Aspen Institute: Program Assistant to Weave (USA)

“Job

Program Assistant, Weave: The Social Fabric Project, Aspen Institute, Washington, DC. Deadline: Open until filled.

 

Weave’s Program Assistant works across each of Weave’s strategic priorities to ensure the operational efficiency and relational focus of the Weave team. This role serves as the primary contact for all inquiries to Weave, offering a warm response to emails, social media, community hub posts, and website correspondence. The Program Assistant will work with Weave team members to coordinate speaking engagements, manage relationships with Weave’s supporters, and support logistics for Weave events.

The Assistant must be highly organized with an ability to monitor and manage multiple moving workstreams to accomplish project success. The Program Assistant is also a skilled communicator and will write correspondence to Weavers and Weave supporters along with content for Weave’s website and social media. The ideal candidate has passion for Weave’s mission, enjoys organizing effective systems, and is at ease getting to know new people of all backgrounds.

Weave: The Social Fabric Project was started by columnist David Brooks and the Aspen Institute in May of 2018 to counter a culture of hyper-individualism in the US that has left Americans divided, isolated and unhappy. This crisis of connection and decline in social trust has led to rising rates of addiction and suicide, persistent inequality and discrimination, and gridlocked politics. Yet in every community, some people have chosen to weave the social fabric by investing in relationships, making commitments to others and creating connection. These “Weavers” are all different. Some work at a suicide hotline, a mentoring program or in schools. Others run a coffee shop where everybody feels at home. Still others just gather neighbors to talk or stop to listen when they see someone distraught. They lead with love, creating countercultural islands where connection and community are more important than ego and self. You will find their stories at WeAreWeavers.org.

Author: Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, the Director of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, manages this website.

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