CFP International Communication and Development

Call for papers
Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition 2016: Volume 9, Issue 1
International Communication and Development

Guest Editors:
Dr. Jean-Jacques Bogui
Dr. Carmen Rico
Dr. Christian Agbobli
Dr. Oumar Kane
(Université du Québec à Montréal)

In the late 1950s, a reflection on the potential of the media as a vector for development opened a communicational perspective on international development issues. For the proponents of this approach, it was enough to inject into the social body a certain amount of technical knowledge, which facilitated the flow of information causing a positive reaction of Third World populations to social, technological, and economic progress. Critics of this approach were numerous and took shape in the response of dependency theories. The emergence of international communication and development research field was partly the result of this heated debate.

This field of research has experienced a second wave due to work of the MacBride Commission initiated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The work of this committee focused on communication systems, such as the impact of international communication on national development and influence of transnational corporations in Third World countries. The oppressive cultural North/South relations resulting from the stranglehold of North media organizations over those of Third World has attracted attention. The commission called for a North/South dialogue to promote the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) and encouraged the promotion of alternative media as opposed to mass media. The 1980 MacBride report entitled Many Voices One World that resulted from the work of the commission crystallized debates and issues around the question of an information and communication order at the core of which were the international news agencies.

In the early 1990s, a new approach to the field of international communication and development emphasized the importance of telecommunications infrastructure in the development process. The World Summits on the Information Society (WSIS) held in Geneva (Switzerland) in 2003 and in Tunis (Tunisia) in 2005 gave prominent attention to the question of the digital divide between the North and the South. Thus, an important debate appears in this field. On one hand, views based on econometric studies defend the thesis that there is a correlation between the rate of equipment telecommunications infrastructure and economic development, given that information and communication technologies are another chance to allow Third World countries to catch up with the West (leapfrogging). On the other hand, critics of a techno-deterministic utopia fiercely oppose this theoretical approach.

In the last few years we assisted to a broadening of the problematization with the inclusion of social and political aspects (sustainable development, gender issues, human rights, ICT and social movements, public sphere, governance, postcolonial studies, etc.).

This special issue dedicated to international communication and development will revisit this field of study. It will also address new approaches that have emerged in the context of globalization and emerging technologies. This special issue seeks theoretical, analytic, critical, empirical, and comparative submissions that specifically discuss, but are not limited to, the following topics:
-Information Technology and development
-Digital divide and digital solidarity
-Digital technologies and world conflicts
-Communication and international politics
-Globalization of information
-Communication and cultural diversity
-Imperialism and cultural domination

The Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition welcomes high-quality, original submissions on related topics to the above theme. Authors are strongly encouraged to contribute to the development of communication and media theories, report empirical and analytical research or present case studies, use critical discourses, and/or set out innovative research methodologies. The Journal is a bilingual (English and French) open-access online academic refereed publication that aims to advance research and understanding of communication and media in Canada and around the globe.

Deadline: March 15th, 2016
Submissions: Papers (5,000 to 7,500 words), review articles of more than one book (2,500 to 3,000 words), and book reviews (1,000 to 1,200 words).
Method:  All manuscripts must be submitted electronically as Word Document attachments, directly to Dr. Jean-Jacques Bogui.
Guidelines Available
Decision: April 30th, 2016
Publication: June 15th, 2016

CFP Multicultural Media and Immigrant Integration

CALL FOR PAPERS
Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition Vol 8, Iss 2 (2015) Multicultural Media and Immigrant Integration
Guest Editor: Dr. Rukhsana Ahmed, University of Ottawa

Multicultural media, also known as “ethnic media”, consisting of print, broadcast, and electronic media and intended for ethno-cultural communities, are important resources for immigrants. These diverse forms of media play an important role in meeting different information needs of immigrants.
For example, multicultural media are important sources of, and channels for the delivery of settlement, government, ethno-cultural, and home country news, information, and services for immigrants.

