South Asian Film Festival (Montreal)

An eclectic mix of award-winning films from the Indian subcontinent and its diaspora
Kabir Centre for Arts & Culture
The South Asian Film Festival of Montréal, 6th edition
Friday, November 4 – Sunday, November 6
Click HERE for all film descriptions and trailers

Kabir Centre for Arts & Culture is pleased to announce the 6th edition of the South Asian Film Festival of Montréal (SAFFMontréal), organized in collaboration with the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema of Concordia University, on November 4, 5 and 6. This innovative festival presents an eclectic choice of inspiring and thought-provoking films made in the countries of the Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and Maldives) and its diaspora. These engaging and entertaining films have their focus on South Asia; while at the same time compel audiences to realize how much there is in common among cultures throughout the world, identifying both shared life-struggles and joys. Admission is free, with donations gratefully appreciated. Discussions are held after each screening.

The South Asian Film Festival will be presenting 17 films this year; short and long, documentaries and feature films, including comedy, drama and music. All films are subtitled in English and explained in French, with various original languages such as Urdu, Hindi, Tamil, Marathi, Malayalam, Bengali and English, as well as silent films, making them accessible to as many people as possible. The films have been carefully chosen from more than 1000 entries and all screenings will be followed by a talkback between spectators and a panel of experts. Directors for some of the films will be present, other times the directors will interact with the audience via Skype. Most of the films are recent and have won awards at international festivals. As in previous years, the films are drawn from different parts of the Indian subcontinent; recognized as the largest producers of films on the planet.

Refugee Hotel (Montreal)

Refugee HotelThe Refugee Hotel
Written by Carmen Aguirre, Directed by Paulina Abarca-Cantin
A dark comedy about exile, love and the Canadian resettlement experience

Oct. 26-Nov. 13, 2016
Teesri Duniya Theatre at Segal Centre Studio
5170 Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, Canada

The world’s refugee crisis looms large, affecting all walks of lives, generations and nations. This moving, dark comedy brings to life the consequences of exile, betrayal, torture and guilt, but it is ultimately about the strength of the human spirit and its power to heal. Here, Aguirre poignantly chronicles the story of a wave of Chilean refugees placed at a hotel in downtown Montreal following the aftermath of the brutal Chilean coup d’état of Sept. 11, 1973. The Refugee Hotel resonates with contemporary relevance and universality, exploring Canada’s ability to successfully accept, support and embrace refugees as new citizens.

The play is performed in English with Spanish surtitles. Continuing their mandate to encourage dialogue, the company will hold a talkback with invited guests after each performance.

Cette comédie sombre et touchante donne vie aux conséquences de l’exil, de la trahison, de la torture et de la culpabilité, mais est avant tout à propos de la force de l’esprit humain et de son pouvoir de guérison. Raconté par une jeune femme qui revit son enfance en pensées, Aguirre retrace de manière poignante l’histoire d’une vague de réfugiés chiliens qui sont placés dans un hôtel du centre-ville de Montréal, suite aux conséquences du coup d’état brutal au Chili le 11 septembre 1973. The Refugee Hotel résonne avec une pertinence contemporaine et universalité, explorant la capacité du Canada à accepter, supporter et adopter avec succès les réfugiés en tant que citoyens.

With/Avec: Charles Bender, Pablo Diconca, Braulio Elicer, Craig Francis, Ziad Ghanem, Shanti Gonzales, Juan Grey, Gilda Monreal, Sally Singal, Mariana Tayler and Vera Wilson Valdez

Segal Centre box office Halloween Special- Remember the souls from the refugee hotel: tickets for Sun. Oct. 30 8pm & Mon. Oct. 31 are 2-for-1 if purchased by Oct. 20 with the code word ‘refugee’.

IAMCR: Hegemony or Resistance? The Ambiguous Power of Communication (Montreal)

IAMCR: Hegemony or Resistance? The Ambiguous Power of Communication
July 12-16, 2015, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Canada

This year’s International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR) conference theme seeks to explore the ambiguous relationship of communication towards hegemony and resistance. It relates, for example, to the various ways in which communication has been described not only as a value of our times – echoing an ideal for social transparency and communality – but also as a threat in terms of global domination. This ambiguity has prompted debates in academia about communication being at the same time a value and a tool, a space of consent and one of struggle, and having (more authentic) local and global dimensions.

For example, recent demonstrations around the world, such as Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring, the chilean students’ protest, or the Los Indignados movement, as well as the Québec student’s strike and Idle no more in Canada, have triggered discussions and reflections about the utopia of communication. Massively supported by digital media and organised around the ideal of building more authentic forms of community, these mass movements of “global solidarity” have mobilized communication as a value that challenges authorities, financial or economic globalisation and dominant representations of the world-as-we-know-it. These movements draw on the argument that global corporate media and cultural industries have distanced us from more faithful forms of communication. In this sense, they echo what John Durham Peters has described as our obsession for communication as a “registry of modern longings,” whether based on democracy, social and economic justice, or “the mutual communion of souls.” While embracing these arguments, protest movements have a paradoxical relationship to communication, resisting its role in the domination of global cultural industries and capitalism while at the same time applauding its capacity to foster values and communality that would otherwise have been lost. They often do so through disruptive communication practices using communication technologies or cultural productions.

While multiple sites of resistance are spreading around the world, much of the debates about communication technologies mark an increasing suspicion towards the new media’s capability for empowerment. The crisis unveiled by the Edward Snowden case, the importance of Big data and the NSA’s large-scale espionage practices, just to name a few examples, reveal part of the ambiguous relationship that the public maintains with the media. Despite a general consensus over the past few years, which is critical of the use of communication technologies for surveillance and ideological purposes, few people have really changed their own use of communication devices. Political reform promises, as well as the social, economic and cultural prominence of new technologies seem to contribute to the maintenance of a negotiated status quo. Such situations are far from exceptional and examples abound of what Antonio Gramsci referred to as hegemonic domination by consent, where communication not only represents an instrument for control, but also a space for the expression of the majority – “organs of public opinions […] that are artificially multiplied” – that legitimate these practices.

Beyond these examples, this year’s conference theme concentrates on this ambiguous power of communication. What are the finalities of communication with regards to opposing forces acting at micro, meso and macro levels? To what extent can media and communication “change our living world”? How can communication contribute to the empowerment of individuals and groups in their local contexts? How do modern forms of communication interact with the ideal of democracy, considered as much an apparatus for manipulation as for freedom? If communication has power, what is the nature of this power? How do media represent hegemonic processes and acts of resistance? In what ways do entertainment, social media, journalism or public relations act as symbols of resistance or control for corporations and civil society? In what ways does media and communication research constitute in itself a site of hegemonic domination or of resistance? Contributions may include empirical research from a wide variety of terrains, or methodological and theoretical papers from a large scope of epistemological perspectives.

– Registration fees depend on your country of residence, when you register (earlybird, regular or late), and whether you are a member of IAMCR. Consult the registration fees.

– IAMCR members enjoy significantly discounted fees.

– All students -regardless of IAMCR membership status – can register with reduced fees. If you register as a student, you  will be required to show proof of your student status (a student card or a letter from your university) at the registration desk in Montreal.

Re-Create: Histories of Media Art, Science & Technology 2015 (Montreal)

RE-CREATE 2015
The 10th anniversary and sixth international conference on the histories of Media Art, Science and Technology

Reminder DEADLINE extended January 12, 2015

Hexagram, Concordia University and Université du Québec à Montréal in collaboration with Media@McGill and CIRMMT- McGill Montréal, Canada.
5-8 November 2015
Re-Create CFP Submission

Re-Create 2015, the sixth international Conference on the Histories of Media Art, Science and Technology will mark the 10th Anniversary of the Re conference series. Re-Create 2015 is devoted to exploring what theories, methodologies and techniques can be used to understand past, present and indeed, future paradigms of creative material practice involving technologies within research contexts from a historical and critical point of view.

