Euro-Med Seminar ICD

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

We are pleased to announce the Euro-Mediterranean seminar “Indicators for Intercultural Dialogue in Non-formal Education Activities”, organised in the framework of the partnership between the Council of Europe and the European Commission in the field of youth from 22-24 September 2011 in Mollina, Spain, during the 12th University on Youth and Development.

The participants of the seminar will be youth workers, trainers in non-formal education, educational experts and researchers, stakeholders, and youth policy experts from the Euro-Mediterranean region. All participants should:
Be interested and experienced in the topics of intercultural dialogue;
Be familiar with the intercultural dialogue aspects in non-formal education activities;
Be ready to contribute to the programme and reflections of the seminar;
Be able to work in English;
Be interested in the University on Youth and Development;
Be available for the full duration of the seminar.
Priority will be given to the participants/practitioners interested in contributing to the testing and evaluation phase of the project.

The detailed presentation of the project and of the seminar, as well as the application procedure can be found in Presentation call for pax seminar ICD indicators Sept 2011. Please note that the application form should be submitted on-line by 18 July 2011.

Viktoria Karpatska
Partnership between the Council of Europe and the European Commission in the field of youth
c/o: Council of Europe – Directorate of Youth and Sport
European Youth Centre Budapest
H-1024 Budapest, Zivatar u. 1-3. HUNGARY
E-mail: viktoria.karpatska@coe.int; Fax: +36 1 212 4076
http://youth-partnership-eu.coe.int | http://www.eycb.coe.int

See original post for further information.

Music Tourism and Travel

CALL FOR PAPERS

Soundtracks: Music, Tourism and Travel
Liverpool, United Kingdom
6-9 July 2012

As an expression of culture, a form of intangible heritage, a signifier of place, and a marker of moments, music provides an important and emotive narrative for tourists. Indeed, it is increasingly difficult to imagine tourism ‘in silence’, outside of the scores and songs which accompany and punctuate journeys. From touristic performances of traditional dance, pilgrimages to the homes and graves of composers and singers, impromptu street entertainments, tours to concerts, attending festivals, to the sounds of the car radio, the travelling with ipods and the ‘muzak’ of hotel lifts, music can both activate and shape the journey, and passively permeate its duration. Music can both define and transcend the borders of destinations, emphasise and challenge notions of tradition, provide opportunities for liminal play, transgression and resistance and, help define the identities of visitors and the visited.

In this, the CTCC’s 6th international research conference, and in the City of Liverpool famed for its popular music, we seek to explore the relationships between tourism, tourists and all forms/genres and sub-genres of music including: popular, classical, folk, dance, rock, jazz and hip-hop, across all cultures and continents. In the context of new and old global mobilities, we are interested in musical pilgrimage, the material and social flows of travellers and musicians, the cultural and economic policies that promote music tourism, festivals and performances for tourists, ethnographies of touristic encounters with music, the place of music in the representation of tourism destinations and, the role of music in the construction of tourist discourses, narratives and memories. As in previous events, the conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and epistemologies and thus we welcome papers from the widest range of disciplines and fields including: anthropology, cultural geography, cultural studies, ethnology and folklore, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, musicology and ethnomusicology, philosophy, political sciences, sociology, subaltern studies, tourism studies and urban/spatial planning.

We welcome innovative perspectives on all aspects of music and tourism. Key themes of interest to the conference include:
Musical memory – the role of music in narratives of touristic experience
Fans, pilgrimage and performances – motivations, behaviours and meanings
The tourist’s involvement in preserving and creating musical traditions
Managing tourists at musical sites
Musical imaginaries – representing places, peoples and pasts in music
Dance tourism and embodied practices
Designing ambience – mobilising music in touristic spaces
Music festivals as opportunities for tourist encounters
Inspirations – travelling musicians
Music as intangible heritage – touring through traditions
Challenging musical traditions – tourist ‘noise’
Please submit a 300 word abstract including title and full contact details as an electronic file to ctcc@leedsmet.ac.uk. You may submit your abstract as soon as possible but no later than November 21st 2011.

For further details on the conference please contact us at Email ctcc@leedsmet.ac.uk or Tel. +44 (0) 113 812 8541.

Public Mission of Social Sciences/Humanities

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Public Mission of the Social Sciences and Humanities: Transformation and Renewal

Transatlantic Conference with Jutta Allmendinger, Lisa Anderson, Thomas Bender, Michael Burawoy, Craig Calhoun, Klaus Eder, Rogers Smith, Wolfgang Streeck, Jacques Revel, Stephen Walt, and others. Leading scholars from both sides of the Atlantic who have studied the history of their disciplines will analyze the historical transformation of the public role of their professions comparatively and critically.

Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB), Berlin, Germany, September 16-17, 2011
To follow from a distance (conference-related conversations, content and outcomes), you can sign up for the newsletter [http://bit.ly/l0orVo] or follow updates on Twitter: http://twitter.com/PublicSphereHub
* Conference registration (free, but RSVP required): http://bit.ly/lILnic
* Conference outline and preliminary program: http://bit.ly/jIv0tP
* Companion to the conference (research resources): http://bit.ly/hDwOhe
* Practical information for attending the conference, including tips for hotels in the area and cheap accommodation for students: http://bit.ly/m2Uvqc
Inquiries: for questions about the Berlin conference, please contact our European partners at publicmission@wzb.eu
The transatlantic conference is inspired by and builds on the SSRC’s Academia & the Public Sphere Essay Series: http://bit.ly/fVf5Ux
Sponsored by the Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB), The Young Academy at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences (BGSS) at Humboldt University, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the Institute for Public Knowledge (IPK) at New York University.
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The SSRC’s Public Sphere Hub [http://publicsphere.ssrc.org/], an Open Educational Resource and Research Hub on the public sphere, is co-sponsored by New York University’s Institute for Public Knowledge (IPK). Newsletter: http://bit.ly/l0orVo – Twitter: http://twitter.com/PublicSphereHub

HUC 2011 CFP

HUC 2011: Storytelling, Memories and Identity Constructions
Mexico: 4 – 9 November 2011

Deadline for paper proposal submissions: 15 July, 2011 (Deadline has been extended for all sessions and sub-conferences)
Conference Languages: English, Castilian, German, French and Nahuatl
Languages for presentation: English, Castilian.

The primary focus for the 7th edition of this inclusive and interdisciplinary annual conference organized by Enkidu Magazine and the International Society for Cultural History and Cultural Studies (CHiCS) in Mexico City with the support of the National Human Rights Commission of Mexico, is to interrogate storytelling, memories and identity constructions from a wide range of perspectives, and in their manifold cultural and social manifestations. We welcome submissions from all branches of the social sciences, humanities, as well as the arts. Interpretations of the conference themes ranging from the predictable to the surprising are encouraged.

Among the themes of interest are the following: – Cultural texts – Narrative and Linguistics – Linguistic borders and translation – Narrative and Myth – Storytelling in rituals, customs, and fetishism. – Storytelling and Visual/Performing Arts and Music – Oral Tradition and Contemporary Chronicle – Postmodernity and its narratives – Voice and reflexivity in oral and written texts – Colonial and Postcolonial Narratives – Conquest and Political Memory – Globalization and indigenous cultures – Migrations and Diasporas – Story, Dialogue and Discourse – Memory and truth-telling – Testimonial Narratives – Memory and Written Record – Imaginary Homelands – Displacement Heritage – Global Spaces and Cultural Memories – Text, Context and Intertext in Storytelling and Performance – Children’s Stories- Language, Authority and Silence

Interdisciplinary perspectives are especially welcome since all these topics in themselves stretch across several disciplines: history, literary studies, linguistics, psychology, political sciences, educational sciences, ethnology, queer studies, anthropology, sociology… Graduate students are encouraged to participate.

The conference has developed into a unique international academic forum for interpretative approaches in the humanities and social sciences. The conference has traditionally also been a forum for discussing creative historical and political memory, remembering and forgetting of the past, as well as translations between cultures and re-negotiations and re-constructions of cultural identities in one one way or another. The conference is organised into a large number of thematic sessions and sub-conferences addressing a highly diverse series of themes. The conference has an exceptional multilingual and multi-cultural approach, typically bringing together participants from all over the world to share and exchange their research, experiences and ideas in a truly multicultural, multilingual and interdisciplinary academic environment. The conference sessions are conducted in Castillian and English. Occasionally, the conference also has sessions conducted in German and French. Some sessions will be bilingual and conducted in both languages with interpreters (on request). Other sessions will be conducted in one of the two conference languages, and the session moderator will give summaries of the paper in the other language. Many sessions are being conducted with interpreters for sign language (on request). Papers are welcomed on virtually all related topics and themes, independently of time period and space. Also papers of comparative phenomena will be considered. Interdisciplinary perspectives are encouraged.

The conference aims at bringing together academics working in all relevant disciplines as well as activists, artists and other professionals, and promoting innovative multidisciplinary and multicultural exchange and dialogue. CHICS’ academic conferences are characterized by traditional paper presentations in panel sessions with three speakers each, followed by lively exchange, dialogue and interaction between speakers and audience in many small groups, workshops and seminars rather than by formal plenary sessions. Our conferences provide a forum for diverse voices from all over the world, to come together and make connections across linguistic, cultural and academic barriers.

* Paper and panel proposals
The conference languages for presentation will be English and Castilian. 500 word abstracts should be submitted to the organising committee in English, Castilian, German or French. Final papers should be of approximately 20 – 30 minutes duration (circa 8 – 10 pages). Other forms of presentation, for instance workshops, panel debates and poster sessions will be considered on request.

* Proposals for individual papers
Abstracts are to be submitted along with the presenter’s name, short bio, address, telephone, email, and institutional affiliation. It is recommended to use this form when submitting a paper proposal. However, abstracts will also be accepted as e-mail attachments. All correspondence for this conference will be conducted via email. You will be notified by 15. July whether your proposal has been accepted or rejected.

* Proposals for panel sessions
Typically, a panel of academic papers should include 3 (maximum 4) speakers and 1 moderator (session chair). Each session will last for 2 hours allowing for 30 minutes for each speaker and a further 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposers should submit: (1) Session title and a session intro (ca 100 words), (2) Paper titles, (3) Abstracts for each paper (500 words), (4) Short biography for each participant and the panel chair (ca 100-150 words), (5) Institutional affiliation and address for each participant, (6) Audio-visual and other technical requirements. If you would like to propose a panel session, and want assistance in finding speakers and/or a session chair, we can publish a call for papers for your panel session on the conference web site and distribute it in our newsletter. If you have an idea for a thematic panel session and would like us to publish a call for papers on the conference website, please send us a proposal by e-mail. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted within few days. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to resend your abstract and resubmit your registration form, and if possible, suggest an alternative e-mail address. In particular delegates using hotmail or yahoo accounts to receive conference related e-mails often experience problems receiving conference information by e-mail. E-mails from the conference organisers are often delivered to your spam folder and not to your inbox, unless you remember to add the following e-mail addresses: huc@enkidumagazine.com and liowlb@enkidumagazine.com to your safe-list. The first address is the general e-mail address of the conference and will be used to send conference newsletters and general information. The second, is the e-mail address of the academic coordinator of the conference and will be used for individual communication with delegates.

* EXHIBITORS, PUBLISHERS AND ARTISTS:
Artists are welcome to suggest exhibitions and displays of art during the conference. Organisations, universities and publishers are welcome to sign up for information stands at the conference center. Commercial exhibitors pay a modest daily fee. The following information is required by artists, publishers and other exhibitors during the conference: 1) Technical Description of the information stand or artwork with indications of technical requirements for their presentation, the size and extension of the individual artworks to be presented. 2) Estimated Insurance value of the artworks 3) One image of a representative sample of artistic work from the exhibitions can be sent by e-mail to the conference organizers in the format tiff or jpg. 4) Curriculum Vitae of artist (or organisation). 5) Description of Exhibition (300 – 500 words). 6) Short bio of artist (or organisation).

* CULTURAL AND SOCIAL PRE-CONFERENCE ACTIVITIES
The academic sessions with formal paper presentations will take place between 4 November and 9. November 2011. Before the conference, we will organise a number of cultural and social activities for conference delegates and we hope that many international delegates will consider arriving in Mexico City some days before the conference and participate in these activities. In addition conference delegates with name badges will be given discounts and sometimes free access to various theatre plays, concerts, film screenings and other events before and during the conference. The final program for the cultural and social pre-conference activities will be published on the conference web site and will be announced also in the conference newsletter, which will be distributed by e-mail in the months before the conference.