The proliferation of multicultural media during recent decades has produced much scholarly and journalistic works, which have focused on multicultural media’s function in helping immigrants adapt and adjust to the new host country and preserve their cultural heritage, as well as in contributing to their social isolation in the host country. The role of multicultural media in immigrants’ inclusion/segregation in the host society remains a growing concern among researchers and practitioners. With the changing media landscape through the rise of the Internet, the proliferation of digital media and the growth of mobile devices, as well as international migration increasing in scale, it has become all the more important for researchers and practitioners to further discuss, debate, and document different aspects of the role of multicultural media in the integration of immigrants.

This special issue of the Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition aims to address opportunities and challenges that multicultural media represent for immigrant integration, from a multidisciplinary perspective, including communication, media studies, information studies, geography, political science, political economy, sociology, law, international relations, and other fields. To that end, the special issue will consider theoretical, analytic, critical, empirical, and comparative submissions on topics that include, but not limited to:
▪ challenges of multicultural media ▪ concepts and theories relevant to the study of multicultural media ▪ immigrants’ access to, and experiences with multicultural media ▪ multicultural media and immigrants’ civic engagement ▪ multicultural media and immigrants’ healthcare, socio-economic, and security issues ▪ multicultural media and social inclusion: sense of belonging and community building ▪ multicultural media uses and gratifications ▪ multiculturalism, integration, and social cohesion ▪ the role of multicultural media in immigrants’ integration into society

The Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition welcomes high- quality, original submissions on related topics to the above theme. Authors are strongly encouraged to contribute to the development of communication and media theories, report empirical and analytical research or present case studies, use critical discourses, and/or set out innovative research methodologies. The Journal is bilingual (English and French) open-access online academic refereed publication that aims to advance research and understanding of communication and media in Canada and around the globe.

Deadline: September 15th, 2015
Submissions: Papers (5,000 to 7,500 words), review articles of more than one book (2,500 to 3,000 words), and book reviews (1,000 to 1,200 words).
Method: All manuscripts must be submitted electronically as Word Document attachments to Dr. Rukhsana Ahmed.
Guidelines available
Decision: October 30th, 2015
Publication: December 15th, 2015

CFP Financialization, Communication, and New Imperialism

Call for Papers – Fall 2014 Issue, Global Media Journal

Theme of Fall 2014 Issue, Global Media Journal: Financialization, Communication, and New Imperialism

Guest Editors:
Mohan J. Dutta, National University of Singapore
Mahuya Pal, University of South Florida

The global financial crisis marks on one hand the ruptures in the universalized logic of neoliberal capitalism as a framework of global development, and on the other hand, narrates the story of the increasing consolidation of power in the hands of the global elite achieved through the language of the free market. As wehave argued in our earlier work on globalization and communication, meanings constitute the center of global financialization, consolidation of wealth in the hands of the global elite, and the deployment of technocratic efficiency as the solution to development narrowly conceived as economic growth (Dutta, 2011; Pal & Dutta, 2008). Even as these shifts in global power depict the newnetworks of power that operate globally, connecting spaces of resource consolidation, the relationships of power are played out in uneven terrains of global flows, reflecting the inequalities between geographic spaces. In these relationships of space, power, and finance, meanings offer guiding frameworks as they create the bases for the values, taken for granted assumptions, anddiscourses of practice. Of utmost importance in these shifts of power are the networks of finance that reify and reproduce global patterns of inequalities. What then are the key meanings that circulate in these spaces of finance and what is the relationship of these meanings to the old and new imperialisms that mark the globe. This special issue of “Financialization, Communication, and New Imperialism” will explore the interpenetrating networks of meaning incontemporary global capitalism. We invite both theoretical as well as methodological pieces that explore the role of communication in the financialization of the global economy.

