure-track position starting July, 2018.

Applicants must hold a Ph.D. degree at the time of hire, and demonstrate an active research program, indicating the potential for outstanding scholarship. Ability to teach in Hebrew is required.

Deadline for applications: September 26, 2017.

Job Ad Hebrew University (Israel)

HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM
Noah Mozes Department of Communication and Journalism
Tenure-Track Position

The Noah Mozes Department of Communication and Journalism at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem invites outstanding candidates to apply for a tenure-track position starting July, 2017.

Applicants must hold a Ph.D. degree at the time of hire, and demonstrate an active research program, indicating the potential for outstanding scholarship. Ability to teach in Hebrew is required.

Deadline for applications: September 22, 2016.

Please see our website for additional information on the application process.

Multi/Cross-Cultural Education in Need of Paradigmatic Change

Multi/Cross-Cultural Education in Need of Paradigmatic Change
Guest post by Zvi Bekerman, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

As an educational anthropologist, I have been involved, for many years now, in the study of inter/cross-cultural encounters. At first doing ethnographic research on, rather short educational cross-cultural encounters, and for the last fourteen years following the activities of the integrated, bilingual Palestinian-Arab and Jewish schools in Israel. After so many years of continuous research I would have expected to have more clarity about the potential of these educational efforts to sooth conflict, yet I stay ambivalent. My ambivalence and, at times, my doubts have little to do with the qualities of those involved in the educational initiatives – teachers, principals, parents, students, supervisors and more. Any dissatisfaction I may sense has little to do with the quality of individual teachers or students and much to do with the quality of the systems we all cooperatively build for these educational initiatives to inhabit. This is not to say that these initiatives, as any other educational contexts might not benefit from a more critical approach to their implemented practices and their sustaining theories, it is just to make sure we understand that what could be considered unsuccessful practices are many times adaptive moves to local and global systemic circumstances we collectively create and sustain.

In this short note I want to point at some paradigmatic issues, which I believe if not dealt with, might stand in the way of allowing educational cross-cultural or multicultural efforts to contribute, even in a small way, to the improvement of relations among communities in conflict. These paradigmatic issues have to with the failure of multi/cross-cultural education to account for the primacy of national and psychologized educational perspectives in their theoretical analyses while failing to recognize the connection between their essentialist approach to identity and culture and their larger sociopolitical context, the nation-state. Theoretically I’m aligned with what has recently come to be identified as the ‘ontological turn’ in philosophy and the social sciences (Escobar, 2007; Kivinen & Piiroinen, 2004; Paleček & Risjord, 2013; van Dijk & Withagen, 2014), encouraging a move from the epistemological to the ontological.

The move starts by restoring the concept of identity/culture to its historical sources, thus de-essentializing it. It then points at the nation state as the definite product of modernity; a modernity that has produced a distinct social form, radically different from that of the traditional order of the past. This modernity is characterized by very specific forms of territoriality and surveillance capabilities that monopolize effective control over social relations across definite time-space distances and over the means of violence. The nation state can be viewed as a political socio-economic phenomenon that seeks to exercise its control over the populations comprising it by establishing a culture which is at once homogeneous, anonymous (all the members of the polity, irrespective of their personal sub-group affiliations, are called upon to uphold this culture) and universally literate (all members share the culture the state has canonized). Reflecting modern psychologized epistemologies upon which it builds its power, the nation state creates a direct and unobstructed relationship between itself and all its ‘individual’ citizens: not tribe, ethnic group, family or church is allowed to stand between the citizen and the State.

These moves produce new meanings which are then developed into a methodology – cultural analysis – that is to say the gaining of skills on how to read/describe the world through careful observation and recording of practical activity, which in turn allows for a shift from the individual or the socializing group as the crucial analytic unit for (educational) analysis to the processes and mechanisms of producing cultural contexts through social interaction. Finally, the process leads to a new articulation of major policy issues related no longer to identity/culture and its components (individual, texts, etc), but to the analysis of particular identities/cultures and how these are produced/constructed in the particular context of particular societies.

Looking at the world in this way, seriously and critically, means being open to finding new criteria through which to name categories and their phenomena. The process could be liberating in that it could bring about the understanding that identity/culture are not necessarily the right criteria through which to describe the world, its inhabitants and events; not that they do not necessarily exist or are only hegemonic constructs, but that though they are legitimate, they need not result in individual suffering.

When these elements are not accounted for in multi/cross-cultural educational efforts, they risk consolidating that same reality they intended to overcome. Multi/cross-cultural education is in urgent need of reviewing its paradigmatic foundations while problematizing the political structures which sustain the conflicts it tries to overcome.

We should not expect multi/cross-cultural educational initiatives to be able to offer solutions to longstanding and bloody conflicts that are rooted in very material unequal allocation of resources. Unfortunately, many times societies/governments find it easier to support such initiatives rather than work hard towards structural change. In my recent book, The Promise of Integrated, Multicultural, and Bilingual Education: Inclusive Palestinian-Arab and Jewish Schools in Israel (Oxford University Press, 2016), those interested will find the above arguments developed and expanded.

References

Escobar, A. (2007). The ‘ontological turn’ in social theory. A commentary on ‘Human geography without scale’, by Sallie Marston, John Paul Jones II and Keith Woodward. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 32(1), 106-111.

Kivinen, O., & Piiroinen, T. (2004). The relevance of ontological commitments in social sciences: Realist and pragmatist viewpoints. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, 34(3), 231-248.

Paleček, M., & Risjord, M. (2013). Relativism and the ontological turn within anthropology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences, 43(1), 3-23.

van Dijk, L., & Withagen, R. (2014). The horizontal worldview: A Wittgensteinian attitude towards scientific psychology. Theory & Psychology, 24(1), 3-18.

 

Hebrew University of Jerusalem job ad (Israel)

Tenure-Track Position in Communication and Journalism – 2016

The Noah Mozes Department of Communication and Journalism at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem invites outstanding candidates to apply for a tenure-track position starting July, 2016. Excellent candidates in all areas of communications are invited to apply. The successful applicant will join a dynamic research-oriented faculty offering innovative undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs. For more information about our faculty and research please visit the website.

Applicants must hold a Ph.D. degree at the time of hire, and demonstrate an active research program, indicating the potential for outstanding scholarship. The person hired will teach introductory and advanced courses in communications in their areas of specialization. He/she will also be expected to supervise Masters and Ph.D. students and to contribute to departmental and university service. Ability to teach in Hebrew is required (in exceptional cases, successful candidates will be expected to teach courses in Hebrew within a few years of their arrival).

Appointment procedures will be conducted in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Hebrew University and are subject to the approval of the university authorities. The university is not obliged to appoint any of the candidates who apply for the position. Applications should be submitted online.

Applications should include the following documents (each in a separate PDF file) in English:
•   Candidate’s letter of application (cover letter).
•   Detailed CV (including email address) according to the format of the Hebrew University.
•   Full list of publications according to the format of the Hebrew University. Please present each of the following as separate categories: books, articles in refereed journals, chapters in books, other publications.
•   Scientific biography outlining research and teaching interests and research plans for the next several years (3-4 pages long).
•   Names, addresses, affiliation, academic status, and email addresses of at least two referees qualified and willing to assess the candidate’s achievements and potential. The referees will upload their letters of recommendation directly to the system.
•   Copies of three selected recent publications that best showcase the candidate’s scholarship (these may also include accepted articles or book chapters).
•   Brief description of 3-4 potential courses that the candidate would be able teach.  For each proposed course please include the following information: Title, type of course, brief description, and specify whether the candidate has taught it before.
•   Teaching evaluations (if such exist).
Applicants will compete with candidates of other departments in the Faculty of Social Sciences for academic positions.

PLEASE ALSO SEND THESE DOCUMENTS IN ONE SINGLE PDF ATTACHED FILE.

Inquiries should be directed to:
Professor Ifat Maoz
Chair, Department of Communication,
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Deadline for applications: September 20, 2015.
In order to ensure that the referees’ letters arrive by the deadline, it is recommended to create an account in the application system as early as possible.

Hebrew University job ad (Israel)

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM
Department of Communication and Journalism
Tenure-Track Research and Teaching Positions

The Noah Mozes Department of Communication and Journalism at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem invites outstanding candidates to apply for tenure-track positions starting July 2015.

Excellent candidates in all areas of communications are invited to apply.

The successful applicant will join a dynamic research-oriented faculty offering innovative undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs.

The language of instruction is Hebrew, although English is acceptable for an initial period.

Applications should include:
*Detailed CV including full list of publications
*A scientific biography, including a research plan for the next several years, 3-4 pages long
*Letters of recommendation from at least two persons qualified to assess the candidate’s achievements and potential
*Copies of three selected recent publications that best showcase the candidate’s scholarship
*Brief description of 3-4 potential courses that the candidate could teach
*Teaching evaluations (if such exist)

Applicants will compete with candidates of other departments in the Faculty of Social Sciences for academic positions.

Application materials, letters of recommendation and/or inquiries should be directed to:
Prof. Esther Schely-Newman, Chair

Deadline for applications: September 15th 2014.

Study international reporting in Jerusalem 2014

SUMMER STUDY ABROAD IN JERUSALEM: INTERNATIONAL REPORTING
June 24-July 24, 2014
IEI Media * Hebrew University of Jerusalem
3 credits
Contact: Dr. Susan Jacobson

A meeting place of ancient and new, holy and secular, Jerusalem is a gathering spot for foreign correspondents from around the world. Get a taste of the global journalist’s life by studying with veteran Middle East correspondents; then go into the community to report your own stories. Learn international reporting techniques from a team of journalists, including NPR correspondent Linda Gradstein and former Christian Science Monitor reporter Ilene Prusher.

Jerusalem is one of the oldest cities in the world and a holy place for three of the world’s major religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Included in the program are trips to some of the most important sites in Jerusalem and Israel.

Students will live and learn at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a modern campus on Mt. Scopus. Undergraduate student will earn 3 transferable credits from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. GRADUATE CREDIT IS AVAILABLE.

IEI Media will offer other programs on various media-related topics in summer 2014 based in Italy, France, Northern Ireland, China, Spain, and Turkey.

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Give peace a dance

Maz Jobrani (an Iranian comedian) and Elon Gold (an Israeli comedian) have started an innovative humorous appeal for peace in the mideast, called Give peace a dance.

What would you do for peace?

Post your own dance for peace on YouTube tagged with #GivePeaceaDance.

Don Ellis-Fulbright

Don Ellis
University of Hartford

Fulbright to Israel

I spent a year in Israel as a Fulbright at Tel Aviv University in 2004-2005. I taught a course but also was doing research for my book on communication and ethnopolitical conflict which was published in 2006. It was a terrific experience and I recommend it to anyone especially if you can go for a longer period of time.

A Fulbright definitely requires planning. You can probably only go while on sabbatical and the application is due about a year before your actual sabbatical. Pay attention to the deadlines and make sure you apply for the proper time. Fulbrights are usually for research, teaching or combination of both. It depends on what the host institution wants. Getting a letter of invitation, a statement from the host institution that they want you, is invaluable. If you just apply in the blind your odds become very small.

In my case, I had been working in my area of expertise for quite a while and knew people at the host institution. I contacted them and requested a letter of invitation. But if you do not know someone then assert yourself and make some phone calls to see if you can actually get an invitation. The people at the host institution might have heard of your work or will become familiar with it after you apply. I applied for both the combination of teaching and research and this was agreeable to the host institution because they wanted courses taught as well as providing me with an opportunity to complete the book I wrote at the time.

Fulbrights are terrific experiences and worth the application hassle. But finding a way to make yourself known to the host institution, making contact with people at that institution and having that result in a letter of invitation is crucial.

Ifat Maoz

Researcher ProfilesIfat Maoz (Ph.D.) is a social psychologist, an associate professor in the Department of Communication, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and Director of the Smart Communication Institute at Hebrew University.

She has been a visiting scholar at the Psychology Department of Stanford University (1996) and at the Asch Center for Study of Ethnopolitical Conflict (originally based at the University of Pennsylvania, then at Bryn Mawr College, 2002-3, 2006-8). Her current main interests include psychological and media-related aspects in conflict and peace making, processing of social and political information and dynamics of intergroup communication in conflict.

She may be contacted via email.

Selected Publications

Maoz, I. (2004). Peace building in violent conflict: Israeli-Palestinian Post Oslo people to people activities. International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, 17(3), 563-574.

Maoz, I. (2004). Coexistence is in the eye if the beholder: evaluating intergroup encounter interventions between Jews and Arabs in Israel. Journal of Social Issues, 60(3), 403-418.

Maoz, I.  Bar-On, D. Bekerman, Z. and Jaber-Massarawa, S. (2004). Learning about ‘good enough’ through ‘bad enough’: A story of a planned dialogue between Israeli Jews and Palestinians. Human Relations, 57 (9), 1075-1101.

Maoz, I.; McCauley, R. (2005). Psychological correlates of support for compormise: A polling study of Jewish-Israeli attitudes towards solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Political Psychology, 26, 791-807.

Maoz, I. & Eidelson R. (2007). Psychological bases of exterme policy preferences: How the personal beliefs of Israeli-Jews predict their support for population transfer in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. American Behavioral  Scientist. 11.

Maoz, I. (2006). The effect of news coverage concerning the opponents’ reaction to a concession on its evaluation in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 11(4), 70-88.

Maoz, I. , Yaniv, I. & Ivri, N. (2007). Decision Framing and Willingness to make compromise in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Journal of Peace Research, 44 (1), 81-91.

Ellis, D. & Maoz, I.  (2007). Online arguments between Israeli-Jews and Palestinians. Human Communication Research, 33, 291-307.

Maoz, I., Bar-On, D. & Yikya, S. (2007). “They understand only force”: A critical examination of the erruption of verbal violence in a Jewish-Palestinian dialogue. Peace and Conflict Studies, 14(2), 27-48.

Maoz, I. & McCauley C. (2008). Threat , dehumanization and support for retaliatory-aggressive policies in asymmetric conflict. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 52 (1), 93-116

Maoz, I. & McCauley C. (2009). Threat perceptions and feelings as predictors of Jewish-Israeli support for compromise with Palestinians. Journal of Peace Research,46(4)

Maoz, I.  & Ellis, D. (2008). Intergroup Communication as a Predictor of Jewish-Israeli Agreement with Integrative Solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: The Mediating Effects of Outgroup Trust and Guilt . Journal of Communication, 58, 490-507 .

Maoz, I. (2008). “They watched a terrorist” responses of Jewish-Israeli viewers to an interview with a Palestinian terrorist. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology. 14(3), 275-290.

Maoz, I. (2009). The Women and Peace Hypothesis? The Effect of Opponent-negotiators’ Gender on Evaluation of Compromise Solutions in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. International Negotiation, 14, 521-538.

Maoz, I., Shamir, J., Wolfsfeld G. & Dvir, S. (2009). Psychological Correlates of Public Support for Reconciliation: The Israeli-Jordanian Case. Peace and Conflict Studies, 16(1), 31-42.

Maoz, I., Freedman, G., & McCauley, C.  (2010). Fled or expelled? Representation of the Israeli-Arab conflict in U.S. high school history textbooks. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 16(1), 1-10.

Ron, Y., Maoz, I.  & Bekerman, Z. (2010).Dialogue and Ideology: The Effect of Continuous Involvement in Jewish-Arab Dialogue Encounters on the Ideological Perspectives of Israeli-Jews. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 34(6), 571-579.

Selected Recent Publications 

Maoz, I., Freedman, G., & McCauley, C.I (2010). Fled or expelled? Representation of the Israeli-Arab conflict in U.S. high school history textbooks. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 16(1), 1-10.

Maoz, I. (2010). The asymmetric struggle for hearts and minds of viewers. Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict ,3(2), 99-110 .

Maoz, I. (2011).   Contact in protracted asymmetrical conflict: Twenty years of planned encounters between Israeli Jews and Palestinians. .Journal of Peace Research, 48(1), 115-125.

Maoz, I.. & McCauley, C. (2011). Explaining support for violating outgroup human rights in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: The role of attitudes toward general principles of human rights, trust in the outgroup, religiosity and intergroup contact. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 41(4), 889-903.