* Disabled Participants
We are pleased to announce that printed conference materials that will be distributed during the conference, also will be available in large print or Braille on request. If you require sign language interpretation during your session, or you would like to distribute handouts or other materials in Braille during your presentation, please indicate this in the registration form. Participants with disabilities are recommended to indicate this in the form if they require any special support or assistance during the event or during social and cultural activities before or during the conference.

* REGISTRATION FEE for “Storytelling, Memories and Identity Constructions”:
Waged delegates (speakers): 200 USD
Students and unwaged delegates (speakers): 150 USD
Payment received via PayPal or bank transfer in advance (Payments completed before 15 July. A suplement of 50 USD applies after this day and for payments on location). We recommend everyone to arrange their payment of the registration fee before the conference. On location, we have no possibility to process credit cards, nor issue official receipts and the registration desk will generally be staffed with volunteer students who are not entitled to receive payments in cash. If you for any reason prefer to pay on location in Mexico, please inform the organizers in advance, and we will find a solution for you. Enkidu and the participating organisations will not be able to provide travel support for conference delegates. It is therefore strongly recommended to apply for a scholarship or a grant from other sources. Delegates from non-OECD countries and students and unwaged delegates from any country who do not receive financial support to attend the conference, can apply for a reduced registration fee. A selection of papers will be considered for publication in an edited collection. Enquiries about the conference should be sent via email.

Centro Cultural Enkidu
Calle Ezequiel Montes #37, int. 2
Colonia Tabacalera 06030
Mexico D.F.

Globalization conference 2012

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Communicating in a World of Norms: Information and Communication in Contemporary Globalization
Lille, France, March 7-9, 2012

Lille is located in Northern France and it takes 50 minutes by train to get to this beautiful city from the Charles de Gaulle airport (CDG), one of the two main Paris airports. For more information about Lille, please visit http://www.mairie-lille.fr/en

We hope that you will be interested in participating in this international event, which is co-sponsored by ICA [International Communication Association], the GERIICO [Group of studies and research on information and communication] and the SFSIC [French Society for Information and Communication Sciences]. It is the first time that ICA is sponsoring such an event in France, which will help us develop stronger scientific relationships between communication scholars all around the world.

The deadline to submit your 1,000 word abstract is September 30, 2011.

The proposals must without fail be submitted in French or in English. The main conference site is in French. Information about the conference is English is available here.

The authors will get an answer at the beginning of December 2011. Please see the attached APPEL A COMMUNICATIONS CMN (US) for more details.

Looking forward to seeing you there!
François Cooren, PhD
Past president (2010-2011)
International Communication Association

Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS
7th Annual Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference
THE POLITICS, PRACTICES, AND POETICS OF THE ARCHIVE
SINGAPORE
19 – 22 JUNE, 2012

Eight years since the first Annual Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference which heralded the resurgence of cinematic new waves in the region, we turn our eyes to the state of film archiving and the relationship between cinema and the archives. Filipino film critic Alexis Tioseco’s 2009 open letter to the Film Development Council of the Philippines mentions current holdings stored in ‘deplorable conditions’. In his letter, Tioseco praises the National Film Archive of Thailand for its work in doing so much with so little. In Indonesia, the Sinematek Indonesia which was established in the early 1970s has also seen cuts that make the archive a shadow of its former glory. It is only in Singapore that a young Asian Film Archive (est. 2005) has taken root.

The 7th Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference (2012) emphasizes the politics, practices, and poetics of the archive. How does one define an archive? And who can be said to do archival work? Might DVD pirates, private collectors, cinephiles, film bloggers and film societies be considered film archivists of a sort when governments do not or no longer perceive the need to fund national film archives? If so, how does this change the public nature of an archive, and what implications does it have on the production of knowledge? What might film curators take into consideration when they select and preserve films for the archive? What are the social, political, aesthetic, and scholarly roles of the archive? How does the archive negotiate issues of power and accessibility?  What is the role of the archive in the digital age of new media?