Broad topics include, but are not limited to:
– Meanings of finance in global networks
– The ways in which discourse works to constitute and reproduce global financial policies
– The uses of communication to establish financial policies
– Reproduction of financial identities andrelationships in global spaces of capital
– The articulations of state, market, and capital in new networks of new imperialism(s)
– Relationships between old and new forms of imperialism, the overarching role of financialization, and the constitutive role of communication.

Graduate student research: In keeping with the mission of the Global Media Journal to provide opportunities for graduate student publication, this issue will have a graduate research section edited by Mahuya Pal, University of South Florida. Manuscripts must be submitted electronically. Please check submission guidelines.
Abstracts are due by July 1, 2014; acceptance will be sent by July 15, and full papers are due by September 1, 2014.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to guest editor Mohan J. Dutta, National University of Singapore at . Direct graduate student research inquiries to Mahuya Pal, University of South Florida.

GMJ-American Edition is abstracted and indexed in the ProQuest CSA, Scopus, and EBSCO. Listed in DOAJ and Ulrich’s.  It is an official publication of the Global Communication Association in conjunction with the Center for Global Studies, Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, Indiana, USA. Its global editions are supported by their respective universities around the world.

References:
Dutta, M. (2011). Communicating social change: Structure, culture, agency. New York: Routledge.
Pal, M., & Dutta, M. J. (2008). Theorizing resistance in a global context: processes, strategies and tactics in communication scholarship. In C. Beck (Ed.), Communication Yearbook, 32, 41-87. New York, NY: Routledge.

Global Media Journal call

CALL FOR PAPERS

Global Media Journal-American Edition – Special Spring 2012 Issue
“The State of Media Conglomeration: Synergy, Power, Resistance”
Deadline for Submissions: October 15, 2011

The focus of this special issue of the Global Media Journal-American Edition:  Is “Big Media” dead and buried, or alive and prospering-or both?

In May 2009, Newsweek magazine eulogized “Big Media” in the aftermath of Time Warner CEO Jeffrey Bewkes’ announcement that the corporation would spin off AOL, noting that “the long-suffering Vertically Integrated Media Conglomerate (1989-2009) passed away” and suggesting that synergy was an “overhyped” business model.

Yet in early 2011, the Federal Communications Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice approved Comcast’s 51% stake in General Electric’s NBC Universal, creating what the New York Times called, “a media powerhouse.” Comcast, the largest cable company in the United States, longed to own a major media company before its purchase of NBC Universal, as evidenced by several failed attempts to purchase Disney in recent years.  Furthermore, in 2011, AT&T announced the purchase of T-Mobile for $39 billion, which, if approved by governmental regulatory agencies, will create the largest mobile phone company and again consolidate the industry into two main players.  On the other hand, Google’s attempted purchase of social shopping site Groupon for a price of $6 billion was rejected, largely acknowledged as due to fears by Groupon that the acquisition would invoke anti-trust action toward Google.  Elsewhere, though, the largest media conglomerates, including Disney, Viacom, News Corporation, and Time Warner, appeared to be continuing their quest to purchase digital and traditional media outlets.

In light of these paradoxes, articles for this special issue may address (but are not limited to) matters such as:  the use of new synergistic strategies to create barriers to entry, corporate power and media, the use of social media technologies as resistance to dominant corporate practices and content, consolidation in the telecommunications industries, the viability of transnational and transindustrial media corporations, and alternative democratic communication systems.

Graduate Student Research:  In keeping with the mission of the journal to provide opportunities for graduate student publication, this special issue of Global Media Journal will have a graduate research section.  For submission guidelines, see this site. All papers must be submitted via electronic attachment.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Dr. Jennifer Proffitt, Florida State University, jproffitt@fsu.edu, and Graduate student submissions and queries should be directed to Dr. Doug Tewksbury, Niagara University, dtewksbury@niagara.edu.

