KC98 Essentialism

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC#98: Essentialism, by Shanoy Coombs. Click on the thumbnail to download the PDF. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC98 Essentialism

Coombs, S. (2020). Essentialism. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 98. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/07/kc98-essentialism.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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Shanoy Coombs Profile

ProfilesShanoy Coombs is a decade rich Development Communications Specialist based in the Caribbean with local, regional and international expertise spanning several industries in the public, private and International NGO sectors.

Shanoy CoombsHer MA research at the University of Sheffield, UK focuses on the role of Intercultural Communication in Multi Stakeholder platforms and will complement her prior work experience in multicultural and intercultural settings.

Shanoy has consulted with International organizations such as the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization for Jamaica, The Bahamas and Belize as well as the European Union and has worked on projects funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the Caribbean Development Bank and Grand Challenges Canada.

She has also served as Communications Chairperson for the United Nations Communications Group Caribbean cluster where she provided oversight for joint United Nations activities in the caribbean that require communications support as a part of the One UN Strategy.

Shanoy also teaches Public Speaking sessions via the University of Sheffield’s student union and has led communications training sessions on behalf of several clients.

For more about her visit her website.

Publications prepared on behalf of organizations while an employee:


Work for CID:

Shanoy Coombs won a prize in the 2020 CID Video Competition. She also wrote KC98: Essentialism.

2nd Prize in CID Video Competition – Shanoy Coombs

CID Video CompetitionCID’s third video competition is now over, and the judges have reviewed all the videos. As a reminder, the instructions were to show that listening is how intercultural dialogue starts, in 90-120 seconds, on video.

2nd prize goes to Shanoy Coombs,  who comes from Jamaica, and who is studying Intercultural Communication and International Development at the University of Sheffield, in the UK, where she blogs about communication, culture and Intercultural communication issues.

Title: Listen Towards Intercultural Dialogue

Description: “It’s easy to listen to others who are like you but not always those who think and act differently. Yet for Intercultural Dialogue to be effective, we have to listen to those who are different from us. This video highlights the many benefits of listening as a part of the conflict resolution process. The video specifically highlights the native voices of persons from different cultural backgrounds and each person shares one main benefit of listening as a part of the Intercultural Dialogue process. The video then transitions to a singular language and emphasizes the point about listening. The video therefore shows the importance of individuality in Intercultural Dialogue as well as collective aims of the process.”

There were first, second and third place winners, and an award of excellence. Each of these is being highlighted in a separate post, as they warrant our attention. My thanks to the judges of the competition, professionals who made time to review student videos. Thanks also to all the competitors, who took the time to really think about how listening is where intercultural dialogue starts, despite the pandemic.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue