ICA 2012

The International Communication Association convention was held from May 23-28, 2012, in Phoenix, AZ. I presented a paper co-authored with Yves Winkin, of the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon entitled “Walk Like a Local: Pedestrian Behavior in the US, France, and China” to the Urban Communication Foundation Preconference.

(Thanks to Casey Lum for both organizing the event, and for the photo of me at the Seminar.) I also served as respondent to a panel entitled “Narrative and Community in Intractable Conflicts.” In addition, the Language and Social Interaction Division honored me with a panel entitled ” Constructing Communities of Scholars: Celebrating the Work of Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz” (thanks to Theresa Castor for organizing the event, and to Liliana Castañeda Rossmann, Teri Harrison, Beth Haslett and Saskia Witteborn for participating).

We continued the tradition of holding a mini-meeting of those members of the Advisory Board of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue who were present at a conference (this time it was Donal Carbaugh and Michael Haley) along with the past and current Presidents of our parent organization, the Council of Communication Associations (Patrice Buzzanell and Linda Steiner).

While at ICA I connected with many international scholars, including some of those I had met or visited during the last year or two of travels: Simon Harrison (met in France, now based in Germany), Ifat Maoz (Israel), Saskia Witteborn (Hong Kong), Vivian Chen (Singapore), and Carla Ganito (Portugal).

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Simon Harrison Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesSimon Harrison is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at City University of Hong Kong and author of The Impulse to Gesture: Where language, minds, and bodies intersect (2018, Cambridge University Press).

Simon Harrison“Having originally focused on form-based approaches to gesture in spoken discourse (specialising in the expression of negation), my view of gesture increasingly integrates notions from multimodal interaction and embodied cognitive science. This has expanded my analytical unit for gesture and attracted me to analysing more complex domains of social and professional interaction. So while I continue to study recurrent aspects of gesture, my latest studies also include eye-gaze in multiactivity among lifeguards (Text & Talk), gesture in assisted performance during collaborative learning (Lingua), embodied interaction in Chinese real estate showrooms (Metaphor & Symbol).

I am currently involved in two major projects. The Multimodal Corpus of Chinese Academic Written and Spoken English (MuCAWSE) has collected over 24 hours of video-recorded group interaction between students in authentic classrooms of English for Academic Purposes. We are currently processing, transcribing and coding this corpus to run studies of gesture in collaborative discourse and learning. The second major project is a monograph called The Body Language Myth: Understanding gesture in language and communication. This book will scrutinise the global popularity of ‘body language’ and introduce readers to alternative relations between body and language grounded in empirical research instead (i.e. ‘linguistic bodies’ and ‘embodied language’).”