Global Media Journal – call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS
Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition
Volume 4, Issue 1 (2011)
Multi-cultural, Multi-ethnic, and Multi-faith Communication
Guest Editors:
Dr. Mahmoud Eid
Dr. Isaac Nahon-Serfaty
Dr. Rukhsana Ahmed

Human beings with different cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds share the globe and communicate together on interpersonal, organizational, and international levels. Globalization, new communication technologies, media conglomerations, trade agreements, and even military treaties have virtually removed borders among nations. New media technologies, for example, have created new communicative spaces, forms, and strategies that transcend face-to-face and nation-to-nation communication barriers; yet, cultural, ethnic, and religious differences remain. This highlights the significance of the cultural, ethnic, and religious dimensions of human communication, as well as the interrelated relationship among them; culture usually arises from various ethnic groups, and each ethnic group does not necessarily follow one religious tradition (i.e., faith).

Communication is at the heart of any culture, ethnicity, and religion. People become more engaged in contexts where communication reflects on their cultural, ethnic, or religious identity. Hence, it is crucial to look deeply into, and compare, how people from differing cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds communicate among themselves, and across cultures, ethnicities, and religions. Cultural, ethnic, and religious differences are causing communication problems; hence, communicators should be careful, enduring, and forgiving, rather than imprudent, intolerant, and hostile. Discussions about culture, ethnicity, or religion can be empowering, but can also at times be disturbing.

Many contemporary societies are proud of their diversity in culture, ethnicity, and faith; however, cultural, ethnic, and religious communication forms have not been yet sufficiently or effectively embraced in such societies. It is evident in many of such societies that cultural exclusivity, ethnic stereotyping, racial discrimination or xenophobia, and religious intolerance are prevalent. There have also been various biases and crimes/violence against those perceived as “others” in such societies. Recent global debates demonstrate the extent to which communication, including traditional and new media, can be a disruptive force when focusing only on the most negative aspects of certain cultural, ethnic, or religious practices, particularly those related to fundamentalist views. However, communication can also be powerful in bringing people of different cultures, ethnicities, and faiths together in mutual understanding and cooperation.

Communication can help avoid inter-cultural, inter-racial, or inter-religious clashes; it can promote peace, patience, tolerance, and understanding, deepen public knowledge about religious traditions and practices, promote dialogue and mutual understanding among different religious traditions and between religious and secular visions of the world, and shape public perceptions of cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity. This issue will focus on the role of multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-faith communication in contemporary societies, covering a variety of themes and cases from global perspectives. It welcomes analytic, critical, empirical, or comparative submissions that discuss the most recent debates and discourses about, but not limited to, the following topics:

•    forms of cultural, ethnic, and religious communication
•    theories and concepts in cultural, ethnic, and religious communication
•    effective or ineffective multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-faith communication
•    traditional or new media and culture, ethnicity, and religion
•    social integration and multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-faith communication
•    rights and freedoms of ethnic and religious groups in contemporary societies
•    inter-cultural, cross-cultural, and multi-cultural communication
•    ethnic and religious media
•    intercultural, interethnic, and interfaith dialogue
•    multiculturalism, pluralism, and diversity
•    media representations of culture, ethnicity, and religion

The Global Media Journal — Canadian Edition welcomes high-quality, original submissions on related topics to the above theme. Submissions are expected to develop communication and media theories, report empirical and analytical research, present critical discourses, apply theories to case studies, and set out innovative research methodologies. The Journal is bilingual (English and French) open-access online academic refereed publication that aims to advance research and understanding of communication and media in Canada and around the globe.

Deadline: March 15th, 2011

Submissions: Papers (5,000 to 7,500 words), review articles of more than one book (2,500 to 3,000 words), and book reviews (1,000 to 1,200 words).

Method: All manuscripts must be submitted electronically as Word Document attachments, directly to Dr. Mahmoud Eid (gmj@uottawa.ca).

Guidelines

Decision: April 30th, 2011

Publication: June 15th, 2011