2020 Video Competition and Listening

CID Video CompetitionThis year’s CID Video Competition has as its theme listening, on the grounds that listening is how intercultural dialogue starts. In these days of the Coronavirus pandemic, a very different video on listening has been circulating. Despite the fact that it has no other connection to the competition, it is well worth watching. It is titled #Ascolta in the original Italian, and An imagined letter from COVID-19 to humans in the English. Perhaps it will give ideas to those who are preparing videos for the CID competition.

Video made by: Darinka Montico
Written by: Kristin Flyntz [link goes to complete text]
Music: Cold Isolation · David Fesliyan [link goes to the album]
Subtitle Edit: Iris Kalpouzou

CID Video Competition FAQ 2020

Job adsIn past CID Video Competitions, a number of questions have been asked. In hopes this will help others, they are posted here, along with answers. As new questions are asked, they will be added and answered. 

Please read the basic information for the CID Video Competition in 2020, including especially the entry rules, carefully! If submissions do not meet the requirements, they cannot be considered for a prize until and unless they are revised. When ready, submit your video. [Link for uploading to be added May 1]

But…coronavirus!
At this point the competition is still on, despite the pandemic. Some instructors have suggested this can be a particularly useful assignment for courses suddenly moved online. If there is a change, it will be clearly posted, but it is most likely to be an extended deadline rather than a cancellation. So go ahead and make your videos!

This year’s topic is listening. What does that entail?
Listening means paying attention to someone else rather than focusing on your own words and ideas. This is easiest with someone you know well, and hardest with a stranger, especially if that person shares few characteristics with you. But listening is the start of intercultural dialogue, so it’s important. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What exactly is intercultural dialogue, anyway?
The short answer: Intercultural dialogue requires at least two people from different cultural groups (so, it can be international, interracial, interethnic, or interfaith). It is active (people actually communicating in some way, having dialogue) rather than passive (knowledge in people’s heads). Here’s a longer answer: Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 1: Intercultural Dialogue. For more details, see this list of additional Resources.

What about intergenerational dialogue, is that intercultural as well?
NO, intergenerational dialogue within a single culture is not usually considered a form of intercultural dialogue. An argument could presumably be made, but that may be difficult given the short time limit for the video.

Can a group of students submit a video instead of one person?
Yes, absolutely. In fact, that is encouraged, as the perfect way to demonstrate listening to different points of view.

How many people maximum in a group are allowed?
Whatever works best for the students – and the instructor in a particular course if the competition is being used as a class assignment – will be fine. We’ve never set a limit.

Can faculty members participate?
NO, this is a competition for students only. Faculty members can serve as informal advisers or critics, and are certainly asked to encourage participation, or even require participation as part of a course if that suits their needs. But faculty members should NOT be part of the group that actually works on the video, and should NOT be the one submitting a video.

Can audiotapes be submitted in lieu of videotapes?
NO, sorry, audiotapes are NOT videotapes.

Where should videos be uploaded?
The link will be added by May 1. You will have to create an account when you get to the site, with your email, name, and a password. Videos should NOT be uploaded directly to YouTube or any other server, please!

Help, I don’t understand the directions when I get to the upload site!
You are asked to “Login or create an account.” The first time there, you need to choose “Create an account,” which requires providing your email address, first name, last name, and making up a password which you provide twice to confirm. Then click on “Register.” At that point you need to answer the questions on the application. If you don’t finish the first time, when you go back to the site, choose “Login” and then finish. Your email is your “Login ID” and the password is the same one you provided when you created the account.

My students are having difficulty submitting their videos. Can a faculty member help with this step?
YES, absolutely. The goal is to have student-created videos. There’s no problem with a faculty member helping to get those videos uploaded so they can be entered in the competition. However, please do NOT do it for them – the account should not be in the faculty member’s name. Let the student create an account, and then help as needed with any technical or translations issues.

My students created videos for this competition as a course assignment, so there are several different videos to be uploaded. Does each video need to be submitted separately?
YES, absolutely. Each video, whether created by one student or by a group of students, should be uploaded separately so it can be evaluated by the judges.

Four of us worked on a video together. Do we submit it once or 4 times?
ONLY ONCE! A group video should be submitted once, with all students who worked on the video being listed as creators. Choose a student who checks their email fairly often as the one to upload the video, so if there are any questions, they will see the email and be able to respond.

Can 30-minute videos be considered?
What part of “no less than 30 seconds, no more than 2 minutes” is unclear?

Is there a language requirement for the videos?
YES, the videos either must be in English or subtitled in English. Permitting other languages would imply having judges who know all the several dozen languages currently represented on the site, which would be impossible. However, choosing to have most of the video silent, with few words, or using another language with English subtitles, are appropriate ways to finesse the language requirement for those who are not native speakers.

Do the videos have to be live action?
NO, animation has been successfully incorporated into several submissions in the past. However, a PowerPoint slideshow is unlikely to result in an award, as that doesn’t make a very successful video.

I want to use video I made of a group singing a song in live performance. I have their permission, but not that of the copyright holder for that song. Is that fair use?

Unfortunately, the short answer is no, you would need permission of the copyright holder of the song. The long answer is that for all fair use questions, see the Documentary Filmmakers Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video; these and other such best-practices codes are available from the Center for Media and Social Impact.

CID VIdeo Competition Resources 2020

Job adsThe following resources discussing listening and intercultural dialogue are intended to help to those preparing entries for the CID Video Competition in 2020.

This year’s competition has the theme “listening is how intercultural dialogue starts.” This means students need to demonstrate their understanding of 2 concepts. The first is Listening. Materials published on the CID site that should be useful include:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#37: Dialogic listening

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues
#6: The privilege of listening first

As well as several posts related to listening:
LIST(e)N and The Day of Listening
Call for Papers: International Listening Association
Call for Papers: Special issue of International Journal of Listening on Listening in mediated contexts

The second part is Intercultural Dialogue. CID has produced a number of overlapping explanations, including:

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue
#1:    Intercultural dialogue
#8:   Public dialogue
#10: Cross-cultural dialogue
#14: Dialogue
#81: Dialogue as a space of relationship
#84: Double intercultural dialogue

Constructing Intercultural Dialogues
#9: Intercultural dialogue as an activity of daily living
#11: Creating connection through intercultural dialogue partners

CID Posters
#3: Intercultural dialogue
#6: Dialogue defined
#8: Intercultural competence/intercultural dialogue

If you have further questions, see previously published competition rules, and FAQ. See the reflection by one winning team on creating their video. Or send an email with a question. When you’re ready to submit an entry, click here [URL to be added when the competition opens].

CID Video Competition 2020: Listening is How Intercultural Dialogue Starts

Job adsThe Center for Intercultural Dialogue announces its third annual video competition, open to students enrolled in any college or university during spring 2020. Deadline: June 1, 2020, at midnight (east coast US time).

CID Video Competition 2020

 

This year’s competition asks students to focus on listening, as listening is how intercultural dialogue starts.

Listening gives shape to speaking, inviting other people into a dialogue…Our acts of listening, like all communication, are shaped by our cultural and individual differences. – Elizabeth S. Parks

Listening is what happens when people stop focusing on what they say or do, and start attending to what someone else is saying or doing. Without listening, there can be no intercultural dialogue.

Intercultural dialogue is the art and science of understanding the Other. – Peter Praxmarer

Intercultural dialogue can include international, interracial, interethnic, and interfaith interactions, but it is always active (people doing something) rather than passive (people thinking about something).

Faculty members are invited to discuss intercultural dialogue in a class, perhaps showing winning entries from 2018 or 2019, and to suggest that students produce very short videos as their response. Students are encouraged to be creative, show off their knowledge and skills, and have fun with the topic.

The top award winner will receive a $200 prize. And the top three winners will receive a copy of Elizabeth Parks’ 2019 book, The Ethics of Listening: Creating Space for Sustainable Dialogue, courtesy of the publisher, Lexington Books.

All award-winning entries will be posted to the CID YouTube channel, and highlighted on the CID website, LinkedIn group, Facebook group, and Twitter feed, through posts describing the creators and highlighting each of their videos. Perhaps most important to student learning, all entries will be sent comments from the judges. Past winning entries have come from Italy, the UK, Peru, Spain, Denmark, Hong Kong, and the USA.

In addition to the rules below, a list of Resources and FAQ have been posted, as well asReflection by winning students, which provides peer-to-peer advice. Contact Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, CID Director, with any questions.

