CFP Asia Pacific Regional Intercultural Conference (Bali)

The First Asia Pacific Regional Intercultural Conference
Call for Proposals

You are invited and encouraged to participate in the AFS-AAI-SIETAR 2015 Conference on 15-17 April, 2015 in Bali, Indonesia.
Deadline for submission: January 31, 2015

The theme of this conference is: Learning to Live Together. Intercultural Education: From Ideas to Action.

Please submit proposals that explore the best thoughts on the intercultural field evidenced by theory, research or best practices. Asia Pacific regional perspectives highly appreciated. The conference review committee seeks for proposals that reflect emerging ideas, stimulate engaging discussion and learning outcomes.

The criteria for selection: Connection to the theme; Originality and Relevance to the Intercultural Learning and Education audience.

Promotion of product or service is not acceptable topic for session but sponsorship opportunities provided.

Please send submission of Abstract; Session Title; Biography of the presenter/s; Contact details and Audio-visual needs. The tracks are theory, research and best practices. Time allocations: 40 minutes for presentations or 60 minutes for panel discussion.
to : afs.aai.sietar2015@gmail.com

Crossing boundaries Asia/Pacific CFP

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

Working Title: Crossing Boundaries: Working and Communicating in the Asia Pacific Region
Proposal Submission Deadline: July 15, 2011

A book edited by
Jolanta Aritz, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Francesca Bargiela-Chiappini, Ph.D.
Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, UK

Robyn C. Walker, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

We invite you to submit a chapter for an edited volume of research on Asian Business Discourse(s) (ABD). Routledge Publishing has expressed an interest in the topic of Asian discourse(s) and is interested in publishing the volume.

We are looking for manuscripts that provide:
*       Illumination of the field: Past, current, and future
*       Theoretical developments in the field
*       Empirical research studies.
The contributions should be focused on the use of business or organizational discourse methods and their application in the area of Asian Business Discourse(s).

We use the term “business discourse” to refer to authentic language interaction, talk, and writing in a corporate setting that is “founded on the twin notions of discourse as situated action and of language as work” (Nickerson & Chiappini, 2002, p. 277, emphasis original). It is a language-based approach of looking at individuals who engage in interaction in a corporate setting that is motivated by a concern to understand how they communicate strategically in an organizational context (Bargiela-Chiappini, Nickerson, & Planken, 2007). The variety of methodologies employed to conduct such analysis include conversation analysis, pragmatics, corpus linguistics, genre analysis, ethnography, and rhetorical analysis.

The term “organizational discourse” is used by scholars in the fields of management and communication working in the tradition of North American organizational communication; although, one can also come across the term “organizational rhetoric” used in more management-oriented scholarship. Based on the way the two terms are used, we conclude that the rhetorical emphasis, heightened by the use of the term “organizational rhetoric,” is  subsumed under “organizational discourse” as one of four domains of discourse that constitute texts for analysis. The other three domains include conversation and dialogue; narratives and stories; and tropes or metaphors (Grant et al. 2004).

The field of business and organizational discourse has traditionally relied on a Western paradigm/ perspective. Asian Business Discourse(s) is an enterprise with Western antecedents but with increasingly localized expressions, which reflect the concerns and expectations of specific geo-political and socio-economic locales (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press, emphasis in original). Some East and South East Asian scholarship is still emerging (see: Jung 2009; Chew 2009) while other has reached a more advanced stage of development (e.g. Nair-Venugopal, 2009; Cheng 2009; Zhu and Li 2009; Tanaka 2009) (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press).

The proposed volume intends to give a stronger voice to research on business communication practices in Asian countries and build an intersection between scholarship coming out of that region and business practices that would benefit from integrating the findings into their training programs and operational practices. The global economy has created new realities for businesses, and the need for understanding differing communication practices and cultural values is greater than ever, particularly in regard to the surging economies in the East.

Abstract Submission Guidelines
Researchers are invited to submit a one-page proposal clearly explaining the objective of their proposed chapter, including an explanation of the research methodology used, the research questions and the key findings of their study. Please send abstracts as e-mail attachments to
rcwalker@marshall.usc.edu or aritz@marshall.usc.edu by July 15, 2011.

Abstracts should include:
1. The title of the paper
2. A list of 3-5 key words describing the area and focus
3. The name(s) of the author(s) and their affiliation(s)
4. The corresponding author’s e-mail address and contact details
5. A short biographical statement for each author.

References
Bargiella-Chiappini, F. (in press). Asian Business Discourse(s). In J. Aritz & R. Walker (Eds.) Discourse Perspectives on Organizational Communication. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F., Nickerson, C. & Planken, B. (2007). Business Discourse. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F. &  Nickerson, C. (2002). Business Discourse: Old Debates, New Horizons. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, (IRAL), 40 (4): 273-381.

Grant, Hardy, C., Oswick, C. & Putnam, L. (2004). The Sage Handbook of Organizational Discourse. London: Sage.

Thank you,
Robyn Walker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Clinical Management Communication
USC Marshall School of Business