Walls and bridges

Walls and Bridges: Translatlantic Insights
“We build too many walls and not enough bridges.”
Isaac Newton

Over the course of three 10-day series, in the winter, spring and fall of 2011 in New York City, Walls and Bridges—a program curated by the Villa Gillet (director: Guy Walter) and presented by the Conseil de la Création artistique (general representative: Marin Karmitz)—will present nearly 50 cultural events, combining about 100 speakers and artists, 30 partners and over 20 venues, ranging from the New York Public Library, Joe’s Pub and the Brooklyn Flea to bookstores, universities and various galleries.

• Season 1 : From Thursday, January 27th to Friday, February 4th 2011
• Season 2 : From Tuesday, April 12th to Thursday, April 21st 2011
• Season 3 : From Thursday, October 20th to Sunday, October 30th 2011

Speakers and Artists
Great thinkers from France and across Europe paired with the most important American writers, thinkers and performers.
Friday, January 28
Art/Truth/Lies: The Perils and Pleasures of Deception
1:00pm | Round-table
D. Graham Burnett, Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Jean-Pierre Dupuy, Carrie Lambert-Beatty, Glenn D. Lowry
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
The Magical Side of Celebrity
6:00pm | Round-table
Cécile Guilbert, Laura Kipnis, Wayne Koestenbaum
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
Three Faiths in the Form of a Fugue
8:00pm | Performance / discussion
Salman Ahmad, Reza Aslan, Ala Ebtekar, Dan Fishback, Dan Fishback, Dan Fishback, Fabrice Hadjadj, Alicia Jo Rabins, Shirin Neshat, Damien Poisblaud
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
Saturday, January 29
The End of Privacy: The State and Surveillance
2:30pm | Round-table
Didier Bigo
, Mireille Delmas-Marty, Jeffrey Rosen
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
The New Faces of the Enemy

5:00pm | Round-table
Scott Atran
, Grégoire Chamayou, Ariel Colonomos, Philip Gourevitch
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
And the Pursuit of Happiness

7:30pm | Round-table
Barbara Cassin
, Daniel Handler, Maira Kalman, Sophie Wahnich
The New York Public Library – Celeste Bartos Forum
Sunday, January 30th

From Fiction to Philosophy
1:00pm | Discussion
Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Rick Moody, Avital Ronell, Benjamen Walker
Greenlight Bookstore
Fair for Knowledge: Hair
2:00pm | Fair
Laurel Braitman
, Barbara Cassin, Cécile Guilbert, Justin E. H. Smith, John Strausbaugh, Sophie Wahnich
The Brooklyn Flea
Monday, January 31st

Picturing the Self: A Philosopher Discusses a Photographer’s Work

6:30pm | Discussion
Pierre Cassou-Noguès
, Jen Davis
Aperture Gallery
Going Public: Embodying a Persona

9:00pm | Reading and performance
Cécile Guilbert
, Cynthia Hopkins, Sarah Jones
Joe’s Pub
Tuesday, February 1st

Hunter VS. Hunted: A Philosopher Discusses Short Media Pieces

7:00pm | Screening and discussion
Grégoire Chamayou
, Jamie Hook, Katie Salen
UnionDocs
Wednesday, February 2nd

Catastrophe Practice (1/3)

7:00pm | Round-table
Jean-Pierre Dupuy
, Jonathan Lear, Michel Lussault, Josh Neufeld
The New School – John Tishman Auditorium
Thursday, February 3rd

Starting From Here: Every Place Tells a Story

7:30pm | Discussion
Reif Larsen
, Michel Lussault, Peter Turchi, Philippe Vasset
French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) – Le Skyroom
Friday, February 4th

The Shapes of Space – The Shears of Time: Why Does Philosophy Need Art to Become Truly Experimental?

6:30pm | Round-table
Brody Condon
, Elie During, Patrice Maniglier, McKenzie Wark
The New School – Theresa Lang Center

CAFIC Conference – Call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS
9th CAFIC International Conference: Intercultural Communication Studies in the Context of Globalization: Theory and Practice

China Association for Intercultural Communication (CAFIC), International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS) and Association for Chinese Communication Studies (ACCS) are pleased to announce the forthcoming biennial conference on Intercultural Communication Studies in the Context of Globalization: Theory and Practice. The conference is to be held on June 22-26, 2011 and hosted by the Centre for Intercultural Studies and the College of Foreign Languages, Fujian Normal University (FNU), located in Fuzhou, Fujian, China. High-quality papers for the conference are now invited for submission.

