Transnational media CFP

CALL FOR PAPERS

Book Project Title: Community and Transnational Media Trajectories

Community radio in South Asia can be described as a social movement sparked by the proliferation of information technologies, the debates on the digital divide, and lobbying by civil society sectors, calling on nations for not having policies on community media.  The confluence of not-for-profit stakeholdership, the availability of technologies, local youth ingenuity, cautious political will, has spurred the emergence of community radio in several parts of the world especially South Asia. The question pertinent here is why now and why radio? The phenomena of community radio in the South Asian region requires that there be a greater reflection on movements (political, social, cultural) across the world  and not just within S. Asia, where there is a similar coming together of new media technology, local and national political ferment, youth mobilization and resultant efforts at institution building.

This is a request for abstracts of papers from those who are studying emerging socio-cultural-political movements that have resulted in building media systems locally, in opposition to existing hegemonic conglomerate media, thereby creating a cultural shift in how a particular local or global issue is understood.  The submitted papers need to be studies conducted in local contexts and communities using critical and qualitative methodologies and theory, not simply reflective writing. The edited volume for which there is an interested publisher, purports to be a collection of essays that shows communication scholars how to enquire about and understand contemporary situated social movement and media using critical perspectives and theories, especially transnational, post-colonial, feminist studies. Please send an abstract of 500 words, of the desired contribution by August 1 and send the completed paper, pending approval, by October 15. Contact Priya Kapoor, Associate Professor, Portland State University at kapoorp@pdx.edu

Intercultural Dialogue through Community Media

The Near Media Co-op is seeking 8 participants (4 Irish and 4 non-EU nationals) to take part in a new project, “Intercultural Dialogue through Community Media.”

Participants will complete a FETAC Level 4 course in community radio and form a production team to create a series of 13 radio programmes on the theme of intercultural dialogue to be broadcast on Near90fm. The project will run from late April to mid-September 2011 and participants will be required to attend one full day per week for 7 weeks for FETAC training and thereafter 3 hours per week, for planning and producing the radio series. If you are an Irish or non-EU national interested in participating or would like further information, please contact the project coordinator:

grace@near.ie
Or on 01 848 5211

This project is co-financed by the European Commission under the European Integration Fund and is supported by the Office of the Minister for Integration and Pobal.

International discources about audiences

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Discourses about Audiences: International Comparisons
Deadline:   May 1, 2011

We seek proposals from media scholars to study the representations of audiences in non-western societies and pre-modern Europe. We use “western” to indicate culture rather than geography. In that sense, the term contrasts to all societies not based upon Western traditions, including not only “eastern” societies but also societies south of the equator.

We plan to publish the studies in special issues of journals and as an edited book, in multiple languages. We also plan to organize an international conference where the authors will present and discuss their work.

In our books, The Citizen Audience and Audiences and Publics, we have explored representations of audiences and the categories used to characterize them. These explorations have been within the context of modern democracies in Western Europe and North America. In Western discourse, audiences have been variously considered crowds, publics, mass and consumers, active or passive, additive or selective, vulnerable and suggestible or critical and creative, educated or ignorant, high or low brow, and characterized differently on the basis of their presumed race, class, sex and age.

These debates and these categories sometimes have been adopted and applied to audiences in non-Western cultures. The conjoined terms “audiences and publics,” for example, have begun to be used by scholars across the globe. But there is no reason to assume that such Western categories and associations apply, or apply in the same way, in non-western societies. At a time when global and regional media (satellite, television/radio, recording, mobile phone, internet) saturate even remote populations and cultures, we have no comparative empirical studies to reveal what categories are indigenous to individual non-western cultures, and to record  how they differ and change.

Consequently our goal is to bring together research from across the globe, to investigate whether the terms associated with audiences in western Europe and North America actually fit the indigenous discourses on audiences in non-Western cultures. Each culture likely has a different and interesting history. We think that such a comparative study of discourse on media and audiences could bring new insights into global media as well as Western discourse and scholarship on media and audiences, and be of immense value to government policymakers and media practitioners as well. Moreover, it will be an opportunity for non-Western worlds to speak about themselves, unfiltered through Western concepts.

The project will explore specifically non-Western languages and cultures, and as a whole, will compare their discourses on audiences. In this globalized world this will sometimes be a marginal distinction, given the bleeding of Western ideas through borders and cultural boundaries. We would like applicants to go beyond non-Western incorporations of Western terms about audiences that accompanied their adoption of media technology and texts, to explore their discourses on indigenous practices and their audiences. With this foundation, then applicants would investigate how indigenous discourses represent media audiences as these media spread through these societies.

