Crossing Boundaries conference

Crossing Boundaries: Working and Communicating in the Asia Pacific Region
Third Conference of the LSP (Languages for Specific Purposes) and Professional Communication Association for the Asia-Pacific Rim
March 13-15, 2012
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Keynote Speaker: Vijay Bhatia, City University of Hong Kong
Plenary Speakers: Gail Fairhurst, the University of Cincinnati, OH; Francesca Bargiela-Chiappini, Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, UK; Clayton Dube, USC US-China Institute, CA

Call for Papers/posters
The conference aims to bring together researchers and practitioners in Languages for Specific Purposes (LSP) and Professional Communication in the Asia-Pacific Rim and beyond to take part in a dialogue on research and collaboration in academic, professional and workplace contexts. To build a clearer understanding of communication in the workplace it is crucial to have effective collaboration between language experts, trainers and institutions specializing in communication skills. Such collaboration in turn is fundamental to the design and implementation of effective pedagogy, assessment and curricula.

We invite papers and posters on any of the following areas:
•Relationships between LSP theory and workplace practices
•Interconnections between discourse and socio-institutional practices
•Collaboration between language teachers/trainers and institutions/organizations
•Functional variation of language in academic and professional contexts
•Discursive and professional practices of specialists
•Disciplinary, intercultural and cross-cultural variation in professional communication & discourse
•Descriptions of language use in professional contexts
•Workplace communication and curriculum design
Papers focusing on the study of languages other than English are most welcome.

Presentation Guidelines
Papers will be allotted 20 minutes, plus 10 minutes for discussion.

Abstract Submission Guidelines
Abstracts should be between 250-300 words and should be sent via e-mail attachments to
rcwalker@marshall.usc.edu or aritz@marshall.usc.edu

Abstracts should include:
1. The title of the paper
2. A list of 3-5 key words describing the area and focus
3. The name(s) of the author(s) and their affiliation(s)
4. The corresponding author’s e-mail address and contact details
All abstracts will be peer-reviewed by a committee composed of members of the conference organizing committee

Registration Information
To ensure conference rates for the hotel, please register before November 1, 2011. Conference registration will be available on the Association’s website http://www1.english.cityu.edu.hk/aplspca/drupal/  after October 1, 2011.

The conference registration fee includes cost of registration, a conference bag, luncheons, coffee breaks, conference dinner, and a reception.

Abstract Submission Deadline
The deadline for receipt of abstracts is December 15, 2011.
Notification of acceptance will be given by January 1, 2012.

Preconference workshops
Two pre-conference workshops will be held on March 13, 2012 by plenary speakers Gail Fairhurst and Francesca Bargiela-Chiappini. Please refer to the registration form for further details.

Proceedings
A selection of conference papers will be published with an international publisher.

About Asia-Pacific LSP & Professional Communication Association

The Asia-Pacific LSP (Languages for Specific Purposes) and Professional Communication Association is an association of Asia-Pacific researchers, teachers and trainers specializing in the study and teaching of languages for specific purposes and professional and organizational communication, and fostering such activities in a broad range of disciplinary fields. The primary aim of the association is to promote transdisciplinary and collaborative research and practice in academic, professional and workplace contexts.

Website: http://www1.english.cityu.edu.hk/aplspca/drupal/

Crossing boundaries Asia/Pacific CFP

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

Working Title: Crossing Boundaries: Working and Communicating in the Asia Pacific Region
Proposal Submission Deadline: July 15, 2011

A book edited by
Jolanta Aritz, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Francesca Bargiela-Chiappini, Ph.D.
Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick, UK

Robyn C. Walker, Ph.D.
Center for Management Communication, Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

We invite you to submit a chapter for an edited volume of research on Asian Business Discourse(s) (ABD). Routledge Publishing has expressed an interest in the topic of Asian discourse(s) and is interested in publishing the volume.

We are looking for manuscripts that provide:
*       Illumination of the field: Past, current, and future
*       Theoretical developments in the field
*       Empirical research studies.
The contributions should be focused on the use of business or organizational discourse methods and their application in the area of Asian Business Discourse(s).

We use the term “business discourse” to refer to authentic language interaction, talk, and writing in a corporate setting that is “founded on the twin notions of discourse as situated action and of language as work” (Nickerson & Chiappini, 2002, p. 277, emphasis original). It is a language-based approach of looking at individuals who engage in interaction in a corporate setting that is motivated by a concern to understand how they communicate strategically in an organizational context (Bargiela-Chiappini, Nickerson, & Planken, 2007). The variety of methodologies employed to conduct such analysis include conversation analysis, pragmatics, corpus linguistics, genre analysis, ethnography, and rhetorical analysis.

The term “organizational discourse” is used by scholars in the fields of management and communication working in the tradition of North American organizational communication; although, one can also come across the term “organizational rhetoric” used in more management-oriented scholarship. Based on the way the two terms are used, we conclude that the rhetorical emphasis, heightened by the use of the term “organizational rhetoric,” is  subsumed under “organizational discourse” as one of four domains of discourse that constitute texts for analysis. The other three domains include conversation and dialogue; narratives and stories; and tropes or metaphors (Grant et al. 2004).

The field of business and organizational discourse has traditionally relied on a Western paradigm/ perspective. Asian Business Discourse(s) is an enterprise with Western antecedents but with increasingly localized expressions, which reflect the concerns and expectations of specific geo-political and socio-economic locales (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press, emphasis in original). Some East and South East Asian scholarship is still emerging (see: Jung 2009; Chew 2009) while other has reached a more advanced stage of development (e.g. Nair-Venugopal, 2009; Cheng 2009; Zhu and Li 2009; Tanaka 2009) (Bargiella-Chiappini, in press).

The proposed volume intends to give a stronger voice to research on business communication practices in Asian countries and build an intersection between scholarship coming out of that region and business practices that would benefit from integrating the findings into their training programs and operational practices. The global economy has created new realities for businesses, and the need for understanding differing communication practices and cultural values is greater than ever, particularly in regard to the surging economies in the East.

Abstract Submission Guidelines
Researchers are invited to submit a one-page proposal clearly explaining the objective of their proposed chapter, including an explanation of the research methodology used, the research questions and the key findings of their study. Please send abstracts as e-mail attachments to
rcwalker@marshall.usc.edu or aritz@marshall.usc.edu by July 15, 2011.

Abstracts should include:
1. The title of the paper
2. A list of 3-5 key words describing the area and focus
3. The name(s) of the author(s) and their affiliation(s)
4. The corresponding author’s e-mail address and contact details
5. A short biographical statement for each author.

References
Bargiella-Chiappini, F. (in press). Asian Business Discourse(s). In J. Aritz & R. Walker (Eds.) Discourse Perspectives on Organizational Communication. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F., Nickerson, C. & Planken, B. (2007). Business Discourse. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bargiela-Chiappini, F. &  Nickerson, C. (2002). Business Discourse: Old Debates, New Horizons. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, (IRAL), 40 (4): 273-381.

Grant, Hardy, C., Oswick, C. & Putnam, L. (2004). The Sage Handbook of Organizational Discourse. London: Sage.

Thank you,
Robyn Walker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Clinical Management Communication
USC Marshall School of Business