Intercultural communication as an area of study has been around in China since the early 1980s. In a period of thirty years or so since then, we have witnessed remarkable achievements in this field in both theoretical aspects and practical applications. In the context of increasing globalization today, it would be appropriate for the forthcoming conference to focus on ways of linking theory to practice and emphasizing case studies of intercultural communication in various forms.

For further information, please go to Manuscript Submission Guidelines or to Conference Organization.

Paper Submission Requirement: A complete paper in line with Manuscript Submission Guidelines is due by March 1, 2011. Formal invitation letters shall be issued to the authors of accepted papers no later than April 2, 2011.

Working Languages: Papers and speeches are encouraged to be written and delivered in English while those in Chinese are also welcome. All keynote speeches, for their greatest accessibility, should be given in English.

Publication of Accepted Papers: An editorial board will be organized to review all submitted papers and those accepted pieces, with the approval of their authors, will be compiled and published in a volume titled: Intercultural Communication Studies in the Context of Globalization: Theory and Practice–Proceedings of the 9th CAFIC International Conference on Intercultural Communication.

For further information, go to the conference site.

IICD NCA call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

The International and Intercultural Division of the National Communication Association is ready to receive submissions relevant to cultural or intercultural contexts. Three kinds of submissions will be considered: individually submitted competitive papers (individual paper), pre-arranged thematic paper panels (paper session), and roundtable discussion panels (panel discussion) on intercultural topics. The theme for the 2011 conference in New Orleans is Voice (see official NCA Convention call) which emphasizes the National Communication Association as a community of engagement in issues affecting New Orleans and the Gulf Region. In addition to the three kinds of submissions described above, papers and panels which more fully explore and develop the conference theme as this relates to cultural issues are strongly encouraged. The deadline for submission of all materials is Wednesday, March 16th 2011 at 11:59 p.m. PST.

Please indicate whether you want your individual paper submission to be considered as a student paper selection or for the Scholar-to-Scholar sessions. Individual paper submissions should include a 100-word abstract and are limited to 25 pages. Only complete papers will be considered. Individual paper submissions should not contain identifying information (author name, university affiliation). Student papers should be clearly marked to be eligible for top student honors in the division, as well as the Donald P. Cushman Award for top student paper in NCA; to be eligible for either award, all authors must be students. Only one paper per author will be accepted, with one additional co-authored paper permitted for the division; if two sole-authored papers are submitted, the highest ranking will be accepted. The same paper may not be submitted to more than one division. Submissions should be original work, by the authors named, not previously presented at this or other conferences, and not previously published.

All materials must be submitted online through NCA Submission Central. Proposals for short courses, preconferences, seminars, or GIFTS (Great Ideas for Teaching Students) should be submitted directly to program planners for those areas. All submissions must list any A/V requirements. Check your email address listed in NCA Submission Central before or after submission as all correspondence goes there. Deadline: Wednesday, March 16th, 2011 at 11:59 p.m. PST

Contact: Mary Bresnahan, Vice Chair of the IIC Division and division organizer for New Orleans, Department of Communication, Michigan State University, East Lansing. MI 48824-1212, phone 517 432 1285, fax 517 432 1192, email: bresnah1@msu.edu.

Essay contest for Austria

Milton Wolf Seminar 2011 Essay Contest:
Picking up the Pieces: Fragmented Sovereignties and Emerging Information Flows

“The Diplomatic Academy Vienna in partnership with the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania will host a seminar from March 23-25, 2011 in Vienna, Austria, organized by the American Austrian Foundation. The seminar will bring together a diverse group of invited individuals representing multiple perspectives and nationalities.Panelists include distinguished print and television journalists, media development practitioners, diplomats, and academics.

The organizers have launched an essay competition to identify motivated and thoughtful students of international relations, development studies, communication, journalism, law, and related fields who will enrich the seminar proceedings. Essays should be approximately 1500 words long and address the following question: Under what conditions and with what methods should a country or multilateral organization intervene in the media and communications space of another?

Seven winning essay writers will receive a stipend of up to $1,500 each to cover travel to and participation in the 2011 Milton Wolf Seminar in Vienna. Vienna, Austria’s historic capital city provides an ideal location for the seminar because it is also home to a broad array of media actors, multilateral organizations, and international NGOs.”

More information about the seminar and essay contest can be found on the seminar site.