From all applicants, we will select 10-15 scholars to research discourses in their proposed culture and language, looking at these both before and since their contact with Western culture and the spread of twentieth and twenty-first century media. We expect to include:

1. Studies on discourses in major languages of the world, e.g. Chinese, Hindi, Bengali, Arabic, Urdu, etc.,

2. Studies on cultures and languages less integrated into globalization and more remote from Western influence, and

3. A study of a major medieval European culture and language before democracy and publics became associated with audiences.

Applicants should be fluent in the language and generally familiar with the media/audience history of the culture they propose to study. For their research, we wish contributors to study representations in that culture and language, examining its historical development, in whole or part, of discourses as media are introduced into that culture through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with special consideration to the lexicon used to characterize media audiences. Junior as well as senior scholars are welcome, as long as each demonstrates his/her capabilities for this research.

Proposals should be in English and include a preliminary research plan of no more than 3 single-spaced pages, specifying the cultural/linguistic context and describing the plan of research. as well as current vitae of the applicant(s). Send proposals as email attachments to both Butsch@rider.edu and S.Livingstone@lse.ac.uk, no later than May 1, 2011.

We look forward to reading your proposals.

Richard Butsch, Professor of Sociology, American Studies, and Film and Media Studies, Rider University, USA

Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Social Psychology, Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics,  UK

Visiting Researcher Stipend

UCLA Film & Television Archive
UCLA Film & Television Archive is pleased to announce a Visiting Researcher Stipend for 2011. One stipend in the amount of $3,000 is available this year. The purpose of the stipend is to:
– Support the work of scholars by awarding funding to offset expenses associated with a research visit to the UCLA Film & Television Archive.
– Encourage research access to moving image collections held by the UCLA Film & Television Archive. Applications are open to current university/college students, faculty, and staff from all disciplines.

Application materials must be postmarked no later than April 15, 2011. Made possible by a grant from the Myra Reinhard Family Foundation.

About the Archive’s Collections: UCLA Film & Television Archive holds over 250,000 films and television programs produced from the 1890s to the present. The collection includes independent and studio-produced shorts and feature films, advertising and industrial films, documentaries, local and network TV programming, commercials, news and public affairs broadcasts, and 27 million feet of newsreels produced between 1919 and 1971.

Mark Quigley
Archive Research & Study Center
UCLA Film & Television Archive
310.206.5389
310.206.5392 [fax]
arsc@ucla.edu

Global Media Journal – call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS
Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition
Volume 4, Issue 1 (2011)
Multi-cultural, Multi-ethnic, and Multi-faith Communication
Guest Editors:
Dr. Mahmoud Eid
Dr. Isaac Nahon-Serfaty
Dr. Rukhsana Ahmed

Human beings with different cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds share the globe and communicate together on interpersonal, organizational, and international levels. Globalization, new communication technologies, media conglomerations, trade agreements, and even military treaties have virtually removed borders among nations. New media technologies, for example, have created new communicative spaces, forms, and strategies that transcend face-to-face and nation-to-nation communication barriers; yet, cultural, ethnic, and religious differences remain. This highlights the significance of the cultural, ethnic, and religious dimensions of human communication, as well as the interrelated relationship among them; culture usually arises from various ethnic groups, and each ethnic group does not necessarily follow one religious tradition (i.e., faith).

Communication is at the heart of any culture, ethnicity, and religion. People become more engaged in contexts where communication reflects on their cultural, ethnic, or religious identity. Hence, it is crucial to look deeply into, and compare, how people from differing cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds communicate among themselves, and across cultures, ethnicities, and religions. Cultural, ethnic, and religious differences are causing communication problems; hence, communicators should be careful, enduring, and forgiving, rather than imprudent, intolerant, and hostile. Discussions about culture, ethnicity, or religion can be empowering, but can also at times be disturbing.

Many contemporary societies are proud of their diversity in culture, ethnicity, and faith; however, cultural, ethnic, and religious communication forms have not been yet sufficiently or effectively embraced in such societies. It is evident in many of such societies that cultural exclusivity, ethnic stereotyping, racial discrimination or xenophobia, and religious intolerance are prevalent. There have also been various biases and crimes/violence against those perceived as “others” in such societies. Recent global debates demonstrate the extent to which communication, including traditional and new media, can be a disruptive force when focusing only on the most negative aspects of certain cultural, ethnic, or religious practices, particularly those related to fundamentalist views. However, communication can also be powerful in bringing people of different cultures, ethnicities, and faiths together in mutual understanding and cooperation.

