CFP Women’s Network of ECREA Workshop (Slovenia)

Women’s Network of ECREA is pleased to invite submissions to a workshop to be held on the 11th April 2017 at the Educational Research Institute, Gerbiceva 62, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

The aim of this year’s international workshop is to tackle some of the (most) relevant issues of the classroom communication today. Amid them are – as identified – classroom experiences with immigrant children which entails also wider analyses and examples of communication among teachers, children and their families. Furthermore, in this vein, we will engage in analysing gendered discourses in education and communication. Contributions dealing with these aspects will be welcomed, as well as those covering wider research areas pertaining to our key words that are: gender, migration and interaction (separately or interconnectedly), possibly in connection with educational discourses and/or media coverage of these discourses.

Organizing committee:

Chair: Valerija Vendramin, Ph. D., senior research associate, Educational Research Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Vice chair: Teija Waaramaa, Ph.D., Docent/Adjunct Professor, Tampere Research Centre for Journalism, Media and Communication (COMET), Faculty of Communication Sciences (COMS), University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland

Vice chair: Tulay Atay-Avsar, Ph. D., Mustafa Kemal University, Faculty of Communication, Department of Journalism, Antakya, Hatay, Turkey

Abstract submission and additional information:
Valerija Vendramin

Registration: Please send a note of confirmation to Valerija Vendramin.

There is no registration fee. Transport, accommodation and meals are at your own expense.

Important dates:
February 20th – call for papers
March 6th – 2nd call for papers
March 21st – deadline for abstract submission
March 27th – notification of acceptance and final program
March 30th – deadline for registration
April 11th – Women’s Network International Workshop, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Reminder: Some years ago Women’s Network of ECREA asked scholars to write an essay of 1–2 pages titled: “Me, my academy and my family”. The essay was “Your Story” about your choices and reconciliation between academic career and family life. Some of us also met in Tallinn University at our workshop in 2013 where we decided to publish a book on this theme.

We would now like to invite scholars to write a longer story/contribution about the reconciliation of your academic career and family life. It could also be more analytically oriented or a combination of both perspectives. The recommended length is 15–25 pages.

The editor-in-chief is Teija Waaramaa. Please contact her for all additional information, submission of articles and the like. (Important: please state your intention beforehand, i.e. before actually submitting a contribution.)

The deadline set for the submission of the contributions is April 9th 2017.

Milton Wolf Seminar on Media & Diplomacy (Austria)

Call for Applications: 2017 Milton Wolf Seminar on Media and Diplomacy
“The Marshall Plan and the Yearning for Transformative Visions”
April 25 – 27, 2017
Diplomatic Academy of Vienna, Austria

Initiated in 2001, the annual Milton Wolf Seminar in Vienna, Austria explores cutting edge issues related to media and diplomacy. It is designed to bring together a diverse group of individuals representing multiple perspectives and nationalities. Attendees include: diplomats, journalists, academics, NGO professionals, and graduate students.

Each year the seminar organizers select approximately 5-10 outstanding advanced MA candidates, PhD students, postdoctoral students, law students, or equivalents studying areas related to the seminar theme to serve as Emerging Scholar Fellows. Selected Fellows receive economy class airfare, accommodation, and a food and local travel stipend, which covers all costs of attending the Seminar. In exchange for full funding, Emerging Scholars attend all seminar discussions and events and serve as a part of the rapporteur team for the event, authoring a 2000-word blog piece documenting and analyzing the seminar discussions.

To apply for the 2017 Emerging Scholars Program, please send your CV, a completed application form, and a cover letter outlining how your areas of research, your methodologies, your regional interests, can be reimagined or enriched through reflections on the history, framing, legacy, or study of the Marshall Plan to Amelia Arsenault by February 15, 2017.

Researching Translanguaging 5 day course (UK)

5-Day residential course
Researching translanguaging: key concepts, methods & issues

June 19th  – June 23rd  2017
School of Education, University of Birmingham

This free 5-day residential course is designed for researchers, including doctoral researchers, who are engaged in research on communication in multilingual contexts. It is being organised by TLANG, Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities (AH/L007096/1), a research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Reserch Council (AHRC) under its theme Translating Cultures. TLANG is a collaboration of seven universities and seven national non-university partners.  It aims to investigate how people communicate in increasingly diverse city settings, and what the implications are for policy and practice in public, private and third sector organisations. Contributions to the residential will also be made by colleagues from the University of Cape Town, also funded by AHRC (ES/M00175X/1), whose focus will be the pedagogic potential, and ideological challenges of translanguaging in multilingual contexts.

Course participants will have access to TLANG’s already established networks as well as future opportunities to take part in its assemblies, city seminars, thematic workshops and international conferences.  TLANG provides a variety of meetings for academics, professionals, activists, artists, and students to share their interest in superdiversity and multilingualism. The 5-day course will also build on previous residential courses held at the University of Birmingham in 2010/11 funded through ESRC’s  Researcher Developer Initiative (RES-046-25-004, RDI).

Researching translanguaging
Linguistic, cultural and demographic changes have been ushered in by transnational population flows, the crisis of war, the changing political and economic landscapes of different world regions, and by the advent of new technologies for social media and online communication. These conditions have created a pressing need for a programme of detailed research which makes visible the ways in which people interact – how they translanguage and translate  – in rapidly-changing social settings.

The last decade has seen the emergence of new strands of research on translanguaging and new lines of enquiry which have incorporated critical and post-structuralist perspectives from social theory and which have embraced  ethical epistemologies and research methods. Different research strategies have been employed in different kinds of sociolinguistic spaces: in local neighbourhoods, across transnational diaspora, in multilingual workplaces, complementary schools/community classes, mainstream educational settings, health care centres, sports clubs, religious gatherings, legal settings, bureaucratic encounters, in the mass media, and on the internet. Researchers have provided detailed accounts of face to face encounters in multilingual settings and in mediated, virtual interactions. They have also explored the interface between spoken and written language use and multimodality, seeking connections between local situated practices and wider social processes.

Translanguaging theorizes communicative practice as repertoire and considers how people deploy their semiotic resources within the ideological contexts in which they operate.  It includes aspects of communication not always thought of as ‘language’, including gesture, dress, posture, and so on; it is a record of mobility and experience; it includes constraints, gaps and silences as well as potentialities; and it is responsive to the places in which, and the people with whom, semiotic resources may be deployed. Because social categories do not correspond straightforwardly to identifiable linguistic forms, we need to adapt our ways of seeing to understand the plurality of repertoires, styles, registers, and genres in play as people communicate.

Translanguaging in research practice
A focus on translanguaging enables us to see how everyday practices and identities are rooted in the trajectories of the multiple communities to which individuals belong, and how they develop and transform. The deployment of diverse communicative repertoires is not only apparent in the social contexts in which we research, but is also manifestly evident in the research teams in which we work. Translanguaging is a significant dimension of research practice in some areas of social science, due to the increasing linguistic and cultural diversity of contemporary society. Furthermore, translanguaging, with its focus on communicative practice, can be studied from an interdisciplinary perspective which can raise difficult questions about what constitutes data, evidence, claim and argumentation. These collaborations across different disciplinary backgrounds, social and linguistic biographies, and professional contexts throw up key epistemological issues and questions relating to researcher identity and to asymmetries of power in the knowledge-building process. This residential will offer a forum for researchers across the social sciences who are working in multilingual settings to engage in dialogue about ways of working and to consider the issues arising from work in multilingual and interdisciplinary teams. It is also hoped that it will serve as a route into research on translanguaging for social scientists who hold a particular interest in linguistic ethnography.

The 5-day residential course at Birmingham
The 5-day course will be organised into sessions, with different themes and orienting theories. The sessions will be led by different members of the TLANG team with our international collaborators from the University of Cape Town. Delegates must commit to full attendance over the full 5 days.

Session 1: Researching translanguaging: why, what and how?
Session 2: Translanguaging as communication: a repertoire approach
Session 3: Translanguaging and superdiversity: an ideological perspective
Session 4: Translanguaging and social media;
Session 5: Translanguaging and cityscapes
Session 6 and 7: Translanguaging in educational settings
Session 8: Translanguaging and multimodality
Session 9: Translanguaging in research practice
Session 10: Translanguaging, engagement and interdisciplinarity

Organisers:
Angela Creese (a.creese AT bham.ac.uk)
Sarah Martin (s.l.martin AT bham.ac.uk)

Applications:
The number of participants is limited to 30, so early application is recommended. Application forms and further details are available on TLANGDEADLINE FOR APPLICATION IS 10TH FEBRUARY 2017. PLACES ANNOUNCED BY 10TH MARCH 2017.

