Crossing boundaries Asia/Pacific CFP

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

Working Title: Crossing Boundaries: Working and Communicating in the Asia Pacific Region
Proposal Submission Deadline: July 15, 2011

A book edited by
Jolanta Aritz, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Francesca Bargiela-Chiappini, Ph.D.
Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, UK

Robyn C. Walker, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

We invite you to submit a chapter for an edited volume of research on Asian Business Discourse(s) (ABD). Routledge Publishing has expressed an interest in the topic of Asian discourse(s) and is interested in publishing the volume.

We are looking for manuscripts that provide:
*       Illumination of the field: Past, current, and future
*       Theoretical developments in the field
*       Empirical research studies.
The contributions should be focused on the use of business or organizational discourse methods and their application in the area of Asian Business Discourse(s).

We use the term “business discourse” to refer to authentic language interaction, talk, and writing in a corporate setting that is “founded on the twin notions of discourse as situated action and of language as work” (Nickerson & Chiappini, 2002, p. 277, emphasis original). It is a language-based approach of looking at individuals who engage in interaction in a corporate setting that is motivated by a concern to understand how they communicate strategically in an organizational context (Bargiela-Chiappini, Nickerson, & Planken, 2007). The variety of methodologies employed to conduct such analysis include conversation analysis, pragmatics, corpus linguistics, genre analysis, ethnography, and rhetorical analysis.

The term “organizational discourse” is used by scholars in the fields of management and communication working in the tradition of North American organizational communication; although, one can also come across the term “organizational rhetoric” used in more management-oriented scholarship. Based on the way the two terms are used, we conclude that the rhetorical emphasis, heightened by the use of the term “organizational rhetoric,” is  subsumed under “organizational discourse” as one of four domains of discourse that constitute texts for analysis. The other three domains include conversation and dialogue; narratives and stories; and tropes or metaphors (Grant et al. 2004).

The field of business and organizational discourse has traditionally relied on a Western paradigm/ perspective. Asian Business Discourse(s) is an enterprise with Western antecedents but with increasingly localized expressions, which reflect the concerns and expectations of specific geo-political and socio-economic locales (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press, emphasis in original). Some East and South East Asian scholarship is still emerging (see: Jung 2009; Chew 2009) while other has reached a more advanced stage of development (e.g. Nair-Venugopal, 2009; Cheng 2009; Zhu and Li 2009; Tanaka 2009) (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press).

The proposed volume intends to give a stronger voice to research on business communication practices in Asian countries and build an intersection between scholarship coming out of that region and business practices that would benefit from integrating the findings into their training programs and operational practices. The global economy has created new realities for businesses, and the need for understanding differing communication practices and cultural values is greater than ever, particularly in regard to the surging economies in the East.

Abstract Submission Guidelines
Researchers are invited to submit a one-page proposal clearly explaining the objective of their proposed chapter, including an explanation of the research methodology used, the research questions and the key findings of their study. Please send abstracts as e-mail attachments to
rcwalker@marshall.usc.edu or aritz@marshall.usc.edu by July 15, 2011.

Abstracts should include:
1. The title of the paper
2. A list of 3-5 key words describing the area and focus
3. The name(s) of the author(s) and their affiliation(s)
4. The corresponding author’s e-mail address and contact details
5. A short biographical statement for each author.

References
Bargiella-Chiappini, F. (in press). Asian Business Discourse(s). In J. Aritz & R. Walker (Eds.) Discourse Perspectives on Organizational Communication. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F., Nickerson, C. & Planken, B. (2007). Business Discourse. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F. &  Nickerson, C. (2002). Business Discourse: Old Debates, New Horizons. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, (IRAL), 40 (4): 273-381.

Grant, Hardy, C., Oswick, C. & Putnam, L. (2004). The Sage Handbook of Organizational Discourse. London: Sage.