Communication can help avoid inter-cultural, inter-racial, or inter-religious clashes; it can promote peace, patience, tolerance, and understanding, deepen public knowledge about religious traditions and practices, promote dialogue and mutual understanding among different religious traditions and between religious and secular visions of the world, and shape public perceptions of cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity. This issue will focus on the role of multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-faith communication in contemporary societies, covering a variety of themes and cases from global perspectives. It welcomes analytic, critical, empirical, or comparative submissions that discuss the most recent debates and discourses about, but not limited to, the following topics:

•    forms of cultural, ethnic, and religious communication
•    theories and concepts in cultural, ethnic, and religious communication
•    effective or ineffective multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-faith communication
•    traditional or new media and culture, ethnicity, and religion
•    social integration and multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-faith communication
•    rights and freedoms of ethnic and religious groups in contemporary societies
•    inter-cultural, cross-cultural, and multi-cultural communication
•    ethnic and religious media
•    intercultural, interethnic, and interfaith dialogue
•    multiculturalism, pluralism, and diversity
•    media representations of culture, ethnicity, and religion

The Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition welcomes high-quality, original submissions on related topics to the above theme. Submissions are expected to develop communication and media theories, report empirical and analytical research, present critical discourses, apply theories to case studies, and set out innovative research methodologies. The Journal is bilingual (English and French) open-access online academic refereed publication that aims to advance research and understanding of communication and media in Canada and around the globe.

Deadline: March 15th, 2011

Submissions: Papers (5,000 to 7,500 words), review articles of more than one book (2,500 to 3,000 words), and book reviews (1,000 to 1,200 words).

Method: All manuscripts must be submitted electronically as Word Document attachments, directly to Dr. Mahmoud Eid (gmj@uottawa.ca).

Guidelines

Decision: April 30th, 2011

Publication: June 15th, 2011

Online dialogue: UK and Arab world

“We are looking for a motivated group of 13 young people from across the UK, to participate in an exciting new joint project between the British Youth Council and the British Council’s Global Changemakers Middle East and North Africa (MENA) programme, where we are giving you the chance to join other young people from the MENA region in a series of online digital dialogues exploring in depth common issues such as identity, education, health, climate change and more. 

If this sounds like something you are interested in why not apply!
Criteria
You must be…
● Aged between 17 and 25 and resident in the UK.
● Motivated and willing to learn and overcome new challenges.
● Able to commit for 6 months until June 2011.
● Have regular internet access
● Available for an hour a week to check the online Facebook group for updates and to answer any questions posted by other members of the community (this may be more during weeks of dialogue) and to read some resources to prepare you for the dialogue.
As a participant we will give you the opportunity to…
● Develop relationships & explore common issues with young people from the MENA region.
● Get training in facilitation skills and intercultural dialogue.
● Be supported to develop a community action project in partnership with young people from the MENA region.
● Possibly have the chance to attend a Global Changemakers meeting representing young people in the UK.”
For further information, and an application form, see the original posting.

Media and Intercultural Relations

“On the occasion of the international ceremony of the Anna Lindh Journalist Award 2010 – taking place in the Principality of Monaco on Thursday 14 October 2010 – a roundtable event is being organized on the theme of ‘Media and Intercultural Relations in the Euro-Mediterranean region’.
The debate, which will involve renowned media experts and Mediterranean personalities, will open with a presentation of the 2010 ‘Anna Lindh Report on Euro-Mediterranean Intercultural Trends’ which has a thematic focus on the impact of media on public perceptions across the two shores of the Mediterranean.
According to the report findings, nearly four-fifths of people questioned in eight European countries and two-thirds of those questioned in five countries in the southern and eastern Mediterranean (SEM) were unable to recall coming across anything in the media recently that had enhanced their view of people in the ‘other’ group.
At the same time, the report places emphasis on the promotion of new media formats and entertainment media, whether film, real-life narratives or talent contests, as tools to reach a broad audience and demonstrate the diversity and richness of Euro-Mediterranean societies by providing examples of intercultural co-existence.
The Anna Lindh Foundation for the Dialogue between Cultures is a €7 million EU-funded project which aims at bringing people and organisations of the region closer and promoting dialogue, by offering them opportunities to work together on projects in the fields of culture, education, science, human rights, sustainable development, the empowerment of women and the arts.”
The original article has links to the entire report, which may be downloaded as a PDF in English or French.