At the same time, in interrogating the relationship between film and the archive, might film itself as a socio-cultural text not be regarded as an archive and as a necessary site to re-think temporalities and the reasons for nostalgia? As Derrida reminds us, “The question of the archive is not a question of the past” but rather “a question of the future itself.” Where does the archive lie in creating, defining, and constructing cultural memory or cultural heritage? This conference then invites papers that comment not only on the nature of what an archive is and the role it plays in South East Asia, but also how films and film archives ask us to think about the timeliness of cultural work.

Each year, the conference has included film practitioners in recognition of the crucial role they have played in increasing film education and discourse in the region. We have previously provided space for independent filmmakers and screenings of their works, focused on curriculum development, and highlighting alternative cultures of cinema. This year, the conference seeks to include workshops that bring together film archivists from within the region.

We invite panels that address this theme, particularly questions concerning:
*       Film Archival Materials as Intertexts
*       Comparative Studies of Archives or Case Studies of Specific Archives
*       Role of the Academic / Film Critic / Filmmaker in Relation to the Archive
*       Technology / New Media
*       Production of Temporalities and Spatialities
*       Politics of Taste
*       Preservation and Dissemination
*       Archival Research Methods
*       Intellectual Property
*       The Relationship between Southeast Asian Archives and the International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF)
*       Historiography
*       Scholarly Accessibility
*       Subtitling and the Archive
*       Film Policy and the Archive
*       The State and the Archive
*       Short Films and the Archive

We also welcome submissions for the open call. Please check our website archives and conference programs for past paper topics as we are less likely to accept topics that have been covered before:
http://seaconference.wordpress.com/conference-program/

Abstract Submission Deadline: Nov 30, 2011 Please send an abstract (max. 500 words) and short bio (max. 100
words) to: Sophia Siddique Harvey (soharvey@vassar.edu), Khoo Gaik Cheng (gaik.khoo@gmail.com) and Jasmine Nadua Trice (jntrice@gmail.com). We are currently attempting to get funding for travel subsidies and accommodations but cannot offer any as of yet.

Border crossings conference

International Interdisciplinary Conference
Border crossings: bridging disciplines and research agendas

10 June 2011, 9:00 – 18:30
Aix-Marseille Institute for Advanced Studies (IMéRA), Salle de conférence de la Maison des Astronomes, Marseille, France

KEYNOTE ADDRESS (6pm)
Michèle Lamont, Harvard University
“Boundaries, recognition, social resilience, and other keys to successful societies”

“Over the past two decades, a gap has developed in the field of border crossing studies between scholars studying the building of walls and those caring about bonding and bridging, the division of labor sometimes reflecting disciplinary boundaries, with sociologists and anthropologists and social theorists enthused by “transnational practices” and legal scholars, political scientists and political philosophers worried about securitization and control before and at the border. There are signs that scholars interested in border control policies and those interested in flows across borders could not durably ignore one another. In France, there has been some recent work by anthropologists interested in borders and mobility (eg the French National Funding Agency Frontières project). In the US, after ignoring or deprecating policies, there has been an evolution and more emphasis has been put on the implementation of policies and local policy practices that affect migrants’ experience, strategies or quality of life (eg Light 2006).

It is time to study exactly how bordering, rebordering, bridging and bonding interact. What are the national and local policies that affect migrant practices? How have border control policies affected migrants’ social strategies, economic achievements and cultural practices? How do non-state actors and organizations assist migrants in bridging the ‘here’ and ‘there’ despite new forms of border enforcement?  How do efforts of internal rebordering and differentiation between members ‘of’ and persons ‘in’ the polity affect post-migration experiences and the emergence of bonding in the long term? How do the changing strategies of sending states vis-à-vis emigrants and the governments of their host countries influence the dynamics of bridging and bonding?  How do these effects vary depending on the life cycle of the individual and the family, the type of legal status and the forms of ethnicization and racialization migrants endure?

Answering these questions is challenging from a theoretical, analytical and methodological perspective.

Theoretically, a fruitful dialogue could emerge between scholars interested in cultural and social boundaries, those working on legal/state borders and their legitimacy, and those concerned by “transnational citizenship” (Bauböck 1994).

Analytically, we need to identify policies that may affect migrant flows in the home and destination countries and the type of life experiences affected by policy or legal frameworks. This should allow us to devise an analytical framework to understand the variety of policy/practices matrices and the factors that explain variation. In this way, we could empirically study whether and under which circumstances migrants take into account, ignore or circumvent policies.

Research design will also be a challenge. One needs to take into account the interaction of different levels of analysis. Individual decisions to migrate are often helped by meso-level organizations and infrastructures and take place within regional migration systems, yet they also depend partly on macro trends, and the structure of the “globalized” economy cannot be ignored. Once arrived, migrants’ experience may vary from one city or state to another depending on the enforcement of national or federal policies. Data collection is also an issue.  Large-scale surveys are typically produced within national boundaries and issued by national public authorities. This “methodological nationalism” is compounded by the relative lack of data in countries of emigration. While qualitative studies do not face this problem, they face others such as sample selection of interviewed migrants, and access to informants involved in intergovernmental negotiations.

This one day conference will bring together scholars from different disciplines that study border crossings and bridgings to discuss these theoretical, analytical and empirical challenges and open new research agendas.”

For further details, see the original post.

International Association for Dialogue Analysis report

The 13th conference of the International Association for Dialogue Analysis (IADA), which took place in Montreal, Canada, from April 26-30, 2011,  was a big success with some 26 countries represented and close to 110 participants from around the world. The theme of the conference was “Dialogue and Representation,” which allowed participants to address what dialogue studies have to say about the question of representation, whether we speak in terms of political, artistic, cognitive or methodological forms of representation. Six keynote speakers were invited to participate in this event: in alphabetic order, Éric Grillo (Sorbonne Nouvelle, France), Cornelia Ilie (U. of Malmö, Sweden), Alain Létourneau (U de Sherbrooke, Canada), Wolfgang Teubert (U of Birmingham, UK), Karen Tracy (U of Colorado, Boulder, USA), and Edda Weigand (U. of Münster, Germany). A volume, published in the series Dialogue Studies at John Benjamins, will be soon edited by François Cooren and Alain Létourneau. This book will include some of the best contributions to this international conference. A special issue of the new journal Language and Dialogue will also include some key contributions to this event. The proceedings will also be soon available on the IADA website.

François Cooren
IADA secretary and co-organizer of the conference

World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue – Report

On April 7-9, 2011, the World Forum on Intercultural Dialogue was held in Baku, Azerbaijan. I gave a presentation entitled: “Dialogue about Dialogue: Taking a (Meta)Communication Perspective on the Role of Women in Intercultural Dialogue.” All presentations will be posted to the Forum site in the near future, and published in a proceedings volume.

The World Forum was supported by the UN Alliance of Civilizations, UNESCO, Council of Europe, North-South Center of the Council of Europe, ISESCO and Euronews. Building on several prior events, the Forum highlighted intercultural dialogue as one of the most pressing challenges that the global community faces today. The forum addressed conceptual, governmental, policy and practical aspects of intercultural dialogue, providing an opportunity for sharing good practices and making new connections. In addition, since the event was hosted by the President of Azerbaijan, we were all treated as guests of the state, and went everywhere with a security escort. Highlights were the formal entertainment and elaborate banquets on both Thursday and Friday evenings. Upon our arrival, we were given not only the usual conference program, small notebook and briefcase labeled with the conference information, but also dozens of brochures and a guidebook about Azerbaijan. When we returned from closing ceremonies, a gift package was waiting, with a small handmade carpet and hand-painted silk scarf (local craft specialties), a mug and local tea, as well as a bronze plaque noting our participation. In fact, there were so many presents that I mailed them back to the US rather than carry them around with me for the next several months.