 

Using Poetry to Build Intercultural Dialogue

“Peter Zsoldos, ambassador of the Slovak Republic to Egypt, discussed poetry, translation and its role in the future of intercultural dialogue at the third In Translation lecture this semester, calling for greater intercultural dialogue through creative means. At his lecture titled “Translation, Poetry and Diplomacy: New Horizons for Intercultural Dialogue,” Zsoldos, a diplomat, poet and translator, championed the idea that cultural diplomacy, dialogue and interaction can be used as proactive instruments to develop better and more nuanced relationships with countries in Europe, Asia and Africa. “To understand is to share an interest,” he said. “The aim is to find out what makes others tick.”

Zsoldos has a diplomatic career that spans more than 20 years, the last 10 of which have been spent in the Middle East serving the Slovak Republic’s foreign service in various capacities. In 2000, Zsoldos became the ambassador of the Slovak Republic to the Gulf Cooperation Countries. For the past three years, he has lived in Cairo. As a student, he was interested in literature and religion, and wrote his doctoral thesis about Afro-Cuban religious systems, colloquial Spanish spoken in Cuba and Cuban literature in the 20th century. In the diplomatic corps, Zsoldos asserts that cultural diplomacy should be a tool to counter stereotypes, bias and prejudice.

“There is a saying: take two opposites and connect the dots and you have a line,” Zsoldos noted. “Intercultural dialogue can change long-held positions and attitudes. While changing attitudes is always a work in progress, it is diplomacy and artists that are the first to see and connect these dots.”

Zsoldos is the author of five books that have been translated into different languages, two of which are trilingual books (Arabic, English and Slovak) that he co-authored with renowned Emirati poet and translator Shihab Ghanem. Their first book Pearls and Dates: Poems from the United Arab Emirates won the Best Book of the Year prize at the 2003 International Book Fair in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. Their second book, Contemporary Poems from the Arabian Peninsula, was published in June 2010. The books are a translation of Slovakian poetry into Arabic and vice versa. For Zsoldos, the idea stemmed from a desire to better publicize the great works of Arab poets and authors in the Slovak Republic. “I was looking for something that will bring a new viewpoint to Europe,” he said. “By expanding the body of literature, we are hoping to also expand the greater dialogue.”

Zsoldos has observed that in the post-September 11 era, many works that had not yet been translated from Arabic are now available in Slovak. “Recently, many major Arabic works have been translated into Slovak such as the Quran, the complete One Thousand and One Nights and some of the works of Naguib Mahfouz,” he noted. In the future, Zsoldos wants to continue to build cultural and diplomatic bridges as well as translate the works of Slovak and Arab authors and poets, a pastime he greatly enjoys. “It is a wonderful feeling,” he said. “There is a process of creation that takes hold. I feel as though I am taking off the clothes of the poem, until there is nothingness, and then redressing it in the words of another language.”

Originally published by the American University in Cairo.

Making Dialogue Effective

The Dialogue Society in London is holding a series of panel discussions examining the question of how to make intercultural dialogue work.

“Those working with intercultural and interreligious dialogue at the community or professional level face a range of challenges regarding its effectiveness. We are asked, or ask ourselves, such questions as:

     

  • Does what we do make or contribute to a tangible difference to society in any way?
  • Does our work, whether directly or otherwise, reach beyond the sympathetic to those whose attitudes and behaviour are an actual threat to peace and social cohesion?
  • Are the relationships that our work initiates across cultural or religious boundaries of a meaningful and lasting kind?
  • Is our work part of something broader that is capable of effecting change on a grand scale?
  •  

This series is intended to occasion focused and constructive discussion of such questions among a range of people concerned with relationships between different cultural, religious or social groups, in their professional lives or at the community level.

Findings and conclusions will be published. It is hoped that the series will be replicated at three independent UK branches of the Dialogue Society, allowing us to draw on a wider range of perspectives in collating findings.

Objectives

  • To encourage interprofessional dialogue, interaction and cooperation between people working on intercultural/ interreligious dialogue, peace and social cohesion.
  • To foster dialogue between people engaged with dialogue at the personal or community level, and those concerned with the same questions in a professional capacity.
  • To explore and clarify the questions of what effectiveness in dialogue is, and whether and how it can be measured.
  • To find a range of creative and practical answers to the question of how dialogue can be made effective by

       

    • identifying and promoting current best practice and
    • identifying and promoting promising future possibilities.
    • To share these answers among all participants of the series and more widely.”
    •  

  • Originally posted on the Dialogue Society website; see further information there.

