KC92 Kintsugi Translated into Japanese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#92: Kintsugi, which Akari Takenishi wrote for publication in English in 2018, and which she has now translated into Japanese.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC92 Kintsugi-JapaneseTakenishi, A. (2018). Kintsugi [Japanese]. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 92. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/11/kc92-kintsugi_japanese.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC92 Kintsugi

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC#92: Kintsugi, by Akari Takenishi. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC92 KintsugiTakenishi, A. (2018). Kintsugi. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 92. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/kc92-kintsugi.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Key Concept #22: Cultural Identity Translated into Japanese

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#22: Cultural identity, which Vivian Hsueh-Hua Chen wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Akari Takenishi has now translated into Japanese.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC22 Cultural Identity_JapaneseChen, V. H.-H. (2017). Cultural identity [Japanese]. (A. Takenishi, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 22. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/kc22-cultural-identity_japanese.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Akari Takenishi Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAkari Takenishi has recently completed a Master’s degree in International and Intercultural Communication at Royal Roads University in Canada.

Akari Takanishi photoShe earned her Bachelor’s degree in Geography, focusing on the cultural and social aspects of Geography at the University of Victoria. She is interested in studying multiculturalism in Canada. Examining her personal experiences as an international student from Japan, she wrote about the influences of multiculturalism on self-representation of identity in society. While completing her Master’s, she also served as research assistant for a study examining the impacts of social media on higher education.

Akari has served as an interpreter and translator, believing that the power of knowledge is limitless and translation is one of the most influential ways to make knowledge reach a greater audience. She has translated several TED talks into Japanese, including:

  • “You don’t need an app for that” By Toby Shapshak
  • “Don’t insist on English” By Patricia Ryan
  • “How to air-condition outdoor spaces” By Wolfgang Kessling
  • “Learning from Sherman the shark” by Jim Toomey
  • “The economic injustice of plastic” by Van Jones

Having grown up in a small village in Japan, she appreciates nature and enjoys growing plants. She became involved in her family tea farm as a distributor dealing with a local tea shop in Canada. Her life has brought her unexpected opportunities and excitement and she feels fortunate to be surrounded by friends, family and mentors who support her personal life as well as academic pursuits. Her academic interests include:

  • Designing a platform where small farmers around the world can share their knowledge and experience with sustainable farming methods, resource management, and reliable market building.
  • Investigating the role of eco-politics in international relations and how it challenges international relations theory in global environmental conflicts.
  • Investigating the academic language proficiency of international graduate students studying in North America and the accuracy of scores of English proficiency tests in portraying academic language skills.

Akari is currently increasing her translation skills, focusing on articles and journals related to intercultural communication and competence. She would like to connect with any individuals or groups who share similar academic interests to discuss future projects and opportunities. As a recent graduate, she is excited to share her knowledge and skills, and learn more from others, hoping that she can be a part of a positive change for a socially and environmentally sustainable future.