Barbara Hines Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesBarbara B. Hines (Ph.D. University of Maryland, M.A. American University, B.S. The University of Texas at Austin) is professor of journalism and director of the Graduate Program in Mass Communication and Media Studies, Howard University, Washington, DC.

Her research includes the history and development of scholastic and collegiate journalism, accreditation in higher education, public relations and journalism, with numerous publications in these and related areas.  She has served as president of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and through foundation and U.S. State Department-funded programs has helped to train journalists from Europe, Asia and Africa.

PhD scholarships – Leeds

The Institute of Communications Studies at the University of Leeds is offering a number of PhD Scholarships for study commencing in September/October 2011. The scholarships cover full maintenance and fees equivalent to the Home/EU rate, for a period of three years. They are intended to support full-time study leading to a PhD in any area of the Institute’s research activities, and are open to both home/EU and international applicants.

Deadline for receipt of applications is 1 May 2011.

See details or make other enquiries to ics-phd-admin@leeds.ac.uk

Empedocles call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Interpersonal Communication and Social Interaction” Special Issue of Empedocles, guest edited by Pekka Isotalus (University of Tampere) and Owen Hargie (University of Ulster).

There is growing need for a European publication platform for interpersonal communication and social interaction research and theory development. In order to give the European communication research community an opportunity to assess the scope of such a platform, Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication will publish a special guest-edited issue on interpersonal communication and social interaction, which could also be the starting point for a new journal dedicated to this area of research: European Journal of Human Communication.

As guest editors for a special edition of Empedocles to be published in December 2011, we welcome proposals for articles that explore contacts and bonds between people, whether in private or public contexts, whether maintained face-to-face or mediated via communication technologies. The articles can focus on interpersonal relationships; group and team communication; conversational organisation; verbal and nonverbal communication; language and social interaction; intercultural dimensions; public speaking; radio and television performance; rhetoric; argumentation; persuasion and mutual influence; communicative competence and interpersonal skills; ethnography of speaking; and, other related approaches to human social interaction. We encourage qualitative approaches to research, while also encompassing quantitative inquiry. For this special issue, theoretical, evaluative or interpretative studies are especially welcome.

The journal publishes double-blind peer reviewed articles (6,000-8,000 words). Submissions should be sent by email before June 15, 2011, to guest editors Pekka Isotalus (pekka.isotalus@uta.fi) and Owen Hargie (ODW.Hargie@ulster.ac.uk).

Empedocles uses the MHRA referencing system. Please download the notes for contributors for further information.

Maria Flora Mangano Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesMaria Flora ManganoItalian scholar of intercultural and interdisciplinary dialogue, with a background in natural (Ph.D. in Biochemistry) and in social sciences (Ph.D. in Humanistic Intercultural Studies).

Maria Flora ManganoSince 2007, she has been lecturing on Communication of Scientific Research to young scientists drawn from different fields of study within the natural, social and human sciences of some Italian faculties. Since 2008, she has been invited professor of Dialogue among Cultures in an Italian philosophical and theological faculty (“St. Peter’s Philosophical-Theological Institute” of Viterbo). She is interested in dialogue as a space of relationship between, across and beyond cultures and disciplines. Her approach to research and teaching is transcultural and transdisciplinary, and, in this perspective, the space of relationship is mediated by the philosophy of dialogue.

She participated in the National Communication Association Summer Conference on Intercultural Dialogue ’09 and, since then, she had shared this approach in several contributions related to the Center for Intercultural Dialogue network. They include:

• a chapter in a volume edited by the CID scholars: Mangano, M.F. (2015). Dialogue, as a common ground between, across and beyond cultures and disciplines – A case study of transcultural and transdisciplinary communication lectures for graduate and undergraduate Students. In N. Haydari & P. Holmes (Eds.), Intercultural case studies (pp. 73-86). Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.

• two guest posts for the CID website: in 2013 (Example of dialogue among cultures) and in 2014 (A space of relationship among dialogues and cultures),

• Case Study #2: Reconciliation for the series Constructing Intercultural Dialogues in 2017, and

• translations of multiple Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue into Italian.

Donal Carbaugh Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesDonal Carbaugh is Professor of Communication at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

He is recipient of the University’s highest awards for Outstanding Accomplishments in Research and Creative Activity in addition to the Samuel F. Conti Faculty Research Fellowship; he is also the recipient of teaching awards as a Graduate Mentor, a Hewlett Fellow, and as a finalist for the university’s campus-wide Distinguished Teaching Award. In June of 2017, a conference on New Directions in the Ethnography of Communication was held in his honor at Mount Saint Vincent College, New York City. In 2016, he was named a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association (NCA) for a lifetime of achievement. In 2007-2008, he was appointed Fulbright’s Distinguished Professor and Bicentennial Chair of North American Studies at the University of Helsinki Finland.