Competition Rules:

  1. Entries must be between 30 seconds to 2 minutes in length. Longer videos will be disqualified.

  2. Entries may be submitted May 1-June 1, 2020. (URL will be added here on May 1.) CID is not responsible for any entry that is misdirected, corrupted, or not received by this date. Judging will occur in June, and winners will be announced in July.

  3. Submissions will be evaluated based on: originality, clarity, showing how listening permits intercultural dialogue, effective use of technology, and overall impact.

  4. All part-time or full time undergraduate or graduate students (post-graduates for those outside the USA) currently enrolled at any university or college or community/ technical college/school, anywhere in the world, are eligible. If high school students wish to join in, they are welcome as well. Students can work independently or in groups. Given the topic, incorporating more than one viewpoint may be particularly appropriate. Ensuring that at least someone in the group knows something about the idea of intercultural dialogue, and at least someone has created a video before, should be useful.

  5. Videos should be created by students, not edited and corrected ahead of time by their instructors. Students must submit videos themselves.

  6. In addition to a video, each entry must be accompanied by a completed brief information form about the creator(s). This will be used as a resource in contacting winners, and then in sharing information about them on the CID website and other social media at the end of the competition.

  7. By submitting your entry, you are attesting that you have the necessary authorization to use the images, audio, text, music, and any other content contained in your video. Please do not enter if you are in violation of, or uncertain of your rights to, any copyrights, patents, trademarks, video, music or other intellectual property. Consult your faculty advisor if you have any questions or doubts about the content of your entry. Online resources include the Documentary Filmmakers Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use and the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video; these and other such best-practices codes are available from the Center for Media and Social Impact.

  8. Submissions found incomprehensible, inappropriate, or in violation of intellectual property rights for any reason in the sole judgment of CID will not be accepted into the competition.

  9. Funding for the first prize cash award is provided by the Broadcast Education Association (BEA), one of the members of CID’s parent organization, the Council of Communication Associations.

Listening across cultures

The 2013 International Listening Association Convention occurs 20-23 June, 2013 in beautiful Montréal. The convention theme, Listening: The Art, The Science, The Joie de Vivre, is intended to highlight the synergistic relationship between listening research and practice as well as the importance of effective listening to daily life.

Panel on Listening across Cultures – Request for participants – deadline Feb 1st.

When we communicate with people who participate in different ethnic, racial or culture groups, we engage in a negotiation of traits, qualities, descriptions and attributes.

This panel is inspired by and responds to the essay of Krista Ratcliffe entitled “Rhetorical Listening: A Trope for Interpretive Invention and a ‘Code of Cross-Cultural Conduct'” This panel explores the intersections of listening theory and cross-cultural pedagogy, and seeks to expand listening theory as complicated by cultural categories including gender, racial, ethnic and other cultural constructions.

A goal of this panel is to move beyond binary oppositions between ethnic, racial and gendered spaces. In this way it is hoped that cross-cultural dialogues in the classroom and beyond might be facilitated. We postulate that it is fruitful to identify our varied simultaneous differences and commonalities, and identify metonymic echoes of larger cultural discourses we carry on as educators.  We seek to encourage focus simultaneously on communication commonalities and differences among ourselves. We seek to articulate intersections between cultures and genders to promote cross-cultural communication. Aspects of cross-cultural communication can be seen as a trope that describes how we use language and how language uses us.

This panel builds on understanding through listening by moving beyond simple categorizing of cultural identity. While we continue to divide people by appearance, language habits and cultural attributes, we can be informed by contemporary scholarship which suggests that race, gender and ethnicity are social constructions that are created and reconstructed continuously. Another challenge to cross-cultural listening is that many people belong to more than one defined group.

This panel will highlight how cultural grouping are negotiated each time people communicate. The listening aspect of conversations helps by short-circuiting stereotype fulfillment and avoids imposing expectations on people.

Seeking panel participants. Panel submissions might include but are not limited to:
* Listening across borders
* Listening between LGTBQ individuals and others
* Listening across gender
* Listening when race or ethnicity is involved

Potential contributors should send an abstract with a proposed topic for the panel to Steven Gibson at: steven.gibson.737 AT my.csun.edu