Danish Council for Independent Research Grants

Danish Council for Independent Research Call for Proposals Autumn 2015 and Spring 2016

The Danish Council for Independent Research (DFF) invites applications for grants towards research activities. DFF wishes to strengthen and develop the internationalisation of Danish research and the Council therefore welcomes applications that involve international activities. The objective is to give the best researchers and research groups the opportunity to coordinate and develop their research collaborations across country borders, and to give talented researchers the opportunity to spend periods abroad as part of their research careers. Consequently, aspects of internationalisation may form an element in applications for all of DFF’s instruments.

Details of the multiple types of grants available here.

AEJMC South Asian Initiative

South Asia Initiative AEJMCGreetings from the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Media and Journalism! By way of introduction, my name is Deb Aikat. I am a faculty member in UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Media and Journalism. Read my bio here.

In our commitment to the “Global Bridges” theme of the 2015 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) conference in San Francisco, a group of long-standing AEJMC members are convening the South Asia Initiative to bring together AEJMC members with interest and expertise in South Asia and the South Asian diaspora worldwide.

The AEJMC South Asia Initiative will foster cross-disciplinary conversations and collaborative relationships.

We invite you to the inaugural meeting:
~~ Time: 3:15-4:45 p.m., Aug. 7, 2015 (Friday)
~~ Place: Willow Room (B2 Golden Gate Level), San Francisco Marriott Marquis Hotel, San Francisco.
~~ See more details here.

We hope you’ll attend this meeting and share your ideas. Let us know if you are unable to attend the inaugural meeting, but wish to be a part of the AEJMC South Asia Initiative. We also welcome your ideas.

Please share this note with graduate students and colleagues interested in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Intercultural Bloggers wanted by Niagara Foundation

Niagara Foundation is searching for bloggers to contribute to their blog, The Falls. The Niagara Foundation is a Chicago-based nonprofit that focuses on fostering intercultural and interfaith dialogue, relationships and social cohesion. Bloggers would write about anything related to this mission from the perspective of their expertise. Contact Kathleen Ferraro at kathleen@niagarafoundation.org or 312-240-0707 Ext: 106 if you are interested in contributing in any capacity. Thank you!

Study of Internat’l students’ communication with host nationals

Collaboration request from Ioana Cionea, at the University of Oklahoma:
Participants needed for study on international students’ communication with host nationals

“We are currently conducting a longitudinal study in which we examine the factors that affect international students’ communication with host nationals. If you are an incoming international student (i.e., first semester in the United States) or if you know such students that you could forward this message to, we would appreciate your help with completing an online survey.

The survey has demographic questions, questions about expected communicate with host nationals, and anticipated experiences. Participation is completely voluntary. At the end of the survey, participants can enter a raffle to win Amazon gift cards.

If you have any questions or concerns about the research project you may contact any of the researchers on the team in the Department of Communication at The University of Oklahoma, an equal opportunity institution.”

Jackie Bruscella, M.A.
Bobbi Van Gilder, M.A.
Ioana A. Cionea, Ph.D.

African American expatriate survey

Collaboration request from Alyssa Hislop:

Research participants wanted! If you are African-American and have lived more than one year of your adult life either working, studying or living abroad, you can contribute to better comprehension of the life of the African American Expatriate and possible implications for racial identity by completing this online survey. The survey can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 1 hour. If there are any questions you may contact Alyssa Hislop, Principal Investigator.

Alyssa Hislop is a Master’s student at Andrews University in Michigan whose research paper is on African American Expatriates and how their racial identity may be affected while living abroad. She is asking that the CID help locate appropriate people to complete her survey.

CFP Affiliate Journal Initiative by ICA

New Affiliate Journal Initiative Developed for International Communication Association (ICA)
by Cynthia Stohl, Immediate Past President, University of California – Santa Barbara
(from ICA Newsletter for May 2014)

ICA has just announced the inaugural call for applications for ICA Affiliate Journal status. In January, 2014 the ICA Board established a new journal category, “Affiliate Journal.” An affiliate journal is published independently of ICA, in a language other than English, and meets or exceeds the general standards of an ICA journal and the specific standards developed for affiliate journals. Once approved by the ICA board, the affiliate journal will carry the ICA imprimatur and will be designated as such on the ICA website. An affiliate journal will be available to ICA members on line for free or at a discount.

The procedures and guidelines for this Affiliate Journal initiative will be operative for a trial period of three years. A maximum of two journals will be selected for this initial phase. For the first 2 years journal editors of the affiliate journals will provide the ICA Board with an annual report submitted one month before the annual meeting. During the third year a comprehensive formal review will be conducted by a specially appointed affiliate journal evaluation committee comprised of members of ICA’s Executive Committee and at least one appointed member from both the ICA board and the publication Committee. At that time the entire program will be evaluated, long term procedures for continued assessment and evaluation will be established, and decisions will be made regarding continuing affiliate status for the journal.

Rationale
The Affiliate Journal initiative serves several of the internationalization goals articulated by the EC and the ICA Board. Affiliate journals build bridges with the international communication community, connect our membership with research published in non- English high quality journals, help publicize the finest communication research done throughout the world, and give our members access to new and diverse audiences.

To be accepted as an affiliate journal, the editorial management must agree to publish extended abstracts of each article in every issue in English. Other efforts to share research not typically published in English are encouraged. An affiliate journal might for example, invite English language reviews of literature of research in a particular area that has not been readily accessible to most members of ICA. Efforts to enable ICA members to share their work with colleagues working in other languages are also highly desirable. Affiliate journals may, for example, publish interviews (both in English and the official language of the journal) with scholars who typically publish in a language other than the official language of the journal. On line or in print for free or at a discount, English language extended abstracts will be available for free online.

Application Procedures
Criteria for selection and the application form can be found here. If you have any questions please contact Cynthia Stohl, Chair, Affiliate Journal Committee at  or Michael Haley, ICA Executive Director.

Int’l scholars wanted: Society for History of Technology

Call for Nominations for International Scholars
Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), 2014

Each year the Society for the History of Technology designates up to four International Scholars for a two-year term. One of the goals of the International Scholars program is to foster an international network of scholars in the history of technology that will benefit all members of the Society. We particularly welcome applications from or nominations of scholars from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Graduate students, post-docs, and visiting scholars who are living and working in North America are not eligible to become International Scholars; however, they are eligible to apply once they return to their home countries.

Benefits and Support
International Scholars shall receive regular SHOT membership at no cost during their two-year term. At each annual meeting, SHOT will host a special gathering to welcome current International Scholars, introduce them to SHOT officers, and discuss with them SHOT’s international outreach and the international intellectual dimensions of our field.

International Scholars will participate in an email discussion list of all current International Scholars and the Internationalization Committee. Through the list International Scholars can seek support in writing paper abstracts for SHOT’s annual meeting and other activities in their task as ambassadors for the Society.

Conditions
As a condition of appointment, SHOT requires International Scholars to submit at least one paper proposal for SHOT’s annual meeting during their two-year term. While paper proposals from International Scholars will not automatically be accepted for the annual meeting, SHOT encourages the program committee to give these proposals special consideration.

SHOT also requires International Scholars to submit a travel grant application for each of the two SHOT annual meetings during the two years of their appointment. International Scholars receive highest priority for SHOT funding. Travel grant funds will help pay for travel expenses for International Scholars to attend the annual meeting and for basic conference registration, although not for lodging. For more information, please check the SHOT Travel Grant information page, available by link from either the SHOT annual meeting web page or the SHOT awards web page.

To inform the SHOT community about the state and developments of the history of technology in their regions, progress in disseminating information about the Society and stimulating scholarly activities in the history of technology, International Scholars commit themselves to at least one publication in the SHOT Newsletter or on the SHOT website.

Application
To nominate yourself or someone else as an International Scholar, please send a letter and a brief curriculum vitae to EACH member of the Internationalization Committee and to SHOT Secretary David Lucsko (shotsec [at] auburn [dot] edu). In the letter, please describe your goals in becoming a SHOT International Scholar, address the current state of history of technology in your home country and home institution, state how your position as a SHOT International Scholar will benefit the study of history of technology in your home country, and suggest what insights your research can bring to the SHOT community The deadline of 2014 nominations is April 15. New candidates will be selected and announced by the beginning of June. For more information about the application procedures, please visit our website.

2014 SHOT Internationalization Committee
Itty Abraham           (seaai [at] nus [dot] edu [dot] sg)
Sulfikar Amir           (SULFIKAR [at] ntu [dot] edu [dot] sg)
Francesca Bray     (francesca.bray [at] ed [dot] ac [dot] uk)
Yulia Frumer           (yfrumer [at] jhu [dot] edu)
Adam Lucas           (alucas [at] uow [dot] edu [dot] au)
Honghong Tinn       (hhtinn [at] gmail [dot] com)

Building bridges from theory to practice

I’m currently teaching a course on communication theory.  It’s an undergraduate class, one of those that’s designed to recruit majors.  Recently, one of my students, Joel, raised his hand in class.  You know the type:  he’s talkative, friendly and bright, a bit overbearing, and trying to figure out ‘what does it all mean’.  And that is precisely what he asked in the middle of a lecture/discussion on the importance of communication theory:  “But Miriam, what’s the point?  How does this stuff work in the real world?  Why should I care?”

It’s an age-old question, and one that students and teachers alike often struggle with, particularly in the social sciences and the humanities:  what is the connection between abstract, above-the-clouds theory and the pragmatic, day-to-day life we lead in the world?  But the question is, really, neither mundane nor naïve.  Indeed, I would argue that, in intercultural communication, this question is particularly important and yet woefully under-addressed.  We come up with all of these amazing theories to describe alienation, assimilation, identity processes, cultural difference—but we publish them in reputable journals and exorbitantly-priced textbooks and provide ‘in real life’ examples primarily at the undergraduate level.  Meanwhile, interculturalists who work in the world (outside of academic research), in such areas as refugee counseling, immigration, study abroad, international business, etc., are often working with little-to-no theoretical training, or with outdated approaches to difference such as the U-Curve or Iceberg models.

Where is the dialogue between theorists and practitioners?  What’s the point of doing such great and important work, on theories such as cosmopolitanism, hybridity, critical race theory, and others, if they are only accessible to other academics?  Those of us who identify as critical intercultural scholars are constantly talking about teaching others that difference should be embraced rather than feared, and yet here we are, talking in a language that is only accessible (literally, in terms of access to academic articles; and figuratively, in terms of being able to translate the academese we learn in graduate school) to a small portion of the population: those most like us.

In a discussion of intercultural dialogue, we would do well to listen to questions like Joel’s—the “how does this work” and “why should I care” questions.  If we are the idealists that the field really demands, then shouldn’t we be taking our work outside of the academy and applying it to those who need it, such as those who work with migrant populations, underserved urban youth, patients without health insurance, and on and on?  How can we build bridges between the important work that is done by university researchers and the communities we intend to serve?

I don’t propose that we stop building intercultural theory.  I think the work we do in intercultural research, particularly with today’s critical and postcolonial turns, is imperative to thriving in a world in which difference is coming closer to our doors rather than farther away.  However, with this divide between town and gown, between theory and practice, particularly in intercultural communication research, too much is lost in the translation.  I’d like to call for creative ways of applying academic theory to real world contexts, in ways that get our students jazzed about life beyond college, to see futures for their intercultural understandings of the world they learn in the classroom.  Programs such as Dr. Amy Stornaiuolo’s work with adolescent literacy, called Space2cre8, are heeding such calls, but there is room for so much more.  Students like Joel, those who understand that there could be more to theory than just memorization and regurgitation on an exam, can start to build these bridges, but only once we realize that our work needs to go further.  Let’s get this conversation moving outward, starting by answering Joel’s question:  “You should care because this work is essential to living in a multicultural world.”  This is the opening of our dialogue.

