Fulbright Scholar Program 2016

Fulbright U.S. Scholar Awards in Communications and Journalism

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers nearly 500 teaching, research or combination teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty and administrators as well as for professionals, artists, journalists, scientists, lawyers, independent scholars and many others.

This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 100 awards in the field of communications and journalism. Opportunities include:
– Malaysia: Fulbright-MCMC Award for Communications and Multimedia Studies
– Bulgaria: Communications, Journalism and Media
– Swaziland: Mass Communication and Broadcast Journalism

For additional awards in the field of communications and journalism, please visit the CIES website. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in the discipline, and scholar testimonials which highlight the outcomes and benefits associated with completing a Fulbright Scholar grant.

Please check eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines, and review criteria. You may also wish to register for one of our webinars or join My Fulbright, a resource center for applicants interested in the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.

Please contact Sophia Yang with questions about any of the opportunities listed above or the Fulbright Scholar Program in general.

The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world.

Countering Violent Extremism and Interfaith Programming in Tanzania Grant (US DOS)

Countering Violent Extremism and Interfaith Programming in Tanzania
US Department of State
Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor
DRLA-DRLAQM-16-055
Due: March 29, 2016

Project Description
The U.S. Department of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL) announces an open competition for organizations interested in submitting applications for projects that mitigate religious tensions between communities in Tanzania.

DRL’s goal is to mitigate tensions between communities and address drivers of marginalization that exacerbate religious tensions and may contribute to conditions that could lead to violent extremism in Tanzania. Proposals should address and mitigate community tensions, religious or otherwise, and address the drivers of marginalization especially with regards to countering violent extremism. The program approach should seek a durable political process as a solution, including, but not limited to: (1) support at the civil society level including religious leaders and youth on ways to bring together diverse constituencies to promote messages of peace, coexistence, and (2) assisting the implementation of legislation that promotes tolerance and religious diversity.

Projects should have the potential to have an immediate impact leading to long-term sustainable reforms, and should have potential for continued funding beyond DRL resources. DRL prefers innovative and creative approaches rather than projects that simply duplicate or add to efforts by other entities. This does not exclude projects that clearly build off existing successful projects in a new and innovative way from consideration. DRL also strives to ensure its projects advance the rights and uphold the dignity of the most vulnerable or at-risk populations.

Activities that typically are not considered competitive include:
• The provision of large amounts of humanitarian assistance;
• English language instruction;
• Development of high-tech computer or communications software and/or hardware;
• Purely academic exchanges or fellowships;
• External exchanges or fellowships lasting longer than six months;
• Off-shore activities that are not clearly linked to in-country initiatives and impact or that do not relate to security concerns;
• Theoretical explorations of human rights or democracy issues, including projects aimed primarily at research and evaluation that do not incorporate training or capacity-building for local civil society;
• Micro-loans or similar small business development initiatives;
• Activities that go beyond an organization’s demonstrated competence, or fail to provide clear evidence of the ability of the applicant to achieve the stated impact;
• Initiatives directed towards a diaspora community rather than current residents of targeted countries.

The authority for this funding opportunity is found in the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (FAA).

B. Federal Award Information
DRL anticipates having approximately $600,000 available to support successful applications submitted in response to this NOFO, subject to the availability of funding.

Applications should not request less than $300,000 and no more than $600,000. Applicants should include an anticipated start date between June 2016 – August 2016 and the period of performance should be between 18-24 months.

Moscow American Center Program Grant 2016 (Russia)

FY 2016 Moscow American Center Program Funding

The U.S. Embassy in Moscow (PAS Moscow) invites proposal submissions for a cooperative agreement to assist in providing administrative, technical and programmatic support for the American Center program. The American Center at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, is one of approximately 700 American Spaces supported by the Bureau of International Information Programs (IIP) of the U.S. Department of State. The American Center is a technology-forward, welcoming, and engaging environment where Embassy personnel, U.S. visitors, and implementing partners connect with Russians, especially young leaders and young professionals, to inspire dialogue on issues that matter most to U.S.-Russia relations. All applications must be submitted on or before Friday, January 29, 2016, 6 p.m. Moscow Time. Emails that show a time stamp produced by the Department of State system as having been received after 6 p.m. will be ineligible for consideration.

Sponsor: United States Department of State (DOS), U.S. Mission to Russia
Sponsor ID: DOSRUS-16-GR-002

Amount: Upper $350,000
One award is expected

Applicant type: Nonprofit

Interfaith Programming in Eastern and Central Europe

Interfaith Programming in Eastern and Central Europe
Sponsor: United States Department of State (DOS), Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL)
CFDA Numbers: 19.345 – International Programs to Support Democracy, Human Rights and Labor
Amount: Upper $950,000, Lower $650,000

DRL anticipates having approximately $950,000 available to support approximately one successful application submitted in response to this NOFO, subject to the availability of funding. DRL may issue one or more awards resulting from this NOFO to the applicant(s) whose application(s) conforming to this NOFO are the most responsive to the objectives set forth in this NOFO.

Applicant Type: Academic Institution, Commercial, Nonprofit, Small Business
Citizenship or Residency: Unrestricted
Activity location: Europe
Deadline: 18 December 2015

This competition is for projects that encourage tolerance and interfaith understanding between religious groups and among civil society. Projects should work to address the xenophobia that affects Jewish and Muslim populations in Eastern and Central Europe, even in places where their numbers are small. We have seen the persistence of anti-Semitism as part of the culture and folklore of the region, despite the size or even existence of a Jewish population. Programs should seek ways to strengthen broader civic ownership of anti-Semitism and other religious-based hatreds and support ways to challenge these intolerant narratives in ways to make the contemporary diversity of the region more visible. Programs should seek to build interfaith and interethnic coalitions and collaboration within Eastern and Central Europe as well as with Western Europe is encouraged. Ideas for successful program activities could include, but are not limited to: anti-xenophobic messaging through targeted, local language campaigns, especially in communities with large numbers of refugee/asylum seekers and are already under pressure for scarce resources; grassroots activities that work with populations to raise awareness of these issues, particularly with respect to intolerance perpetrated by football fans; transition communities and refugees to address xenophobia and resource issues to mitigate tensions; or programs that build coalitions among host/transit communities and the immigrant population.

Projects should have the potential to have an immediate impact leading to long-term sustainable reforms, and should have potential for continued funding beyond DRL resources. DRL prefers innovative and creative approaches rather than projects that simply duplicate or add to efforts by other entities. This does not exclude projects that clearly build off existing successful projects in a new and innovative way from consideration. DRL also strives to ensure its projects advance the rights and uphold the dignity of the most vulnerable or at-risk populations.