KC2 Cosmopolitanism Translated into Turkish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre-Denton wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Candost Aydın has now translated into Turkish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_TurkishSobre-Denton, M. (2022). Cosmopolitanism [Turkish]. (C. Aydın, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2022/02/kc2-cosmopolitanism_turkish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC2: Cosmopolitanism Translated into Arabic

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Mohammed Guamguami has now translated into French.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_ArabicSobre, M. (2022). Cosmopolitanism [Arabic]. (M. Guamguami, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2022/01/kc2-cosmopolitanism_arabic.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC2: Cosmopolitanism Translated into French

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Mohammed Guamguami has now translated into French.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_French

Sobre, M. (2021). Le cosmopolitisme. (M. Guamguami, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/06/kc2-cosmopolitanism_french.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism Translated into Spanish

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre-Denton wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which  Jhon Eduardo Mosquera Pérez has now translated into Spanish.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized alphabetically by conceptchronologically by publication date and number, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_SpanishSobre-Denton, M. (2021). Cosmopolitismo. (J. E. Mosquera Pérez, Trans.). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from: https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/02/kc2-cosmopolitanism_spanish.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

A Call to Cosmopolitan Communication

“BookJensen, A. (2020). A call to cosmopolitanism: A narrative of richness and mystery. Oracle, AZ: CMM Institute Press.

We are witnessing the emergence of a new form of communication.

Call to Cosmopolitanism cover

One with the potential to overcome the political polarization dominating our social landscape in recent decades. Cosmopolitan communication is one way of naming this emerging form and the promise it holds. In A Call to Cosmopolitan Communication, Arthur Jensen explores the dimensions, skillsets, and transforming potential of this new form, contrasting it with the all-too-familiar patterns of communication we experience as ethnocentric and modernistic tendencies.

Drawing on Pearce and Cronen’s enduring practical theory, the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM), Jensen focuses on the concept of mystery and our ability to co-produce narratives of richness that embrace our differences instead of simply assimilating, tolerating, or dismissing them.

A Call to Cosmopolitan Communication is not a call to arms but a call to human thriving. The call to human thriving is answered when we recognize that our lives are shaped in social interaction with others and that the quality of our communication with each other matters enormously. This book, along with Penman and Jensen’s previous work in Making Better Social Worlds, supports Cosmopolis2045.com, a companion project depicting one vision of a better social world that can emerge from a cosmopolitan mindset.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism Translated into Macedonian

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre-Denton wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Emilija Jovanovska has now translated into Macedonian.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_MacedonianSobre-Denton, M. (2020). Cosmopolitanism [Macedonian]. (E. Jovanovska, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/07/kc2-cosmopolitanism_macedonian.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC2: Cosmopolitanism Translated into Portuguese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre-Denton wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Filipa Subtil has now translated into Portuguese.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_PortugueseSobre-Denton, M. (2018). Cosmopolitismo. (F. Subtil, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Retrieved from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2021/05/kc2-cosmopolitanism_portuguese-v2.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism Translated into Greek

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#2: Cosmopolitanism, which Miriam Sobre-Denton wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Anastasia Karakitsou has now translated into Greek.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC2 Cosmopolitanism_GreekSobre-Denton, M. (2017). Cosmopolitanism [Greek]. (A. Karakitsou, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 2. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/kc2-cosmopolitanism_greek.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Gabriel Furmuzachi Profile

ProfilesGabriel Furmuzachi has a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Vienna (Austria).

Gabriel Furmuzachi

His academic work deals with issues such as multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism, language learning, communication and narrative identity. His present research interests gravitate around the idea of dialogue as a means of bringing cultures closer and of cosmopolitanism (both in its guise as identity and responsibility and as moral and institutional cosmopolitanism). He also has written essays about metaphors and emotions, the accommodationist use of reason in Canadian philosophy, the relationship between reason and nature, aesthetics and more.His non-academic work consists in surveying the international fine art trade (with emphasis on Eastern European art), buying and selling nineteenth and twentieth century paintings.

He is also involved in a series of projects spread on a wide cultural spectrum including, for example, Space and Place (a non-profit group based in Vienna, Austria, focused on urbanism and social interventions aiming at promoting cultural and social diversity in the city), Liternautica (a Romanian literature portal where he is part of the editorial team, encouraging young and established Romanian writers and building bridges between literary traditions) and Revista Timpul (where he is contributing with interviews and essays on various themes).


Work for CID:

Gabriel Furmuzachi wrote a guest post, Migration, Language and Dialogue, and conducted an interview: Vienna Coffeehouse Conversations: An interview with Eugene Quinn. He also translated KC1: Intercultural Dialogue, KC3: Intercultural Competence, and KC16: Migration into Romanian.

CFP Translation, Cosmopolitanism & Resistance

Journal of Communication and Culture

Theme: Translation, Cosmopolitanism & Resistance
Coordination: Maria Alexandra Lopes
Deadline for submission of original articles: 30th November 2014

Throughout history, translation has always been a site of multiple, often conflicting political, social and aesthetic agendas. Translation has diversely proven a pathway to conquering and steamrolling others into conformity, a locus of resistance and preservation of difference, as well as a space of dialogue between disparate worldviews. In either of these guises, translation has always had a powerful impact on different areas of human experience, from religion to science, from the media to politics, the economy and literature (Woodsworth and Delisle: 1995, 2012).

As an act of negotiation, translation is inextricably linked to processes of exchange of goods and ideas, cosmopolitization, hybridization and mobility (Cronin, 2002, 2010). Resistance, on the other hand, depicts a large array of attitudes, mentalscapes, emotions, political gestures that react against any given circumstance. ‘Resistance’ is taken here as a broad concept encompassing different meanings: on the one hand, the at times strong and/or violent opposition to something extant (the status quo, bigotry, censorship, ideology, globalization, etc.) or to come (new ideas, technology, value systems, etc.); and on the other hand, the ability to remain immune to something (other people, revolutionary trends, innovation, new ways of thinking, etc.). Thus, resistance may imply movement or immobility, creativity or epigone-like repetition, conservatism or unconventionalism with the decision to translate is often governed by one impulse or the other, depending on the degree of interest in change/preservation a given community evinces (Venuti, 2013).

The present issue of Comunicação & Cultura wishes to address and highlight modes of resistance and cosmopolitanism that translation may have promoted or facilitated down the ages and, especially, in the present time, thus reflecting upon the role and the effects of translation in different media, in the shaping of present-day politics and global economy, in acquainting a given culture with different patterns of behaviour, ways of life, narratives and geographies. As a potent tool for spreading ideas and ideologies, translation helps shape worldviews and social attitudes in indelible ways that need further investigation.

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