The title Re-Create is an abbreviation for the term “research-creation”, part of a growing international movement which goes by many names: “practice-led research,” “research-led practice,” and “artistic-research,” among others.

While the link between research and practice seems to be a new horizon, the media-based arts have long been at the intersection of the humanities, sciences, and engineering and present a critical site in which to take up the changing relationships between knowledge, power, and economy.

Research normally signifies modes of acquiring new knowledge that coherently and systematically advance a field and is grounded and validated by both social frameworks (peers) and existing bodies of knowledge. Similarly, research in conjunction with material practice demands that making be historically, theoretically and methodologically framed and valorized.

Re-Create 2015 seeks to interrogate the historical entanglement of research and making within a wide and diverse set of international sites, disciplines and contexts: from non-institutional creative research initiatives driven by artists and designers in the streets, to the labyrinths of industry funded research labs and universities. From unknown or ignored histories of research-based practices in Latin America, Asia and Indigenous communities to government funded initiatives, the conference will thus critically explore the ongoing and productive tensions between theory, method and making in the histories of media art, science and technology.

Potential contributors to the conference should focus thematic panel sessions or individual papers on one of the following areas of concentration:
:: LAB STUDIES: Studies on how artists and designers have historically worked in industry, universities and collective, grass roots-based research environments
:: CURATORIAL ACTIONS AND PRACTICES: How have research paradigms historically entered into curatorial practices and how have they been framed, exhibited and articulated?
:: ANTI-INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH: Historical profiles of non-institutionally based research-driven explorations.
:: THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS: How have theoretical paradigms in media, art, science and technology historically evolved structuralism in the 1960s or media studies to current work in affect theory, media archaeology, critical post-humanist approaches derived from STS, appropriation and
remix aesthetics, feminist new materialism, queer and postcolonial studies, enactive and distributed cognition?
:: METHODOLOGIES: What can methodological tools emerging from the human and social sciences like ethnography, historiography, archaeology, genealogy and other qualitative techniques provide to the historical and critical positioning of practice?
:: INTERDISCIPLINARY INTERSECTIONS AND IMPACTS: Exploration of the formation and rise of interdisciplinary research fields (image science, sound studies, science studies, sensory studies, environmental studies) and their impact on the construction of media art histories.
:: DIGITAL HUMANITIES: What is the historical relationship between the digital humanities and the histories of media art, science and technology?
:: SITES: How historically have sites of research and practice in media art, science and technology evolved outside of the predominant spheres of Europe and North America and what forms have they taken?

CONFERENCE PROGRAM
The conference program will include competitively selected peer-reviewed individual papers, panel presentations and poster sessions as well as a number of keynotes and invited speakers and a parallel satellite program of events with Hexagram partners including core cultural institutions in Montreal. In the interest of maintaining a concentrated conference program, there will be a series of plenary sessions as well as accompanying poster sessions. Each of the plenaries as well as the poster sessions will mix together scholars and practitioners representing different cultural perspectives. The conference will be held in English and French, with live translation.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
Re-Create 2015 welcomes contributions from researchers, artists, designers, scholars and technologists working across diverse disciplines, sites and practices. We particularly encourage scholars and creators from international contexts outside of Europe and North America.

ABOUT THE CONTEXT AND THE HOST
The conference will take place in Montreal hosted by Hexagram, the international network for media, art, design and digital culture. It is the largest network of its kind in Canada and one of the largest internationally dedicated to research-led creative practices. Ten years after the inaugural Re-Fresh conference at the Banff New Media Institute in 2005, the return of the conference to Canada and specifically to Quebec, offers a pertinent context to address the evolution of research in the histories of media, art, science and technology. The conference will be held across the two core Hexagram sites at Concordia University and the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). The venues are within walking distance from each other, centrally located in vibrant, downtown Montreal – the digital arts and culture capital of North America.