————————————————————–
Miriam S. Sobre-Denton
Assistant Professor | Intercultural Communication
Southern Illinois University Carbondale

msd

Digital humanities grants

Transatlantic program for collaborative work in the field of Digital Humanities

 

The Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (FMSH) is pleased to announce the launch of a new grant program in digital humanities. Thanks to a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, FMSH will co-finance transatlantic collaborative projects in the field of the digital humanities.

To strengthen its activity in the broad sphere of Digital Humanities, the FMSH seeks at present to implement a new international program of “digital philology”. To date, funded interactions in this area have been limited to exchanges within Europe. The purpose of this proposal is to create a formal organizational and funding structure for collaboration between the US and Europe in « digital literary studies ». For too long, Europe’s major projects in the digital humanities have been on a different track, as it were, from American projects. The present initiative is intended to help US and European researchers work together in an entirely new way in the field of digital literary studies, to share knowledge and methods, disseminate common practices and tools, and publicize their works.

The Program will support only research projects whose goal is to set up or to strengthen collaborations between US and European universities. It will co-finance up to 60% of the total cost of the research project per year.

Eligibility:
Grants are available to European and US universities willing to set up transatlantic collaborations. The competition is open to senior and junior researchers. The European groups will be asked to co-fund 40% of the total cost (total cost of the project can vary between $50,000 and  $100,000 per year. While the whole of Europe and North America is included in this call, priority will initially be accorded to applications originating in the U.S., France, Italy, Spain, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland.  Expenses for which grant funds may be requested include the following:

  • Visiting lectureships
  • Doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships
  • International seminars, symposia
  • Honoraria, travel and meeting expenses
  • Publications

Coverage of other expenses will be subject to negotiation with the FMSH.

Deadlines:

  • Applications due – March 31, 2014
  • Notification given – June 2014
  • Grant period commences – September, 2014

Before submitting a proposal, potential applicants are encouraged to contact the FMSH program secretary.

Application Form here

ATYA Azerbaijan youth group looking for partners

Fakhrinur HUSEYNLI writes:

We have had a youth NGO in Azerbaijan since 2002 which is interested in joining international projects and activities. If you wish, we are ready to sign partnership agreements to organize joint projects in Azerbaijan or send our active young participants to your coming activities in 2014 under Erasmus+ and other foundation programs.

If there are any small participation fees for your programs, our participants are ready to pay that amount. They will be glad to be part of your coming academic programs, workcamps, summer camps, internship, volunteer and training activities.

Thanks for your cooperation in advance. We are looking forward to cooperating with you in 2014.

Further information about ATYA:
Azerbaijan Tafakkur Youth Association (ATYA) is a national NGO working towards building better civil society. The organization is located in Absheron region (between Baku and Sumgait cities). ATYA has been mainly active in disseminating information on Human Rights Education, Peace Promotion and Civil Society Building. We look forward to creating local-international partnerships with great pleasure for organize fruitful and interesting projects for the sake of peace building, youth empowerment and civil society development.

The main purpose of ATYA is enlightenment, especially youth, on the social, scientific-cultural, legal spheres, to development thinking and to strengthen their role in civil society building.

Main activities:

  • Art and cultural exchange, conflict solution, intercultural learning and peace building;
  • NGO/Civil society and community building/development;
  • Youth empowerment, capacity building, apprenticeship and business education;
  • Advocacy, active citizenship, youth exchange and voluntarism;
  • Human rights education and promotion;
  • Healthy life style (HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria);
  • Environment and biodiversity education.

For more information on Azerbaijan Tafakkur Youth Association, ATYA, see this video.

Those interested in potential collaborations should contact:
Fakhrinur HUSEYNLI
Director of Institute for Peace & Dialogue

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