Language and Conflict: Politics of Language and Identity across Contexts (UK)

Language and Conflict: Politics of Language and Identity across Contexts
20 May 2016, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Brunei Gallery, Room B102, SOAS University of London

Keynote speakers:
Prof. Hilary Footitt (University of Reading)
Dr Zoë Marriage (Violence, Peace and Development Research Cluster, SOAS, University of London)

This one day workshop brings together scholars and graduate students working on the role of language in on-going and post-conflict contexts. Examples could include (but are not limited to) the Middle East, Africa, the Balkans, and Western Europe, including diaspora and migration contexts.

Attendance is free and there is no need to register.

A Global Force for Human Rights? (Spain)

Workshop in Seville: ‘A global force for human rights? Assessing the EU’s comprehensive approach to human rights in crisis management and conflict’
March 11, 2016

About the workshop
The workshop will consist of two panels. The first panel will deal with the applicable regulatory frameworks regarding human rights violations in conflicts and the protection of vulnerable groups. The second panel will discuss the integration of human rights and international Humanitarian Law (IHL) and democracy/rule of law principles and tools into the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) and missions and evaluating their impact on vulnerable groups.

The keynote speech is entitled “A Global Force for Human Rights? Preliminary Findings from the FRAME Project” by Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters. Speakers include Prof. Dr. Gerd Oberleitner, University of Graz/ETC Graz; Prof. Dr. Francesco Seatzu, University of Cagliari; Dr. Mikaela Heikkilä, Åbo Akademi University; Prof. Dr. Elisabeth Salmón, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú; Prof. Dr. Cristina Churruca, University of Deusto; Ms. Ines Thevarajah, Human Rights Focal Point at the CPCC (EEAS); and Mr. Gabino Regalado de los Cobos, Colonel, EUTM Mali.

Register
If you would like to attend the workshop, please register with Laura Iñigo.

Programme
The programme of the workshop can be found here.

Abstract
The TEU directs the Union to respect human rights whenever it conducts activities on the international scene, including EU external policies in response to conflicts and crisis situations. The promotion of human rights at the international level is one of the principal objectives of the EU´s external action (Art. 3, para. 5). This principle is formulated in Art. 21, paragraph 2 under the Union´s commitment to `define and pursue common policies and actions, and (to) work for a high degree of cooperation in all fields of international relations, in order to: … b) consolidate and support democracy, the rule of law, human rights and the principles of international law’. In the 2012 Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy and the 2015-2019 Action Plan for its implementation the EU addresses current and anticipates future challenges in the field and indicates solutions to enhance policy effectiveness and coherence, by proposing a comprehensive human rights approach to conflicts and crisis´ (third strategic area of the Action Plan).

This international conference is organised by the Research Group ‘Human Rights and Globalisation’ (SEJ055) of the University of Seville, and aims at discussing the findings of the FRAME project regarding the European Union external policies in response to conflicts and crisis situations. One of the main objectives of FRAME is to survey and analyse contemporary human rights violations especially against vulnerable groups, within the context of conflict and crisis within and among States, between and within communities and their link with historical and cultural factors.

This conference seeks to address ways to prevent and overcome violence through the critical assesment of the instruments available to the EU to integrate human rights, humanitarian law and democracy/rule of law principles in these policies with a focus on vulnerable groups in society (e.g., children, internally displaced persons and refugees).

Venue
The workshop will take place at the Law School of the University of Seville located at the Campus Pirotecnia, Av. Enramadilla 18-20, 41018, Seville (Spain).

CrossCulture Internships (Germany)

Programme information
With its CrossCulture Internships funding programme, the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen (Institute for Foreign Cultural Relations) is advocating intercultural exchange and the strengthening of networks between Germany and Islamic world as a partner of the Federal Foreign Office.

The programme enables internships for young professionals and volunteers from the participating countries and from Germany. International experience is gained and intercultural competence developed through work stays in another culture. CrossCulture internships open up and strengthen the exchange between people, institutions and cultures and thus enable an enhanced partnership between Germany and Islamic countries. Regional particularities are taken into account through the subdivision into three regional modules:
• South Asia
• Central Asia
• Other Islamic countries (particularly in the Middle East, North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula)

Aims of the funding programme
The CrossCulture internships give young people from Germany and Islamic countries the opportunity to gain diverse experience abroad in the context of their working environment and to act as multipliers in their home countries. In addition to further professional development and specialist training, the programme participants also gain an insight into the social and political structures of the host country and become acquainted with cultural characteristics and behavioural patterns through integration into working and everyday life. They make important contacts which they can use when they return to their home country for future collaboration. Interns returning home can offer a valuable contribution to their respective organisations thanks to the experience they have gained abroad. This intercultural exchange thus sustainably strengthens the formation of networks between Germany and the Islamic countries and encourages cross-border dialogue and cooperation.

