CFP Linguistic Landscape Workshop (Thailand)

ConferencesCFP The 11th Linguistic Landscape Workshop (XIScape2019), 4 – 6 June 2019, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. Deadline: 1 December 2018.

As the first Linguistic Landscape workshop convened in Asia, the theme for this year’s XIScape2019 is, appropriately, “East Meets West: Social Reflection and Integration.”

OBJECTIVES

*To attract LL scholars from Europe, America, Africa, and Asia to meet and share their research findings.

*To introduce Asian LL to Western scholars and vice versa.

*To encourage the integration of various branches of knowledge.

*To promote understanding of society through LL study.

CFP International Conference on Language and Social Psychology (Thailand)

Call for Submissions – International Conference on Language and Social Psychology

Now accepting paper and symposia/panel proposals for the 15th International Conference on Language and Social Psychology (ICLASP) which will be held in conjunction with the 5th Language in the Realm of Social Dynamics (LIROD) conference June 22-25th, 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand.

Deadline: 15th February, 2016 (decision by 15th March); later submissions will be reviewed on ongoing basis

This conference will bring together international scholars from different disciplines who explore language and communication in their social contexts using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Papers and symposia that contribute to ongoing scholarship in language and social psychology are invited for submission. Please view our website for the full call for papers and details about registration and the beautiful venue – the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce in Bangkok.

Submissions will be accepted in three forms (see below). Please note that (i) all submissions and presentations need to be in English; (ii) by submitting a proposal for presentation at ICLASP15 you are agreeing to register for and attend the conference should your paper/symposia be accepted.

Send ALL Submissions via email with  “ICLASP LIROD submission” in subject line by 15th February, 2016.

1. Symposia/panel submission should be a single file containing:
(i)     Name(s) and complete contact information of the convener(s)
(ii)    A 250 word maximum introduction to the thematic content of the symposium with title
(iii)   A list of the individual papers, including titles and brief abstracts of each (250 words max.), the names, complete contact information for all authors, clearly indicating the presenter(s). A typical symposium is 3-4 presenters with an introduction and a discussant

2. Individual paper submissions should be a single file containing:
(i)     The names and complete contact information of all authors with a clear indication of who will present the paper
(ii)    A 250 word (maximum) abstract of the presentation that outlines research aims, methods, findings and implications clearly.

3. Student-authored paper submissions should be a single file containing:
(i)     The names and complete contact information of all authors with a clear indication of who will present the paper and which authors are students
(ii)    “Student paper” in the subject line
(iii)   A 250 word (maximum) abstract of the presentation that outlines research aims, methods, findings and implications clearly.

ICADA-SSIS 2016 (Bangkok, Thailand)

Call for Abstracts/Full Papers, the 5th ICADA-SSIS 2016

The National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) organizes the Fifth International Conference on Advancement of Development Administration-Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies 2016 (the 5th ICADA-SSIS 2016) at NIDA, Bangkok Campus, Thailand, on May 26-28, 2016. The major theme is “ASEAN and Globalization: New Paradigm, Interdependency, Democracy, and Accountability (N.I.D.A.).”

At the conference, scholars in social sciences and interdisciplinary studies and those who have worked in the area of social and economic development will present their research/review articles related to the
major theme. This will be beneficial to academia and professionals, both nationally and internationally.

We would like to extend our invitation to scholars, university instructors and students, and independent researchers to submit their abstracts/full papers of their research/review articles for presentation at the conference and/or inclusion in the Proceedings. Please visit our website or contact us via email for the deadlines and other information.

CFP International Conference on Languages, Literature & Society (Bangkok, Thailand)

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Ithaca College, New York, USA, International Center for Research & Development, Sri Lanka, JK University, India & Unique Conferences Canada  are proud to announce the Third  International Conference on  Languages, Literature and Society (LLS2016) which  will  be held from 18-19 January, 2016, Bangkok Thailand.

Languages 2016  is an interactive platform to connect and reconnect colleagues around the world. You can meet 2013, 2015 participants as well as new participants in our conferences. Languages2016  is the premier knowledge building event and the largest gathering in Language community in  the Global South.

Check the list of topics accepted. Paper submission guidelines also available.

