Artist Residency (France)

Applied ICDArt Research Residency, L’AiR Arts programs, October 8 – 22, 2019, Paris, France. Deadline: May 8, 2019.

As part of the L’AiR Arts programs,​ the Art Research Residency is designed to encourage artistic encounters and foster cultural exchanges for artists from all over the world.  The program enables participants to evaluate their place as an international artist in Paris and situate their artistic exploration and practice within both the historical and contemporary context.

Located in Montparnasse, the host partner, FIAP Paris, provides a welcoming and  inclusive atmosphere with rooms and spaces designed for your comfort. As an International Exchange Centre, it fosters initiatives which contribute to the promotion of a global citizenship.

NOTE: there are several other types of residencies as well, having different deadlines and dates. The upcoming multidisciplinary residency in January-February 2020, will be dedicated to the 100th Anniversary of the inter-war period of Ecole de Paris and its historical legacy. The goals of this residency is not only to highlight the important role that international artists have played in Paris during the 20th Century interwar period, but also to support international dialogue towards an open and free society of today. And sometimes art professors, historians, or curators are included in these residencies, not only practicing artists.

Erasmus+ Virtual Exchanges

Applied ICDErasmus+ Virtual Exchange is part of the Erasmus+ programme, providing an accessible, ground-breaking way for young people to engage in intercultural learning.

Working with Youth Organisations and Universities, Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange is open to any young person aged 18-30 residing in Europe and the Southern Mediterranean. Through a range of activities, Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange aims to expand the reach and scope of the Erasmus+ programme through Virtual Exchanges, which are technology-enabled people-to-people dialogues sustained over a period of time.

Specific programs include:

  • Professional development for youth workers and university educators to learn how to develop a Transnational Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange Project (TEP) in order to enrich and expand existing programmes.

  • Advocacy training bringing young people from different backgrounds together to develop parliamentary debate skills with the support of a network of trained debate team leaders, fostering listening and understanding through advocacy training.

  • Interactive Open Online Courses across cultural contexts and national boundaries to learn with peers from diverse backgrounds using bite-sized video lectures, supported by skill building activities and facilitated intercultural discussions.

 

New Website Launched: Cosmopolis2045

Applied ICDNew website launched by CMM Institute: Cosmopolis2045.

What if a whole community treated relationships with other people as if they really mattered? What if a whole community took dialogue and deliberation seriously? And what if that community tried with all their hearts to bring about a better social world in all the myriad of ways we engage in communication with others in our world? These were the questions asked by a group of scholars and practitioners sponsored by the CMM Institute. The Cosmopolis2045 website is their answer.

The Cosmopolis2045 website depicts an imagined community set in the future (circa 2045) in which residents and leaders of the community have adopted a communication-centric view of how their own and other social worlds function. This website offers an intriguing look at a possible near future in which dialogue and deliberation are an integral part of everyday community events and are at the heart of city functioning. The website is also an information-rich resource for teaching classes on communication, especially cosmopolitan communication and for exploring the implications of a communication-centric view for a range of educational, legal, governance, and associated community practices.

Listen: Learning from Intercultural Storytelling (Germany)

Applied ICDListen: Learning from Intercultural Storytelling (Germany).

The aim of LISTEN is to use “applied storytelling”, meaning storytelling without “professional” storytellers, in its many forms and functions as educational approach for the work with refugees – be it to support language learning, to exchange about cultural differences, to create visions etc.

In order to give refugees a voice in the receiving societies and to support their integration, LISTEN will explore different approaches to storytelling and how radio and other forms of audio broadcasting (e.g. podcasting) can be used as medium to share those stories.

Fiction Celebrates Common Humanity

Applied ICDEmre, M. (1 November 2018).  This library has new books by major authors, but they can’t be read until 2114. New York Times

The Future Library is a work of art that will take an astonishing 100 years to complete:

“In a small clearing in the forests of Nordmarka, one hour outside the city limits of Oslo [Norway], a thousand spruce trees are growing. They will grow for the next 96 years, until 2114, when they will be felled, pulped, pressed and dyed to serve as the paper supply for the Scottish artist Katie Paterson’s Future Library: an anthology of 100 previously unpublished books written by some of the 21st century’s most celebrated writers. There will be one book for every year the trees will have grown, each a donation from a writer chosen by the Future Library’s board of trustees — a gift from the literary gatekeepers of the present to the readers of the future.”