Areas of emphasis
CrossCulture internships are offered in the following work areas:
• Knowledge society & education
• Legal dialogue, justice & human rights
• International politics & civic education
• Environment
• Economy & development cooperation
• Media
• Culture & art

Islamic countries
Target groups in the Islamic countries are young professionals and volunteers in various areas of civil society and multipliers in reform relevant organisations and media. In the regional modules South Asia and Central Asia, people engaged in the key areas of (social) political development will be specifically targeted.
Germany
For German candidates, the target groups are employees of the corresponding host organisations as well as young professionals and volunteers committed to fields of work in which intercultural experience is crucial.
Organisation of the internship
The internship will last at least six weeks and up to a maximum of three months and will be individually scheduled according to profile, needs and availability. The internships will be supplemented by a tailor-made framework programme – for example, accompanying events or individual visits– during the stay in the host country.

The CrossCulture internships are characterised by the fact that they can be  individually adapted to the requirements and wishes of the scholarship holders both in terms of content and organisation. Thanks to this personalised and needs-oriented concept, they are very well-suited in supporting the programme participants to acquire professional and intercultural competence in their specific area of work and thus extending their ability to engage in dialogue.

Call for Editors: Human Communication Research, and Communication, Culture & Critique

Call for Nominations
Editor for Human Communication Research

The International Communication Association Publications Committee is soliciting nominations for editor of Human Communication Research to succeed John Courtright, whose terms ends at the close of 2016.  We expect the next editor will be appointed to a four-year term at the June ICA Board Meeting and begin receiving manuscripts shortly thereafter. A completed nomination package should include a letter from the candidate indicating a willingness to serve and a vision for the journal (including vision for use of Associate Editors), a CV, contact information for three references who are scholars familiar with the candidate’s work and skill set necessary to edit the journal, and a letter of institutional support from the candidate’s home institution.  Details about the editorship are available through the following links:
Publication Policies and Procedures
Human Communication Research Annual Report, page 86

Human Communication Research concentrates on presenting empirical work in any area of human communication. The special brief of the journal is to advance understanding of human symbolic processes, so there is a strong emphasis on theory-driven research, the development of new theoretical models in communication, and the development of innovative methods for observing and measuring communication behavior. The journal has a broad social science focus, so it should appeal to scholars in communication from psychology, sociology, linguistics, and anthropology, as well as areas of communication science. The journal maintains a broad behavioral and social scientific focus but reflects no particular methodological or substantive bias.

Nominations should be submitted electronically by 1 December 2015. Self-nominations are welcomed.

In 2015, the ICA Publications Committee also expressed a willingness to consider editorial teams, in lieu of a single editor, for nomination. In such circumstances, an editorial team would need to provide an additional statement indicating the division of effort and management procedures the editorial team will establish, including a single chief editor for correspondence with the publisher.

Address queries and nominations to:
Elisia L. Cohen, Chair, ICA Publications Committee


Call for Nominations
Editor for Communication, Culture, & Critique

The International Communication Association Publications Committee is soliciting nominations for editor of Communication, Culture and Critique to succeed Radhika Parameswaran, whose term ends at the close of 2016. We expect the next editor will be appointed to a four-year term at the June ICA Board Meeting and begin receiving manuscripts shortly thereafter. A completed nomination package should include a letter from the candidate indicating a willingness to serve and a vision for the journal (including vision for use of Associate Editors), a CV, contact information for three references who are scholars familiar with the candidate’s work and skill set necessary to edit the journal, and a letter of institutional support from the candidate’s home institution.  Details about the editorship are available through the following links:
Publication Policies and Procedures
Communication, Culture, & Critique’s Annual Report, page 89.

Communication, Culture, & Critique publishes critical, interpretive, and qualitative research examining the role of communication and cultural criticism in today’s world. The journal welcomes high quality research and analyses from diverse theoretical and methodological approaches from all fields of communication, media and cultural studies. Sites for enquiry include all kinds of text- and print-based media, as well as broadcast, still and moving images and electronic modes of communication including the internet and mobile telephony.

Nominations should be submitted electronically by 1 December 2015. Self-nominations are welcomed.

In 2015, the ICA Publications Committee also expressed a willingness to consider editorial teams, in lieu of a single editor, for nomination. In such circumstances, an editorial team would need to provide an additional statement indicating the division of effort and management procedures the editorial team will establish, including a single chief editor for correspondence with the publisher.