SUBMISSIONS
250 word abstracts of proposals, panel presentations and posters should be submitted in either Text, RTF, Word or PDF formats. Texts can be submitted in French and in English. The DEADLINE for submissions is January 12, 2015. INFORMATION about the submission process and general information can be found at: Re-Create Submission Site.

Conference partners include Media@McGill, CIRMMT-McGill, Cinémathèque québécoise, DHC-Art, Elektra/ACREQ, Goethe-Institut Montreal, Department fpr Image Science Danube University and others to be announced.

Conference chairs and Hexagram Co-Directors: Chris Salter, artist, Concordia University Research Chair and Associate Professor, Design and Computation Arts, Concordia University (QC/CA/US/DE) and Gisèle Trudel (QC/CA), artist and professor, École des arts visuels et médiatiques, Université du Québec à Montréal.

Re-Create Local Organizing Committee: Thierry BARDINI, Barbara CLAUSEN, Ricardo DAL FARRA, Jean DUBOIS, Jean GAGNON, Alice JIM, Jason LEWIS, Jonathan LESSARD, Louise POISSANT, Chris SALTER, Cheryl SIM, Jonathan STERNE, Alain THIBAULT, Gisele TRUDEL, Marcelo WANDERLEY

Re-Create 2015 International Advisory Board: Marie-Luise ANGERER, Monika BAKKE, Samuel BIANCHINI, Georgina BORN, Andreas BROECKMANN, Annick BUREAUD, Michael CENTURY, Joel CHADABE, Dooeun CHOI, Ian CLOTHIER, Sarah COOK, Nina CZEGLEDY, Sara DIAMOND, Diane DOMINGUES, Jean Paul FOURMENTRAUX, Zhang GA, Sébastien GENVO, Orit HALPERN, Jens HAUSER, Denisa KERA, Felipe César LONDONO, Natalie LOVELESS, Glenn LOWRY, Rafael LOZANO-HEMMER, Roger MALINA, Sally Jane NORMAN, Nicolas NOVA, Jussi PARIKKA, Christiane PAUL, Simon PENNY, Andrew PICKERING, Sundar SARRUKAI, Yukiko SHIKATA, Michel VAN DARTEL, Ionat ZURR

MAH Honorary Board: Douglas DAVIS, Jasia REICHARDT, Itsuo SAKANE, Peter WEIBEL

MAH Conference Series Board: Sean CUBITT, Oliver GRAU, Linda HENDERSON, Erkki HUHTAMO, Douglas KAHN, Martin KEMP, Machiko KUSAHARA, Tim LENOIR, Gunalan NADARAJAN, Paul THOMAS

Listening across cultures

The 2013 International Listening Association Convention occurs 20-23 June, 2013 in beautiful Montréal. The convention theme, Listening: The Art, The Science, The Joie de Vivre, is intended to highlight the synergistic relationship between listening research and practice as well as the importance of effective listening to daily life.

Panel on Listening across Cultures – Request for participants – deadline Feb 1st.

When we communicate with people who participate in different ethnic, racial or culture groups, we engage in a negotiation of traits, qualities, descriptions and attributes.

This panel is inspired by and responds to the essay of Krista Ratcliffe entitled “Rhetorical Listening: A Trope for Interpretive Invention and a ‘Code of Cross-Cultural Conduct'” This panel explores the intersections of listening theory and cross-cultural pedagogy, and seeks to expand listening theory as complicated by cultural categories including gender, racial, ethnic and other cultural constructions.

A goal of this panel is to move beyond binary oppositions between ethnic, racial and gendered spaces. In this way it is hoped that cross-cultural dialogues in the classroom and beyond might be facilitated. We postulate that it is fruitful to identify our varied simultaneous differences and commonalities, and identify metonymic echoes of larger cultural discourses we carry on as educators.  We seek to encourage focus simultaneously on communication commonalities and differences among ourselves. We seek to articulate intersections between cultures and genders to promote cross-cultural communication. Aspects of cross-cultural communication can be seen as a trope that describes how we use language and how language uses us.

This panel builds on understanding through listening by moving beyond simple categorizing of cultural identity. While we continue to divide people by appearance, language habits and cultural attributes, we can be informed by contemporary scholarship which suggests that race, gender and ethnicity are social constructions that are created and reconstructed continuously. Another challenge to cross-cultural listening is that many people belong to more than one defined group.

This panel will highlight how cultural grouping are negotiated each time people communicate. The listening aspect of conversations helps by short-circuiting stereotype fulfillment and avoids imposing expectations on people.

Seeking panel participants. Panel submissions might include but are not limited to:
* Listening across borders
* Listening between LGTBQ individuals and others
* Listening across gender
* Listening when race or ethnicity is involved

Potential contributors should send an abstract with a proposed topic for the panel to Steven Gibson at: steven.gibson.737 AT my.csun.edu

Cole Foundation grants

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Grant applications for the Cole Foundation’s upcoming round of Intercultural Conversations-Conversations Interculturelles programs are now available online. Recent grants totalling $148,140 were handed out to professional theatre companies in Montreal for their 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 seasons. The Cole Foundation created this grant program to encourage a better understanding and greater social harmony amongst the various cultural communities of Montreal through the presentation of professional French and English language theatre. Barry Cole, Cole Foundation President, believes that dialogue leads to better understanding, appreciation and greater social harmony amongst the cultural communities. With this in mind, the Cole Foundation initiated the programme Intercultural Conversations to stimulate the production of theatrical events that feature intercultural dialogue and that introduce Montrealers to other cultural heritages and social realities. Intercultural Conversations consists of production grants, commissioning grants and translation grants to both French and English theatre companies.

Montreal is a multicultural city welcoming people of all ethnic origins. The Cole Foundation wants Montrealers to have a greater awareness of the voices and stories from and about its diverse cultures and communities. Dialogue among these various cultural communities is one way of bringing them together. Theatre has the ability of fostering this intercultural dialogue through the presentation of stories of other cultures on stage and the Cole Foundation considers it vital to support plays that explore these important issues.

Grants for the next competition relate to the 2012-13 and 2013-14 theatre seasons. The deadline for the fourth competition of this meaningful award is October 7. Application forms are now available online where you will also find further information, including lists of past recipients.
Intercultural Conversations grant application forms are available for download here: www.colefoundation.ca/community/competition-forms

Information about the Intercultural Conversations program: www.colefoundation.ca/community
Information about the Cole Foundation Pediatric Oncology research grants: http://www.colefoundation.ca

International Association for Dialogue Analysis report

The 13th conference of the International Association for Dialogue Analysis (IADA), which took place in Montreal, Canada, from April 26-30, 2011,  was a big success with some 26 countries represented and close to 110 participants from around the world. The theme of the conference was “Dialogue and Representation,” which allowed participants to address what dialogue studies have to say about the question of representation, whether we speak in terms of political, artistic, cognitive or methodological forms of representation. Six keynote speakers were invited to participate in this event: in alphabetic order, Éric Grillo (Sorbonne Nouvelle, France), Cornelia Ilie (U. of Malmö, Sweden), Alain Létourneau (U de Sherbrooke, Canada), Wolfgang Teubert (U of Birmingham, UK), Karen Tracy (U of Colorado, Boulder, USA), and Edda Weigand (U. of Münster, Germany). A volume, published in the series Dialogue Studies at John Benjamins, will be soon edited by François Cooren and Alain Létourneau. This book will include some of the best contributions to this international conference. A special issue of the new journal Language and Dialogue will also include some key contributions to this event. The proceedings will also be soon available on the IADA website.

François Cooren
IADA secretary and co-organizer of the conference