The Forum was opened by the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, His Excellency Mr. IIham Aliyev. The plenary panel on which I participated was “Women as Key Agents of Intercultural Dialogue.” This panel was co-chaired by Dr. Katérina Stenou (Director, Cultural Policy and Intercultural Dialogue, UNESCO, and member of this Center’s Advisory Board) and the First Lady of Azerbaijan, Ms. Mehriban Aliyeva (she is also President of the Heydar Aliyev Foundation, and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador). Rapporteur for the panel was Ms. Pramila Patten (CEDAW expert). The other panelists were: Ms. Hijran Huseynova (Chairperson of the State Committee on Family, Women and Children Affairs, Azerbaijan); Ms. S.Y.Orlova (Deputy chair of Council of Parliament of Russian Federation), Ms. Rachida Dati (Mayor of the 7th arrondissement of Paris), Ms. Concepcion Olavarrieta (Chair of the Mexican Node of  the Millennium Project), Ms. Mbarka Bouaida (Member of Parliament, Morocco), and Mr. Alexander Ageev, (General Director of Institute of Economic Strategies, Department of Humanitarian Sciences, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation). Respondents to the panel included several ministers of culture, as well as Dr. Ruth Halperin-Kaddari (Director, The Ruth and Emanuel Rackman Center for the Advancement of Women’s Status, Bar-Ilan University, Israel), Dr. Bibi Bakare-Yusuf (publisher of Casava Republic Press, based in Abuja, Nigeria), and Ms. Natalia Molebatsi (performance poet and storyteller, based in South Africa).

The majority of the Forum’s participants were ministers of culture or other politicians (and I did meet a few, including Ms. Irina Cajal-Marin, Under Secretary of State for the Ministry of Culture in Romania, and Mr. Ali Elamin, Director of the Minister’s Office for Sudan). Others were CEOs of NGOs or non-profits (and among those I met were Ms. Wajiha Haris, President of Scheherazade, in Bucharest, Romania, Dr. Catherine Fieschi, Director of Counterpoint, just separated from the British Council, in London, Ms. Lila de Chaves, President of Heritage & Museums, in Athens, and Mr. Peter Gorgievski, CEO of Global Dialogue Foundation in Moonee Ponds, Australia). There were also a number of people connected to one of the international organizations co-sponsoring the event (I met several, including Mr. Hans d’Orville, Assistant Director-General for Strategic Planning of UNESCO in Paris, Dr. Liubava Moreva, Program Specialist for Culture in UNESCO’s Moscow office, and Ms. Neslihan Demirkol Sonmez, representing the Turkish National Commission for UNESCO; as well as Dr. Mir Asghar Husain, of the North-South Centre Think Tank for the Council of Europe). There were even a few other faculty present (I met Dr. Darla K. Deardorff, Executive Director of the Association  of International Education Administrators, based at Duke University in the US). And these are only some of those with whom I exchanged business cards – I am looking forward to continuing conversations with dozens of people as a result of the event.

Two other events occurred simultaneously with the Forum, an academic conference (“Traditions and prospects for intercultural dialogue in CIS countries: culture, education and communication”), as well as the first convention of the Global Youth Movement for the Alliance of Civilizations, and so I met some individuals from each of those events. For example, Ms. Emilia Katosang (Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Palau to the UN) and Ivaylo Stoimenov (a Bulgarian journalist) were both part of the GYM meeting; Prof. Samir Sleiman (cultural anthropologist in Lebanon, and Editor in Chief of Le Debat) presented at the academic conference. I also met several of the many international journalists covering the event, including Mr. Mohammad Malick, of The News, in Pakistan, and Mr. Ghassan Ali Osman, covering the event for Sudan. And, like most of the presenters, I was interviewed for Azerbaijani television. The audience was so large (600-1000, depending on whether participants of the 3 events overlapped at the same event or not), that two screens were used to ensure everyone could view the speakers. Look for images of Katérina Stenou on screen, and then being interviewed in the gallery included below.

Ms. Samaya Mammodova and Ms. Chinara Shakarova, two English majors studying in Baku, were assigned to help the dozen participants from the USA. Since I had a few hours free Saturday morning, after the conference concluded but before leaving for the airport, they took me on a personal tour of Icheri Shekhar (the old city in Baku). A few photos are below, for those who have not yet been to Baku themselves, along with photos of the conference.

My thanks to Katérina Stenou for my invitation to participate in this fascinating event. And thanks to Neslihan Demirkol Sonmez for 2 of the photos included below (the one of the dinner celebration, and 4 of us talking).

Euronews video coverage of the event is now available online. (I’m included, but as part of a conversational grouping, so look carefully!)

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Director, Center for Intercultural Dialogue

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VII Mini Communication Conference of the Americas

CALL FOR PAPER/PANEL PRESENTATIONS

FELAFACS (Federacion Latinoamericana de Facultades de Comunicacion Social)
“Voices from the field about the Education of Communication Professional in the Americas”
“Voces desde el campo sobre la Formación de Profesionales de la Comunicacion en las Américas”
Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2011
New Orleans, USA.
The deadline for submissions is April 25, 2011
In conjunction with the 2011 NCA Annual Convention “Voice” November 17-20, 2011, New Orleans, USA.

Introduction: The National Communication Association (NCA) and La Fedaración Latinoamericana de Facultades de Comunicación (FELAFACS) continue their ongoing relationship which started in 1997 with the First Communication Conference of the Americas, held in the City of Mexico. The goal of this agreement is to establish a long-term partnership to promote dialogue among communication scholars throughout the Americas, to share their perspectives on communication research, teaching and practice, and to encourage new avenues for collaboration.

In the spirit of this understanding, the VII Mini-Communication Conference of the Americas to be held in New Orleans on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2011. The conference will take place in conjunction with the 2011 NCA Annual Convention. This one-day conference will allow communication scholars from Latin America, the United States, Canada, and Spain to voice their perspectives and experiences in field of communication on the topics selected for the conference.

Steering Committee: Dra. Vanesa del Carmen Muriel Amezcua, Professor, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, México. Elena Hurtado, Consultora y Profesora, Universidad Privada de Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Mariela Pérez Chavarría, Professor at ITESM, Campus Monterrey, México; Dr. Jesús Arroyave, Professor at Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia; Dr. Federico Varona, Professor at San José State University, San José, California (Coordinator). The members of this Committee are coordinating the planning of this conference with Brad Mello, NCA representative (Washington, D.C., USA) and Solón Calero, FELAFACS representative (Cali, Colombia).

Requirements: Those interested in presenting on one of the competitive panels outline below (panels1, 2 and 3) should submit a 2 to 3-page abstract (summary) proposal of the topic to be presented. The deadline for submissions is April 25, 2011. The authors of the accepted proposals will be asked to send up to a 15-page paper on the topic a week before the conference in November. Papers will be presented in a panel format and each panelist will have 10 minutes to present. The papers will be published on the FELAFACS website. Residents in USA and Canada should send their proposals/final papers to: Federico Varona, San José State University (fvarona@sjsu.edu). Residents in Latin-American and Spain should send their proposals/final papers to: Jesús Arroyave, Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Colombia (jarroyav@uninorte.edu.co)

Conference Agenda and Timetable

Panel 1:. How we do research (Methods for Collecting and Analyzing data) (Listen to voices from the professional field): communication institutions (organizations), communication professional, audiences, etc. The proposals for this panel should address any of the following topics:
• International Research on the “Methods used to research the Communication needs of communication professionals in today’s market place in the Americas”.
• Experiences of research conducted to listen to voices from the professional field
• Case studies
• Papers
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

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Panel 2: Research results on communication needs of communication professionals in the market place today in the Americas”. Lessons Learned from voices from the field. The proposals for this workshop may address the following topics:
• International Research results on the “Communication needs of communication professionals in today’s market place in the Americas”.
• Experiences of research conducted to listen to voices from the professional field
• Case studies
• Papers
Time: 10 45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
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Lunch: 12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Panel 3: How do we integrate research results in our teaching in our universities? New contents, new methods, et. What kind of impact those voices have had in what we teach and how we teach? What kind of impact those voices have had in the core curriculum of our communication programs? What are the new teaching-learning environments? What are the new contents of our teaching, ie: The new social networks. The proposals for this panel should address any of the following topics:
• Experiences of collaborative teaching in communication,
• International research projects taking place in the Americas,
• International experiences where internships programs are implemented to help students achieve professional experience in the communication field.
• Changes made in communication programs.
Time: 2.30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

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Business Meeting: FELAFACS-NCA Collaboration Agenda The following issues will be discussed at the end o the event:
• Suggestions to make stronger the alliance between NCA and FELAFACS.
• Strategies to make possible the publication in English of the Journal Diálogos de La Comunicación produced by FELAFACS and recommendation to begin its indexation process.
• Strategies to obtain financial aid to make possible the participation of Latin American scholars at the 2012 NCA Conference.
Time: 4:15 – 5:45 PM

Coordinator: Solón Calero, FELAFACS representative.
NCA Representative: Brad Mello, Associate Director for Educational Initiatives