Beth Bonniwell Haslett Profile

ProfilesBeth Bonniwell Haslett (Ph.D., University of Minnesota) is Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication at the University of Delaware.

Beth HaslettHer research and teaching interests span organizational and intercultural communication. More specifically, her scholarship focuses on issues of face, cross-cultural communication and the social impact of information and communication technologies. Her current research focuses on differences and similarities across Eastern and Western approaches to communication and cognition, and using Goffman’s concept of Face as an approach to communicative competence.

Dr. Haslett has written four books (Communication: Strategic Action in Context; The Organizational Woman, with F.L.Geis and M.R.Carter; Children Communicating, with W. Samter; and Communicating and Organizing in Context.) This last is her most recent book, and it integrates Giddens’ structuration theory with Goffman’s interaction order and develops a new theoretical perspective, the theory of structurational interaction. From this theoretical framework, it is possible to integrate both the macro- and micro-levels of communication as they contribute to social change, institutional change and globalization, particularly in cross-cultural and organizational settings. Both digital and interpersonal forms of communication are integrated within this framework.

She has also served as chairperson of the Language and Social Interaction Division of the National Communication Association. In addition, Dr. Haslett has served on the editorial boards of Human Communication Research, Communication Monographs, Communication Education, Communication Studies, Journal of Family Communication, Communication Quarterly, Journal of Communication, and Western States Journal of Communication, and reviews for other journals. She has published over 40 articles and book chapters, and presented more than 60 papers at national and international conferences.


Work for CID:
Beth Haslett wrote KC74: Face.