Abstracts due: September 15, 2015

CFP ICADA-SIS 2015 (Thailand)

Call for Abstracts–The 4th  ICADA—SSIS 2015

The National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) organizes the Fourth International Conference on Advancement of Development Administration—Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies 2015 (the 4th ICADA—SSIS 2015) at NIDA, Bangkok Campus, Thailand, on May 28-30, 2015. The major theme is “ASEAN and Globalization: Transparency, Integrity, and Sustainability.”

At the conference, scholars in social sciences and interdisciplinary studies and those who have worked in the area of social and economic development will present their research/review articles related to the major theme. This will be beneficial to academia and professionals, both nationally and internationally.

We would like to extend our invitation to scholars, university instructors and students, and independent researchers to submit their abstracts of their research/review articles for presentation at the conference. The deadline for abstract submission is March 15, 2015.

Conquering the Cultural Barriers of Teaching in Thailand by Charles McKinney

Conquering the Cultural Barriers of Teaching in Thailand
By Charles McKinney

Charles McKinney with students

I moved to Bangkok, Thailand in January 2013 to earn my master’s degree as a full-time student at Webster University Thailand. I needed to find work to support myself. After two months of hunting, I landed a job at a private language school teaching English, something I was qualified to do as a TESOL-certified American with two years of previous overseas ESL expertise.

Having never taught Thai students before, I initially struggled to satisfy their learning needs. The students expected me to teach by talking; they wanted to participate as little as possible. My boss told me that, unlike American students who take an active role, Thai students are often quite passive learners.

Classes were mostly one-on-one, a new format for me. A few lessons were cancelled after students griped about my teaching methods, disliking the fact that I was following the textbook lesson plan precisely rather than teaching from my knowledge of the topics and using the book minimally. I started out teaching academic writing and grammar to adolescents who found the material dry; thus my challenge was to make it more interesting for them.

Really, I had no lessons in technique: my busy boss usually gave me the necessary resources to teach and then left me to figure out the rest on my own with minimum advice. So, after nearly a month of floundering to improve my teaching performance my boss decided to give me a two-month hiatus (although I did not know this at the time). It turned out she was right: I needed more time to adapt to the culture and the students.

A few months later, I was called back to teach a new academic writing class for a mid-career professional who wanted to return to school. This time I brought my computer with me, using the Internet as an aid to my lesson plan. I prepared PowerPoint presentations to convey the material in an engaging and orderly manner. Throughout the two-month class, we managed to build rapport and exchange cultural knowledge that helped us to understand one another as individuals.

“Here are pictures of my Buddhist monk ceremony, a rite of passage that many Thai men experience,” my student shared with me one day. In return, I showed him a student newspaper from my college days. “This is my pride and joy as former editor-in-chief of the paper; you can learn about my culture through this medium,” I told him. It was one of those cultural insight moments I cherished. As our class progressed, he gave my boss positive feedback about me – and my confidence in my new techniques improved.

I was not only the first American, but the first African-American teacher this school hired. I have now taught students from Bhutan and Russia as well as Thailand. This experience has taught me the values of patience, flexibility, humility and effective cross-cultural communication. Teachers can make a difference in students’ lives, especially in cultures that are drastically different from their own, but students also make a difference in their teachers’ lives. They learned some English, but I learned about their cultures. Creating a comfortable space for students to be themselves, and remembering that teachers also learn from their students, can foster wonderful intercultural dialogues.

Charles McKinney is a recent MA media communications graduate from Webster University Thailand. Having embarked on a rewarding career of ESL/EFL teaching as an expat in East Asia, Charles is hoping to secure an English Language Fellowship with the US Embassy for the new school year and is making plans to possibly join the Peace Corps next year. CID’s website was helpful during Charles’s master’s thesis research, and he wrote this essay as a way of giving back. Contact him through LinkedIn.

UNESCO conf on Education

UNESCO convened the 16th UNESCO-APEID International Conference, The Heart of Education: Learning to Live Together, in collaboration with the Ministry of Education in Thailand, the Asian-Pacific Network for International Education and Values (APNIEVE), Pearson Thailand and J.P. Morgan. The Conference was intended to facilitate discussions on leading-edge thinking about learning, reflect on the linkages between learning and social development, explore approaches and tools to enhance learning, and identify enabling policies and instruments to promote learning to live together.

More than 250 participants from 30 countries all over the world attended the Conference that was held in Bangkok from 21 – 23 November. Copies of the papers presented are now available here.

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