     

    Dialogue award for Eco Peace

    “ECOPEACE Friends of the Earth Middle East, an organisation jointly established by environmentalists from Palestine, Jordan and Israel and member of Friends of the Earth International, will on Friday 3 December receive the 2010 Anna Lindh Foundation Euro-Mediterranean Dialogue Award, at a ceremony to be held in Brussels.

    Taking place this year on the theme of ‘Intercultural Dialogue for Ecological Sustainability’, the Dialogue Award is unique in the fact that it is bestowed and voted upon by members of the Anna Lindh Foundation’s region-wide Network of 3,000 civil society organisations working across the 43 countries of the Union for the Mediterranean.

    The ceremony will be followed by a debate on the theme “Can Intercultural Dialogue Prepare Social Change to Address the Ecological Challenge.”

    ECOPEACE Friends of the Earth Middle East is a civil society organization, conducting trans-boundary research projects and promoting cross border dialogue for ecological sustainability in the region, a fair share of natural resources of the Jordan Valley, and a just peace.”

    For further details, see the original announcement on the European Neighborhood and Partnership Instrument [ENPI] site.

    Book of Travels

    “In partnership with the British Council Maslaha has built an online exhibition about the constant mix of conversations that have occurred between Islamic people, cultures, societies and Europe. Maslaha is a new web-based organisation closely linked to the Young Foundation in London which aims to provide a greater understanding of Islam and its practices for Muslims and non-Muslims alike. In mid-June 2010, the online version has been launched at www.thebookoftravels.org.

    To make things even more interesting, Maslaha also built a physical exhibition which was on display in mid-May 2010 at Bethnal Green Library in East London.

    The theme of this exhibition is travel – both of individuals and also ideas across time and geographical boundaries. In particular, the project focuses on a 17th century Turkish traveller, Evliya Çelebi, who wrote extensively of his travels to Europe and North Africa in his book, Seyahatnâme: Book of Travels. This exhibition aims to capture the sense of curiousity that drives exploration, and the human desire to investigate and learn more about different cultures and experiences.

    Read Book of Travels: How the Ottomans shaped London, Raheel Mohammed’s introduction to the exhibition at the BBC London website.”

    For more information, go to the British Council’s description of the project.

    Literature Seminar

    “The “Our Shared Europe” literature seminar is the British Council’s first event specifically aimed at exploring Muslim European interaction through contemporary literature, as part of the wider project of the same name. Adopting the well-established concept and format of the “Walberberg Seminar on Contemporary Literature from the UK”, colleagues from the British Council Berlin office have organised this exciting three-days seminar entitled “Faultlines, Fictions and Futures”. Chaired by writer Ahdaf Soueif and gathering writers Inaam Kachachi, Jamal Mahjoub and Robin Yassin-Kassab, the seminar will explore the writers’ work, their people, their times and their hometowns, and give the opportunity to a wide range of participants coming from the UK, Germany, Malta, the Netherlands, Serbia, Slovenia, Portugal, Turkey, France, Greece and Belgium, to interact and share ideas.”

    For details and interviews with these authors, held Nov 12-14, 2010 in Berlin, see the original blog.

    International Opportunities: NCA mini-conference

    “International Opportunities for Scholars in Communication and Related Disciplines”

    Report of a mini-conference held as part of the
    National Communication Association Conference,
    November 2010, San Francisco, United States

    Report prepared by Grant Hannis
    Convenor and chair of the mini-conference
    (g.d.hannis@massey.ac.nz)

    “Over recent years, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of universities outside the US offering Communication and Journalism courses. This growth has taken place, for instance, in the Middle East, South East Asia, Australia, New Zealand, South America and Canada. Such internationalization presents opportunities for US Communication scholars to seek funding to teach and conduct research in other countries and for foreign Communication scholars to do likewise in the US.

    A mini-conference on this topic was held on November 14-16, 2010, as part of the National Communication Association conference in San Francisco. The mini-conference invited contributions from scholars who had worked in foreign countries—including the benefits they derived from the experience, any pitfalls to avoid, and what advice they would offer others. The mini-conference also invited contributions from those who fund such travel.

    The mini-conference was convened by Grant Hannis, the head of journalism as Massey University in Wellington, New Zealand. Dr Hannis spent the second half of 2010 as a Fulbright Senior Scholar, teaching and conducting research at San Francisco State University.

    Six presenters spoke at the mini-conference and answered questions from the floor. This report summarizes the presentations, incorporating the presenters’ responses to questions. All the presenters are happy to be contacted, should you have further questions.”

    Report of the NCA Mini-conference

    A slideshow with photos of the 6 presenters follows.

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