AEJMC South Asian Initiative

South Asia Initiative AEJMCGreetings from the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Media and Journalism! By way of introduction, my name is Deb Aikat. I am a faculty member in UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Media and Journalism. Read my bio here.

In our commitment to the “Global Bridges” theme of the 2015 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) conference in San Francisco, a group of long-standing AEJMC members are convening the South Asia Initiative to bring together AEJMC members with interest and expertise in South Asia and the South Asian diaspora worldwide.

The AEJMC South Asia Initiative will foster cross-disciplinary conversations and collaborative relationships.

We invite you to the inaugural meeting:
~~ Time: 3:15-4:45 p.m., Aug. 7, 2015 (Friday)
~~ Place: Willow Room (B2 Golden Gate Level), San Francisco Marriott Marquis Hotel, San Francisco.
~~ See more details here.

We hope you’ll attend this meeting and share your ideas. Let us know if you are unable to attend the inaugural meeting, but wish to be a part of the AEJMC South Asia Initiative. We also welcome your ideas.

Please share this note with graduate students and colleagues interested in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

S Asia Journalists workshop

South Asia’s Youth at Risk – Multimedia Storytelling by Young Journalists
International Center for Journalists (ICFJ)

Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives are invited to apply to a program that aims to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that will explore topics relating to youth and the risks young people face in the region, while also training the journalists on responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, has two main components.

ICFJ will conduct a six-week online course for 80 journalists on digital expression. During the interactive course, participants will receive an introduction to in-depth reporting, weekly individual feedback from trainers on story progress, and lessons on Internet and document research. They will also learn interview techniques, how to generate support for a complex story in one’s newsroom, how to harness social media for reporting, and how to plan and execute a story plan and a multimedia package. Participants are required to propose story ideas related to the youth in their countries prior to starting the course so that they can rely on the online training to help them develop their stories for more in-depth reporting. The course will be conducted in four languages: English, Hindi, Pashto and Urdu. Daily translation will allow those of all languages to share ideas with the group.

ICFJ will follow the online course with a five-day conference in Colombo, Sri Lanka that will bring together the 30 best participants from the online course who propose the best projects. The projects will be grouped together for regional cooperation. The groupings will help each of the young journalists report their stories in a more responsible and informed way, and create a lasting change in the journalists’ understanding of one another’s cultures. Through these joint reporting projects, audiences throughout the region will benefit from more nuanced and in-depth reporting on critical cultural, religious and social issues. Project selections will be made before the Colombo conference, giving the journalists an opportunity to plan their reporting together. They will also present their projects to the larger conference group. The conference in Colombo will also include panel discussions, site visits and small group breakout meetings.

To apply for this program in English, click here. Applications are due January 1, 2013.

Transnational media CFP

CALL FOR PAPERS

Book Project Title: Community and Transnational Media Trajectories

Community radio in South Asia can be described as a social movement sparked by the proliferation of information technologies, the debates on the digital divide, and lobbying by civil society sectors, calling on nations for not having policies on community media.  The confluence of not-for-profit stakeholdership, the availability of technologies, local youth ingenuity, cautious political will, has spurred the emergence of community radio in several parts of the world especially South Asia. The question pertinent here is why now and why radio? The phenomena of community radio in the South Asian region requires that there be a greater reflection on movements (political, social, cultural) across the world  and not just within S. Asia, where there is a similar coming together of new media technology, local and national political ferment, youth mobilization and resultant efforts at institution building.

This is a request for abstracts of papers from those who are studying emerging socio-cultural-political movements that have resulted in building media systems locally, in opposition to existing hegemonic conglomerate media, thereby creating a cultural shift in how a particular local or global issue is understood.  The submitted papers need to be studies conducted in local contexts and communities using critical and qualitative methodologies and theory, not simply reflective writing. The edited volume for which there is an interested publisher, purports to be a collection of essays that shows communication scholars how to enquire about and understand contemporary situated social movement and media using critical perspectives and theories, especially transnational, post-colonial, feminist studies. Please send an abstract of 500 words, of the desired contribution by August 1 and send the completed paper, pending approval, by October 15. Contact Priya Kapoor, Associate Professor, Portland State University at kapoorp@pdx.edu