Thank you,
Robyn Walker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Clinical Management Communication
USC Marshall School of Business

Organizing special issue

CALL FOR PAPERS

Organizing : a Matter of Language, Discourse, or Communication ?
A special issue of the French journal Sciences de la Société
Guest editors :
Bertrand Fauré, LERASS, Université Toulouse 3.
Daniel Robichaud, Department of communication, Université de Montréal

The French interdisciplinary journal Sciences de la Société (SdS) will publish, for its 80th edition, a special issue aimed at fostering dialogue between disciplinary and linguistic research communities that study organizations and processes of organizing. Organizations and organizing processes are at the forefront of contemporary global transformations and change the lives of individuals across the world. Organization studies have also been a growing interest for SdS readers and editors (see issues 74, 63, 61, 59, 50 and 51 in the past 10 years only). More importantly, a common concern in contemporary anglophone and francophone research communities on organizations is the role of language/discourse/communication in the constitution and formation of organizational realities.

In the anglophone world, the “interpretive turn” (Putman & Pacanowski, 1983), among other influences, shaped the emergence of a young field – called Organization communication – that developed progressively into an autonomous and “discipline” (Mumby, 2007; Mumby & Stohl, 2007). With its professional networks, journals, and academic programs, the field has become increasingly institutionalized, especially in the United States and Canada. In parallel with the latter, another field, emerged in the early 1990s in Europe and elsewhere around the notion of organizational discourse and discursive approaches to organizations (Grant, Hardy & Oswick, 2004). Whereas both fields developed rather independently form each other until the 2000s (Jian et al., 2008 ; Taylor, 2008), many bridges have been built since through conferences and journals (e.g., see Teun van Dijk’s Discourse  & Communication).

In the francophone world, scholarly efforts to look at the constitutive role of discourse and communication are still scattered. At least three relatively distinct and rapidly evolving traditions can be identified: (1) the sociology of work and its growing focus on talk-at-work (langage au travail) (Borzeix & Fraenkel, 2005); (2) management sciences and the emergent discursive analysis of organizations (Girin, 1990; Lorino, 2005); and (3) communication studies of organizations (Bernard, 2002; Delcambre, 2000). Despite the diversity of their disciplinary origins, all seem to acknowledge the basic role of language use, discourse, and communication in organizing. But beyond isolated collaborations, an interdisciplinary dialogue is still lacking.

In both linguistic communities, many conceptual issues are in need of being further developed and clarified. As numerous authors have noted in both communities, notions such as discourse, communication, interaction, conversation, texts, and others, are still used in ambiguous and equivocal ways. What do expressions such as “organizations are constituted in, by, or through language/discourse/communication” mean? What do we mean by “constitute” or “constitution”? Do we mean that they are instituted, created, produced, shaped, or enacted? Or do we mean that organizational emergence, perpetuation, and change processes are anchored, embedded or embodied in language/discourse/communication?

SdS calls for manuscripts that address fundamental questions like these through theoretical/conceptual essays and/or empirical studies. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
1. Epistemological and ontological foundations of so-called “constitutive” approaches to communication, discourse, and organization;
2. Theoretical approaches and propositions dealing with the constitutive role of discourse and communication (through performativity, narrative construction, transformative texts, etc.);
3. Methodological approaches for the empirical analysis of discursive materials and interactions that allow us to investigate their organizing properties;
4. The contribution of such approaches to our understanding of organizational processes, such as organizational learning, knowledge management, change, leadership, globalization, strategy, or inter-organizational collaboration, among others.

Submissions will be reviewed in their original language (French or English). If accepted, the final version of each English manuscript will be translated to French by the journal. Papers should not exceed 8,000 words in length, including notes, references and a 150-word abstract. The manuscript should be formatted according to the guidelines provided by the American Psychological Association (APA) format (5th ed.), and submitted as an MS Word document (.doc, .docx) or Rich Text (.rtf) format. Names, emails, addresses and affiliations of authors should be included on a separate page. Papers should be sent as an attachment to the following addresses by December 1st, 2011:
Bertrand.faure@iut-tarbes.fr
daniel.robichaud@umontreal.ca
Jean-louis.darreon@univ-jfc.fr

The guest editors also plan to organize a special workshop in Toulouse, France, in June 2012 to bring together all contributors whose papers will have been selected.

(Originally posted to CRTNET)