Intercultural Competencies Applied to Public Administration (Spain)

Applied ICDGuide on Intercultural competencies applied to the development of public administration projects, Intercultural Cities Programme, Spain.

Guide to intercultural competencies

In response to a grant from the Intercultural Cities Programme, several cities in Spain have successfully concluded a project on developing the intercultural skills of public administration staff as a key element for advancing further in the building of strong intercultural cities and territories. The assumption is that an intercultural competent staff at the service of the public administration will result in better municipal services, increase users’ satisfaction, and contribute to greater trust and sense of belonging.

The project responds to the existing gap in documentation by designing a practical handbook for city officials, transforming the concept of intercultural competence into practical language for local administration officers,  defining the basics of an intercultural competent public action, and training  local administration staff.

Webinar: Interculturalism and Anti-Racism in Cities

EventsInterculturalism and anti-racism in cities, Webinar, Intercultural Cities (ICC) and Laboratory for Research on Intercultural Relations (LABRRI) at the University of Montreal, 26 February 2021, at 9 a.m. (Canada; 3 p.m. CET), online.

In cities across the world, proponents of interculturalism (an approach focused on communication and positive interactions) and anti-racism (an approach more concerned with social and racial discrimination) have been active in the fight for justice and equality. While activists in these two fields clearly have shared goals, the two approaches are sometimes at odds with each in terms of the strategies that should be used to affect change. While it is often argued that the two approaches are complementary, there is also a tendency to subordinate one approach to the other, without asking fundamental questions about which approach is best suited to address a particular set of issues at a particular moment in time.

This webinar, which is aimed at people whose work involves trying to make cities more inclusive places, will address the tensions between interculturalism and anti-racism in an attempt to find ways in which the two can better support each other’s efforts in the global fight for economic equality and social justice.

Museums in an Intercultural Context

The result of a collaboration between the Department of Cultural Management at the Universiteit Antwerpen (Flanders, Belgium) and the Department of Museum Studies at the Université du Québec a Montréal (Quebec, Canada), an intercultural tool aimed at museums in urban context has recently been published. The grid was conceived as an analytical framework for a research project entitled The city museum in an intercultural context. Fostering dialogue in culturally diverse urban environments: perspectives from Montreal, Antwerp, Ghent and Rotterdam.

Inspired by the Council of Europe’s Intercultural Cities programme, collaboration between researchers and students at both universities involved an analysis of four city museums in Quebec, Flanders and the Netherlands and how they approached intercultural dialogue.

The analytical grid produced in the context of the research project can be used by all types of museums and heritage institutions wishing to reflect upon their engagement with diverse communities. Museums may find it useful for initiating brainstorming sessions and self-assessment exercises, supporting planning processes, conducting intercultural project evaluations or facilitating benchmarking and the exchange of strategic information. Researchers in the heritage and cultural management fields may also find it useful for collecting, analysing and comparing data on issues related to diversity and intercultural dialogue in the museum sector.

The grid addresses three levels of analysis:
*Environmental analysis, including the sociodemographic environment of the city, the policy environment of the museum, the institutional environment of the museum and the governance environment of the museum.
*Museum analysis, including an institutional overview of the museum and an intercultural audit of the museum.
*Project analysis, including an analysis of projects with intercultural components.

Museum professionals and researchers may use one or several of these sections, depending on their needs. Data can be collected using a variety of means, including interviews with museum staff, examination of strategic documents and field observation.

The intercultural tool for museums is available for free.

Original article published by Asia-Europe Museum Network.