How is this relevant to intercultural dialogue?

“Turkish novelist Elif Shefak [who provided the fourth manuscript in the project]…describes writing a novel for the Future Library as ‘a secular act of faith’ in a world that seems to have gone mad, a world that violently accentuates the differences between people instead of celebrating their common humanity. ‘When you write a book,’ she says, ‘you have the faith that it will reach out to someone else, to someone who is different from you and it will connect us. That you will be able to transcend the boundaries of the self, that was given to you at birth, that you will be able to touch someone else’s reality.'”

The Power of Story

Applied ICDBarlow, Susanna. (31 October 2018). The power of story. The Nasiona.

“The collective story of what it means to be human and how we should treat one another is the foundation upon which our cultures, our religions, our rituals, and even our identities are predicated upon. Stories are the bedrock of civilizations and the mortar between societies. While there is much diversity among humans, it is through our shared story that we find mutual understanding and cooperation. It is also through stories that we create wars, incite violence against each other, and isolate ourselves from others’ suffering. Stories bind us to each other, and we can be bonded as easily by hatred as by love through a shared story. And when our hostility, our judgment, and misunderstandings cause us to battle each other, we still end up tethered to one another by the story of that conflict.”

One Small Step by StoryCorps

Applied ICDStoryCorps has started a new project, One Small Step, as a tool for encouraging dialogue.

“Over the last 15 years, StoryCorps has perfected a method for helping people feel more connected and for reminding us of the inherent worth of every person and every story. People come together to have otherwise impossible conversations, using our tools and questions. The microphone gives them license to talk about things they otherwise might not discuss.

Now, we are doing something different. We are asking people with different political views to record a StoryCorps interview with each other. Why? To break down boundaries created by politics and remember our shared humanity. To remind us that we have more in common than divides us and that treating those with whom we disagree with decency and respect is essential to a functioning democracy.

With One Small Step, we are seeking to counteract intensifying political divides, by facilitating and recording conversations that enable people who disagree to listen to each other with respect.”

Media Literacy Week Resources 2018

Applied ICD4th Annual U.S. Media Literacy Week, November 5-9, 2018.

“Media Literacy is the ability to ACCESS, ANALYZE, EVALUATE, COMMUNICATE and CREATE using all forms of communication. The mission of Media Literacy Week is to highlight the power of media literacy education and its essential role in education today.” Media literacy is a prerequisite for intercultural dialogue; without it, dialogue cannot occur.

NAMLE provides a wide variety of resources, including Free DVD/Streaming + Discussion Guide (for a limited time).

Media Literacy Week 2018 Continue reading “Media Literacy Week Resources 2018”

2019 UN’s International Year of Indigenous Languages

Applied ICD“On 21 October 2016 the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 2019 the International Year of Indigenous Languages, beginning on 1 January 2019. The International Year is an important international cooperation mechanism and a year-long celebration, involving a range of different stakeholders, dedicated to preserve, revitalize, and promote indigenous languages; as languages matter for social, economic and political development, peace building and reconciliation.

Indigenous languages are essential to sustainable development; they constitute the vast majority of the world’s linguistic diversity, and are an expression of cultural identity, diversity and a unique understanding of the world. The disappearance of indigenous languages has a negative impact on areas directly affecting lives of indigenous peoples such as, politics, health, justice, education and access to ICTs among other things.”

embRACE LA

Applied ICDThis nice example of applied intercultural dialogue was published a few months ago, but I just ran across it:

Bliss, Laura. (19 April 2018). What happens when 1,000 strangers talk race in L.A.? CityLab.

1000 Angelenos gathered at 100 dinners in April 2018 “in private homes around town…through a city-backed initiative to spark civic and civil dialogue…embRACE L.A., a city council initiative to open up civic and civil dialogues about race…The goal is simply to create space for neighbors to talk frankly about race.”