CFP WFI Student Grants for Social Justice

Call for proposals
Villanova University’s Waterhouse Family Institute for the Study of Communication and Society (WFI) is pleased to ANNOUNCE OUR NEW STUDENT GRANT PROGRAM for 2016/17, and OUR INAUGURAL CALL FOR PROPOSALS (DUE APRIL 22, 2016).

The WFI—endowed by Lawrence Waterhouse, Jr., and housed within Villanova University’s Department of Communication—was founded on the principle that students, scholars, activists, and practitioners of communication have an important role to play in the creation of a socially just world. In addition to our WFI Research Grant program, which supports the work of Communication scholars engaging questions of social justice, we are pleased to announce the creation of a program geared to undergraduate students interested in engaging Communication and social justice!

This program was inspired in the Summer of 2014 by a proposal designed and directed by three Villanova undergraduate alums (who, at the time, were ineligible for our existing faculty research grant program). Moved by the proposal, the WFI provided a grant of $12,660 to Lauren Colegrove, Andrew Balamaci, and Nashia Kamal to assist them in continuing to build on the relationships they had established through Villanova’s (WFI-funded) Social Justice Documentary Film Program. They proposed to teach journalism and reporting skills to the high school students at Heritage Academy in Essiam, Ghana, and, further, to help the school establish a newspaper for their students. Going even further, two of these remarkable young Communication activists are now working on a project in Bangladesh for Summer 2016!

So if you know of any students who are innovative, creative, and passionate about social justice—and who would be able to do great things if only they had the budget and opportunity—then please encourage them to submit a proposal to the new WFI Student Grant Program. Proposals are due no later than Friday, April 22, 2016.

Beginning in 2016-17, the WFI will award up to $10,000 to support an undergraduate student-driven project that demonstrates an innovative connection between communication and social justice.

These projects:
–       must center upon undergraduate (not graduate) students in Communication, although faculty may be involved as advisors and/or instructors of record;
–       must meaningfully connect Communication students to the creation of social justice;
–       must be primarily carried out during Fall 2016 and/or Spring 2017.

Although we do not limit our grants to a specific area of Communication, or particular kind of communication advocacy, all projects supported by the WFI have two things in common: they draw upon and engage topics central to the study and practice of Communication, and they specifically engage communication in terms of its impact on the world around us, its ability to create social change.

WFI Student Grants are available to project leaders who are full-time undergraduate students enrolled in good standing at any US institution of higher education. Awards will be no greater than $10,000 for the 2016-17 academic year. These funds may be applied to the acquisition of resources or equipment, technology, travel, event planning, and/or any other appropriate project related expenses. However, these funds may not be used to provide or supplement faculty or student salaries. Funds will be available beginning in July 2016, for use throughout the 2016-17 academic year; again proposals are due no later than April 22, 2016.

For more details on the WFI and this grant program—including specific information on the grant application requirements and proposal submission—please visit: http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/communication/wfi/studentactivities.html

Questions concerning eligibility, or the nature of projects we support, please contact the Director of the WFI, Dr. Bryan Crable.

WFI grants call 2014/15

WFI Research Grants: Call for 2014/15 Grant Applications

Villanova University’s Waterhouse Family Institute for the Study of Communication and Society (WFI) has set the next application deadline for WFI Research Grants for 2014/15 as Monday, May 5, 2014. The WFI – endowed by Mr. Lawrence Waterhouse, Jr., and housed within Villanova University’s Department of Communication – was founded on the principle that the study and practice of communication requires attention to values, ethics and social justice. One of the ways that we enact this mission is through the annual funding of research grants. These grants support the scholarly work of Communication scholars across the world, work examining communication, its impact on the world around us and its ability to create social change and social justice.

Communication scholars across the nation, and across the world, are invited to apply for funds to support initial or ongoing phases of scholarly research aimed at presentation and publication. Although we do not limit our grants to a specific methodological orientation or subdisciplinary focus, all projects supported by the WFI have two things in common: they make communication the primary, and not secondary, focus, and they engage communication in terms of its impact on the world around us, its ability to create social change. WFI Research Grants are available to faculty at any institution of higher education, postdoctoral researchers, and other doctoral-level scholars. However, eligibility to apply for the WFI grant program is limited to those in Communication or a closely related discipline. Awards are typically in the range of $5000-10,000, and may be applied to the hiring of graduate assistants, acquisition of resources or equipment, travel, and/or any other appropriate research related expenses. However, these funds may not be used to provide or supplement faculty salaries. For more details on the WFI and this research grant process-including specific information on the grant application requirements-please visit the WFI website.

For questions concerning eligibility, or the nature of projects supported, please contact the Director of the WFI, Dr. Bryan Crable.

NOTE: the Center for Intercultural Dialogue has a memorandum of understanding with WFI.

CFP Comm and Social Justice

Communication and Social Justice:
Call for Book Manuscripts

Social justice is a powerful political and ideological concept in the 21st century; it has become an increasingly central idea for those trying to gain a fuller understanding of national and international grassroots politics. An implicit assumption of a social justice perspective is that the integrity of any community is violated when some of its members are systematically deprived of their dignity or equality. This assumption often leads to research whose findings are not comfortable for the status quo: governments, institutions, and disciplines.

Troubador’s Communication and Social Justice book series maintains that the relevance of scholarship should be judged by the degree to which scholarship advances social democratic values, and that these values must advance by way of valid research that provides honest critique and redescription of those institutions that promote and reify poverty, hierarchy, and/or social inequality. Books in the series recognize that concern for underprivileged and underresourced groups is becoming an increasingly important topic about which to theorize and for which to develop interventions. The goal of this series is to explore the theoretical and practical ways that communication scholars can reconceptualize national and international societies so as to enable inclusive and equitable communities to emerge; to seek to construct communities that protect individual freedom while insuring equality and dignity for everyone. Specifically, this series takes the position that potential contributors are intellectual laborers who view their professional commitments as indistinguishable from their social and political identifications. From varying perspectives, each book published in the series will illustrate the vitality of engaged scholarship and the claim that a scholarship of social justice is not incompatible with more traditional “ivy tower” research. A fundamental assumption of the books is that there is no worthier end for measuring social utility than the abolishment of social injustice.

Other books in the series include:
*Kevin J. Callahan, Demonstration Culture: European Socialism and the Second International
*Debbie S. Dougherty, The Reluctant Farmer: An Exploration of Work, Social Class, and the Production of Food
*Amos Kiewe, Confronting Anti-Semitism: Seeking an End to Hateful Rhetoric
*Shane Ralston,  Pragmatic Environmentalism: Toward a Rhetoric of Eco-Justice
*Amardo Rodriguez, Revisioning Diversity in Communication Studies
*Philip C. Wander, Shadow Songs: Reflections on Rhetoric, Culture, & Human Survival

For information on how to submit a manuscript proposal, please contract series editor Omar Swartz or visit the online site for the Troubador book series on social justice.

CFP Comm and Social Justice

Call for Book Manuscripts

Social justice is a powerful political and ideological concept in the 21st century; it has become an increasingly central idea for those trying to gain a fuller understanding of national and international grassroots politics. An implicit assumption of a social justice perspective is that the integrity of any community is violated when some of its members are systematically deprived of their dignity or equality. This assumption often leads to research whose findings are not comfortable for the status quo: governments, institutions, and disciplines. Troubador’s Communication and Social Justice book series maintains that the relevance of scholarship should be judged by the degree to which scholarship advances social democratic values, and that these values must advance by way of valid research that provides honest critique and redescription of those institutions that promote and reify poverty, hierarchy, and/or social inequality. Books in the series recognize that concern for underprivileged and under resourced groups is becoming an increasingly important topic about which to theorize and for which to develop interventions. The goal of this series is to explore the theoretical and practical ways that communication scholars can reconceptualize national and international societies so as to enable inclusive and equitable communities to emerge; to seek to construct communities that protect individual freedom while insuring equality and dignity for everyone. Specifically, this series takes the position that potential contributors are intellectual laborers who view their professional commitments as indistinguishable from their social and political identifications. From varying perspectives, each book published in the series will illustrate the vitality of engaged scholarship and the claim that a scholarship of social justice is not incompatible with more traditional “ivy tower” research. A fundamental assumption of the books is that there is no worthier end for measuring social utility than the abolishment of social injustice.

Other books in the series include:

Rodden, J. (Forthcoming). The intellectual species: Post-Gutenberg prospects.

Wander, P. C. (2014). Shadow Songs: History, Ideology, & Rhetorical Responsibility.

Gorsevski, E. W. (2014). Dangerous women: The rhetoric of the women Nobel peace laureates.

Ralston, S. (2013). Pragmatic environmentalism: Toward a rhetoric of eco-justice.

Dougherty, D. S. The reluctant farmer: An exploration of work, social class, and the production of food.

Kiewe, A. (2011). Confronting anti-Semitism: The rhetoric of hate.

Callahan, K. J. (2010). Demonstration culture: European socialism and the second international, 1889-1914.

Rodriguez, A. (2010). Revisioning diversity in communication studies.

For information on how to submit a manuscript proposal, please contact series editor Omar Swartz (Omar.Swartz AT ucdenver.edu) or visit us online.