Carbaugh’s general interests focus upon cultural philosophies of communication, the environment, and the ways culturally distinctive practices get woven into international and intercultural interactions. His studies focus upon Native American, popular American, Russian, and Finnish communication practices, with special attention to the relationship between language use, culture, spirit, and nature. In 1992, he was elected Visiting Senior Member at Linacre College, Oxford University, England, which is a lifetime position. He has held academic appointments at the Universities of Colorado, Montana, Pittsburgh, the University of Helsinki, the University of Tampere, the Turku School of Economics in Finland, and at other universities. He currently serves on about twenty editorial boards of national and international journals. His published research has appeared in many major academic journals, in several countries including Finland, Germany, Italy, and Russia, in several languages.

His recent books include: Reporting cultures on 60 Minutes (with Michael Berry), and, The Handbook of Communication in Cross-cultural Perspective (edited). His authored book, Cultures in Conversation, was awarded the “Old Chestnut” in Language and Social Interaction and Outstanding Book of the Year in International and Intercultural Communication from that division of the National Communication Association. His edited volume, Cultural Communication and Intercultural Contact, received the National Communication Association’s Award for Distinguished Scholarship in International and Intercultural Communication. His other books include Distinctive Qualities in Communication Research (with Patrice Buzzanell), Narrative and Identity: Studies in Autobiography, Self and Culture (edited with Jens Brockmeier), and Situating Selves: The Communication of Social Identity in American Scenes. His favored perspective on communication is an entry in several international encyclopedia and has been featured in the Journal of Multicultural Discourses, in Language and Intercultural Communication, by the National Academies in 2010, and as a key perspective for community work by the British Dialogue Society. Commentary on his work has appeared in The New York TimesThe Washington PostIndian Country TodayPsychology Today(several times and includes a January 2007 article about Finnishness), Vapaa Sana (North America’s largest Finnish newspaper), theFinnish American Reporter, the Moscow TimesThe Times of India, and Gentleman’s Quarterly among other outlets.

Call for papers -AJHA

CALL FOR PAPERS
American Journalism Historians Association

The American Journalism Historians Association invites paper entries, panel proposals and abstracts of research in progress on any facet of media history for its 30th annual convention to be held October 6-8, 2011, in Kansas City, Mo. The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2011.

The AJHA views journalism history broadly, embracing print, broadcasting, advertising, public relations and other forms of mass communication which have been inextricably intertwined with the human past. Because the AJHA requires presentation of original material, research papers and panels submitted to the convention should not have been submitted to or accepted by another convention or publication.

Research Papers
Authors may submit only one research paper. Research entries must be no longer than 25 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, not including notes. The Chicago Manual of Style is recommended but not required.

The AJHA paper competition is administered electronically. Papers must be submitted in PDF, saved with author identification only in the file names and not in the papers. Each paper must be submitted as an attachment, with a 150-word abstract and contact information included in the text of the e-mail to: ajhapapers@gmail.com.

Authors of accepted papers must register for the convention and attend in order to present their research. Authors should bring 25 copies of their papers to distribute at the convention. Research awards include: the Robert Lance Award for outstanding student research paper, the J. William Snorgrass Award for outstanding minority-journalism research paper, the Maurine Beasley Award for outstanding women’s-history research paper, a new award for outstanding research in media and war, and the David Sloan award for the outstanding faculty research paper.

For information queries only, contact Research Chair Janice Hume, University of Georgia, at jhume@uga.edu.

Panels
To propose a panel, please submit:

  • A brief description of the topic.
  • The names of the moderator and participants (no more than two of whom may be from the same institution).
  • A brief summary of each participant’s presentation.
  • Entries must be no longer than 3 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with 1-inch margins. No individual may participate in more than one panel. Panel organizers should make sure panelists have not agreed to serve on multiple panels. Failure to adhere to the guidelines will lead to rejection of the proposal. Preference will be given to those proposals that involve the audience and panelists in meaningful discussion or debate. Panel participants must register for and attend the convention.

    Linda Lumsden, University of Arizona, is coordinating the 2011 panel competition. Submit proposals attached in PDF format with contact information included to: ajhapanels@gmail.com

    Research in Progress
    For research in progress submissions, send:

  • A blind abstract of your study with identifying information only in the file name but not in the abstract. Include the proposal title in the abstract. The abstract should include a clear purpose statement as well as a brief description of your primary sources.
  • Abstracts must be no longer than 2 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, with 1-inch margins, not including notes. Primary sources should be described in an additional 1-page, double-spaced, page. The AJHA Research in Progress competition is administered electronically. Proposals must be submitted in PDF, saved with author identification only in the file names and not in the text of the proposal. Each proposal must be submitted as an attachment, with your name, project title and contact information included in the text of the e-mail to: ajharip@gmail.com. If your proposal is accepted, you’ll be asked to bring to the conference 20 copies of a four- to five-page summary of your research. Authors of accepted research in progress must register for and attend the convention. Kim Mangun, University of Utah, is coordinating the 2011 Research in Progress competition.

    Janice Hume Researcher Profile

    Researcher ProfilesJanice Hume (Ph.D., 1997, M.A., 1995, B.J., 1981, University of Missouri School of Journalism) is an associate professor of journalism in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Georgia.

    Her research focuses on journalism history, particularly how it relates to collective memory and the social construction of death. She has written two books, Obituaries in American Culture (University Press of Mississippi, 2000) and Journalism in a Culture of Grief (with Carolyn Kitch, Routledge, 2007), as well as numerous journal articles published in Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Journalism & Communication Monographs, Journalism History, American Journalism, Journal of Popular Culture, the Review of Communication and Omega: Journal of Death and Dying. She is Research Chair of the American Journalism Historians Association and formerly served as head of the History Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    Post-Doc International Studies

    POST DOC OPPORTUNITY
    North Carolina State University has a post-doc position in international studies open for 2011-2012.  Applications are being reviewed as they are received, so respond quickly if interested.

    The successful candidate will be someone whose areas of expertise align with one or more of the graduate programs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at NC State (see their list of master’s and doctoral programs).

    As Director of the interdisciplinary doctoral program in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media, Professor Steve Wiley would be happy to respond to inquiries from potential applicants with  expertise in international studies and digital media, including candidates with a background in rhetoric, communication research, media studies, and/or critical/cultural studies.

    For more information about the CRDM PhD program, please visit their website and student blog.

    Calouste Gulbenkian Prize

    PRIZE NOMINATIONS
    The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation has once again opened nominations for the Calouste Gulbenkian International Prize until next March 15th. This year the Prize will be awarded to individuals or non profit organizations that have made a valuable impact and commitment towards inter-cultural, inter-ethnic and inter-religious dialogue and the respect for difference. The Calouste Gulbenkian International Prize, worth € 100.000, distinguishes each year an individual or organization whose thoughts or actions made a decisive contribution on understanding, defending or fostering the universal values of the human condition, in the field of intercultural dialogue or respect for biodiversity (in alternate years). The Prize is open to individuals or non-profit institutions, regardless of nationality. Prize recipients from previous years in the field of intercultural dialogue include the Peace Research Institute in the Middle East (PRIME), the United Nations High-Commissioner for the Refugees (UNHCR) and the Hand in Hand Center for Jewish-Arab Education.

    The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, based in Lisbon (Portugal) is a non-profit Portuguese foundation, both operating and grantmaking in the fields of arts, science, education and human development. Visit our website for more information about our activities, in Portugal and abroad.

    In 2006, to commemorate its 50th anniversary, the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation established the Calouste Gulbenkian Prizes in order to emphasise the multiple dimensions that influenced the Founder’s, Mr. Calouste Gulbenkian, life and personality. For further information, see the site, or contact:

    Ana Barcelos Pereira
    Office of the President
    Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation
    Avenida de Berna, 45-A
    1067-001 Lisboa
    ( [+ 351] 21 782 3540
    3  [+ 351] 21 782 3035
    apereira@gulbenkian.pt

    Simon Harrison Researcher Profile

    Researcher ProfilesSimon Harrison is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at City University of Hong Kong and author of The Impulse to Gesture: Where language, minds, and bodies intersect (2018, Cambridge University Press).

    Simon Harrison“Having originally focused on form-based approaches to gesture in spoken discourse (specialising in the expression of negation), my view of gesture increasingly integrates notions from multimodal interaction and embodied cognitive science. This has expanded my analytical unit for gesture and attracted me to analysing more complex domains of social and professional interaction. So while I continue to study recurrent aspects of gesture, my latest studies also include eye-gaze in multiactivity among lifeguards (Text & Talk), gesture in assisted performance during collaborative learning (Lingua), embodied interaction in Chinese real estate showrooms (Metaphor & Symbol).

    I am currently involved in two major projects. The Multimodal Corpus of Chinese Academic Written and Spoken English (MuCAWSE) has collected over 24 hours of video-recorded group interaction between students in authentic classrooms of English for Academic Purposes. We are currently processing, transcribing and coding this corpus to run studies of gesture in collaborative discourse and learning. The second major project is a monograph called The Body Language Myth: Understanding gesture in language and communication. This book will scrutinise the global popularity of ‘body language’ and introduce readers to alternative relations between body and language grounded in empirical research instead (i.e. ‘linguistic bodies’ and ‘embodied language’).”