Address queries and nominations to:
Elisia L. Cohen, Chair, ICA Publications Committee

Journalists-Science immersion

Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting Invites Journalists to Apply for Science Immersion Workshop

The Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting is accepting applications for its fifteenth annual Science Immersion Workshop for Journalists, the theme of which this year is global change in coastal ecosystems.

The workshop, which runs from June 9 through June 14 at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, is a professional development experience that gives journalists an opportunity to explore and understand the effects of global change in coastal ecosystems, using Narragansett Bay as a living laboratory. The fellowship explores scientific research methods as well as the principles and ethics that guide scientific inquiry. Journalists also will learn how to interpret scientific publications and sharpen their investigative reporting skills.

Early to mid-career journalists from all media with a demonstrated interest in science and environmental reporting and a desire to learn about basic science through field and lab work are invited to apply.

The fellowship includes room, board, tuition, and up to $500 to support travel. Non-U.S. applicants must include a written statement indicating that they can secure full travel funds and obtain the appropriate visa.

Metcalf also offers seminars and workshops for journalists.

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Global Xchange

“Global Xchange is a six-month exchange program which gives young people from different countries a unique opportunity to live and volunteer together, to develop and share valuable skills and to make a practical contribution where it is needed in each local community.

In 2010, the first-ever multilateral Global Xchange connected youth and community activists from six countries: USA, France, UK, South Africa, Sierra Leone and Rwanda. The multilateral exchange was broken in two phases for the two age groups, focused on shorter-term professional development exchanges and longer volunteer placements.

First, community leaders from the six countries went to Durban, South Africa, January 17 to February 6, followed by an exchange in Belfast, Northern Ireland from March 7 to 27. Members of the adult exchange will be placed at local organizations to job shadow, exchange best practices, and explore cross-cultural approaches to serving at-risk youth. The US participants were selected from five Los Angeles nonprofits: Street Poets, Create Now, Reach LA, Homeboy Industries, and LA’s BEST. Stay tuned for videos and blog posts from the LA participants.

In the second phase, groups of 18-24 year-olds from each country will volunteer for three months in Durban and then for three months in Belfast between June and December.”

For further information, see their website.

DC Internships available

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
Washington D.C. Summer Fellowship Program
Consortium for Media Policy Studies (COMPASS)

The Annenberg Schools for Communication at the Universities of Pennsylvania and Southern California, and the Departments of Communication at the Universities of Illinois and Michigan are pleased to announce a new collaborative summer fellowship program, designed to provide Ph.D. students in Communication and Media Studies with hands on experience in the development and implementation of communication policy. Fellows would intern (8-weeks from mid-June to mid-August) in DC-based government offices or agencies, think tanks, political party or advocacy organizations, or other communication-related public or private sector institutions. All Fellows would also participate in an orientation prior to beginning their internship, and a follow-up retreat at which they will share their experiences and how these experiences might be connected to their research and teaching with a small group of scholars and practitioners.

Fellowships include assistance in locating an appropriate internship placement, a stipend of $5,000, and travel expenses for attending the follow-up retreat. Students’ home graduate institutions are expected to provide support for housing/expenses in DC ($2,000), though a limited number of scholarships are available if home institutions are unable to provide support.

Up to eight fellowships are available for the summer 2011. Candidates for these fellowships must Ph.D. students in Communication or Media Studies, and must be nominated by their home department or school (applicants must be US citizens, or international students enrolled in US institutions and holding student visas).  Applications should include: (1) a brief nomination letter from the department/school indicating whether or not you would be able to provide $2,000 in housing support and living expenses; (2) a letter of recommendation from the student’s advisor or another faculty member familiar with the student’s work/ability: and (3) a letter from the student indicating how a summer internship would connect to/enhance his or her research and/or teaching, and what kind of placement would be most useful in this regard.

Completed applications are due no later than Monday, February 28, 2011 and should be sent Larry Gross [lpgross@usc.edu]. Students who have been accepted will be notified by Monday, March 14, at which point the placement process would begin.

The Washington D.C. Summer Fellowship Program is a project of the Consortium for Media Policy Studies (COMPASS) and is made possible through the generous support of the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands.

COMPASS Co-Directors:
Michael X. Delli Carpini, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
Susan Douglas, Depart of Communication Studies, University of Michigan
Larry Gross, Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, University of Southern California
Robert McChesney, Department of Communication, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign