KC28 Postcolonialism Translated into German

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#28: Postcolonialism, which Raka Shome wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Maria Faust has now translated into German.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC28 Postcolonialism_GermanShome, R. (2017). Postkolonialismus. (M. Faust, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 28. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/kc28-postcolonialism_german.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

KC28 Postcolonialism Translated into French

Key Concepts in ICDContinuing translations of Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, today I am posting KC#28: Postcolonialism, which Raka Shome wrote for publication in English in 2014, and which Colin Olphand has now translated into French.

As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists of Key Concepts organized chronologically by publication date and number, alphabetically by concept, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC28 Postcolonialism_FrenchShome, R. (2017). Post-colonialisme. (C. Olphand, trans). Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 28. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2017/09/kc28-postcolonialism_french1.pdf

If you are interested in translating one of the Key Concepts, please contact me for approval first because dozens are currently in process. As always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. If you are new to CID, please provide a brief resume. This opportunity is open to masters students and above, on the assumption that some familiarity with academic conventions generally, and discussion of intercultural dialogue specifically, are useful.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

CFP Mobilities, Communication & Asia: Postmodern Frameworks

Call for articles for special issue “MOBILITIES, COMMUNICATION AND ASIA: POSTCOLONIAL FRAMEWORKS” of International Journal of Communication
Edited by Mohan J. Dutta & Raka Shome, National University of Singapore

We are inviting high quality papers on mobilities and communication from interdisciplinary scholars working in the Asian context.

The global movement of capital, commodities, and labor is constituted amid political and economic structures that render salient certain meanings of mobility while at the same time erasing other possibilities for interpreting mobility. Further, the global movement of capital, while enabling and encouraging mobility for some, also render many others immobile, disconnected/erased from the possibilities of movement. To that extent, mobility and immobility are not binaries but are interrelated—an interrelation that expresses and captures the numerous desires and violences of globalization. The figure of the migrant and the various processes of migration make these relations visible while rendering invisible other imaginations of migrancy. Linked to this are mediated and communication practices—such as technology, films, music, social media, remittances, cultural commodities, and more—that play an intrinsic role in shaping and informing various types of migratory movements or lack therefor. Additionally, the transnational migration of communication practices themselves constitute new forms of mobilities and immobilities, agency and identity formations, imaginations and desires.

Communication is central to these above-mentioned processes.  For example, technology firms are constantly developing new communication language through software that requires a constant flow of transnational expert workers who are often treated in problematic ways (in terms of cultural recognition and wages) in “host” nations. Similarly, finance capital globally circulates through communicative values and processes (including migrant remittances to their nation of “origin’—a process itself underwritten by non-western values of domesticity and familiality). Transnational movements of celebrities and popular culture (for instance, in Asia) serve diasporic populations in many parts of Asia that have implications for their migrant experience as well as the production of a transnational Asian identity. Disempowered and often stateless migrants (for instance migrant Bangladeshi workers in Asia) connect to or engage their music in their diasporic situations —to produce some sense of cultural security in an otherwise coercive exploitative condition (lacking decent food, shelter, wages and more).

Relations of gender, sexuality, religion, class and nationality are central considerations in these phenomena since migration itself is often wrought with gender and religious violences, discrimination and exploration of poor laborers, and the devaluing of peoples of particular nations in global migratory practices (for instance, White Europeans or Americans are usually seen as “expatriates” while the word migration is reserved for mobilities of non-western peoples even within non-western ‘host’ nations).

Communication Studies as a formal field has hardly paid attention these issues—issues that require urgent exploration from a communication perspective.  Such an exploration will further move the field of Communication Studies into considerations of the many dilemmas and challenges of the 21st century that are grounded in the politics of migration.

This edited Special Section seeks to comprehend such phenomena, with specific attention to Asia. It will examine the interplay of communication (broadly considered)—particularly mediated practices—and im/mobilities, attending to how the intersection between the two illustrate the movement of people, labor, representations, commodities, technology and more, across global circuits of culture, economy, and geopolitics.

Submissions will be limited to 6000 words, all-inclusive

We first solicit detailed abstracts of approximate 500-600 words.  Due:  April 31, 2017. Please send abstract to Mohan Dutta at cnmmohan AT nus.edu.sg

Authors of selected abstracts will be notified by May 31, 2017.

Final papers due:  July 31, 2017 Please submit to Mohan Dutta at cnmmohan AT nus.edu.sg

Please follow the author guidelines prepared by the International Journal of Communication.

Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue in Translation!

Key Concepts in ICDI was recently asked about the possibility of translating some of the Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue into other languages than English. This is a great idea, and I was happy to agree. The first one appears today, KC#28: Postcolonialism, originally written by Raka Shome for publication in English in 2014, now has been translated into Italian by Miguel Ángel Guerrero Ramos. My thanks to Paola Giorgis for serving as Italian editor.

As with the originals, all translations of Key Concepts will be made available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists organized chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

KC28 postcolonialism-ItalianShome, R. (2016). Postcolonialismo. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 28 (M. A. Guerrero Ramos, Trans.) Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.org/2016/06/20/key-concepts-in-intercultural-dialogue-in-translation/

If other scholars would be interested in translating any of the other Key Concepts, please send me an email. If I do not already know you, please send along a short CV that includes information about your language skills. If you are fluent in a language other than English and do not have time to create a translation yourself but would be interested in serving as a reviewer for someone else’s draft, let me know that. As a rule, I will assume that all authors will at least be enrolled in masters’ coursework, if not further along.

And, as always, if there is a concept you think should be written up as one of the Key Concepts, whether in English or any other language, propose it. As of this writing, 78 have been published in English, but words from Chinese, Portuguese, Japanese, Spanish, Belarusian, German and Arabic have also been introduced (with the discussion provided in English). Authors of the non-English words will, for obvious reasons, receive first choice of now translating their discussion into the same language as the concept.

As is all typical in academic publishing, there is no funding for this project. Rather than financial compensation, you gain a line on your CV, and the pleasure of having your work read by many colleagues (total views of the publications page have nearly reached 5000 as of this writing, a figure which does not include views of each post introducing a new concept, which can stand in the hundreds). And, at one page, these are particularly quick and easy to write up in the first place, and should be equally quick to translate or review.

Please do not begin work on a concept or a translation until you receive approval. Not only would it be a waste of time to inadvertently duplicate effort, but there are a few basic rules and a template to follow, which will be shared after your proposal has been approved.

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, Director
Center for Intercultural Dialogue


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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Key Concept #28: Postcolonialism by Raka Shome

Key Concepts in ICDThe next issue of Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue is now available. This is KC28: Postcolonialism by Raka Shome. As always, all Key Concepts are available as free PDFs; just click on the thumbnail to download. Lists organized  chronologically by publication date and numberalphabetically by concept in English, and by languages into which they have been translated, are available, as is a page of acknowledgments with the names of all authors, translators, and reviewers.

kc28-smShome, R. (2014). Postcolonialism. Key Concepts in Intercultural Dialogue, 28. Available from:
https://centerforinterculturaldialogue.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/key-concept-postcolonialism.pdf

The Center for Intercultural Dialogue publishes a series of short briefs describing Key Concepts in intercultural Dialogue. Different people, working in different countries and disciplines, use different vocabulary to describe their interests, yet these terms overlap. Our goal is to provide some of the assumptions and history attached to each concept for those unfamiliar with it. As there are other concepts you would like to see included, send an email to the series editor, Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz. If there are concepts you would like to prepare, provide a brief explanation of why you think the concept is central to the study of intercultural dialogue, and why you are the obvious person to write up that concept.


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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Why Cosmopolitanism?

Ah, cosmopolitanism.  The first time I found you, I was taking a class on global and transnational ethnography with Dr. Takeyuki Tsuda.  I read an article by Ulf Hannerz titled Cosmopolitans and Locals in World Culture.  He has since retracted many of the things he wrote in this article.  And yet, for the first time, I felt that I had read an intercultural theory (in an anthropology class, no less) that actually applied to my life.  So much of the work I’d done up until this point examined intercultural theories that provided dichotomies.  You were EITHER individualist OR collectivist.  When you travel, you EITHER make friends from your home culture OR your host culture.  You are EITHER a patriot OR an interculturalist.  Profoundly unsatisfying to me, as my experiences often hinged on dialectical tensions and dialogical experiences—those moments that exist between the both/and, rather than the either/or.  Cosmopolitanism was the first theory I’d ever read that said you could be BOTH rooted AND rootless; BOTH local AND global; that maybe you would be the most comfortable with others who experienced similar tensions, who live in spaces of in-between-ness.

And then the backlash set in.  Cosmopolitanism, you were not what I thought you were!  Cosmopolitanism, I was informed, really isn’t a theory of both/and.  This is a theory of exclusivity, of the ‘class consciousness of frequent travelers’; sure there was a sense of both/and-ness, but only for those privileged enough to be able to engage in voluntary sojourns that inevitably involve Western imperialism and cultural commodification.  Why would anyone want to study this concept? I was interrogated about the inherent violence that cosmopolitanism—particularly in its Kantian and previously Greco-Roman Stoic iterations.  This is a theory of global citizenship only accessible to those who have the privilege of being citizens in that kind of world.

And yet, cosmopolitanism, you continued to proliferate, to grow in breadth and depth.  From when I first learned the term in 2006, to the present day (2014), cosmopolitanism theorists flocked to you, across disciplines ranging from sociology and political economy to religious studies and linguistics.  Everyone was coming to the party—which also involved directly addressing the critiques of elitism and western imperialism brought with such ferocity by its opponents.  Forms of vernacular, non-Western, non-elite and critical cosmopolitanism, which have actually been around since its nascence in places like ancient China in the philosophies of Mo Tzu and Mencius, as well as being promoted by the African philosophy of Maat, are resurfacing in work by such scholars as Pnina Werbner, George Delanty and Walter Mignolo.

In intercultural communication, we are, to extend the metaphor, late to your party.  Intercultural communication scholars, particularly those who embrace critical and postcolonial approaches, are only now beginning to accept that this cosmopolitanism a term that is growing in strength, rather than waning.  As the world shrinks and difference becomes something that can no longer be hidden from (if it ever could), cosmopolitanism in its critical and vernacular forms has reemerged as a theory for our time, which insists not that we should all embrace each others’ many and varied values, but rather that we should understand that we all have values, and all hold those values dear to ourselves and the people and things we love.  This kind of dialogic empathy requires hope as an approach to non-binary thinking.  Cosmopolitanism is not a project that can be forced upon people; instead, it must be voluntarily embraced as an ethic of care for the world, from those next door to those across the ocean.   My colleague Dr. Nilanjana Bardhan and I have recently published a book titled Cultivating Cosmopolitanism for Intercultural Communication:  Communicating as Global Citizens, in which we propose cosmopolitanism’s use for our discipline as a space of hopeful dialogue to move from either/or to a space of both/and.  Cosmopolitanism, you may not be the answer, but you certainly deserve to be a part of both the discipline the dialogue.

Miriam S. Sobre-Denton
Assistant Professor | Intercultural Communication
Southern Illinois University Carbondale