Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication

CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

The Howard Journal of Communications
2012 Special Issue: Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication Mark P. Orbe, Guest Editor Submission Deadline: October 1, 2011

For years, The Howard Journal of Communications (a Taylor & Francis Group publication) has been recognized as a leading journal of scholarship that explores the inextricable relationship between culture and communication. More specifically, it has consistently featured cutting-edge research that brings the communicative experiences of underrepresented group members from the margins to the center of scholarly inquiry. The Howard Journal of Communications continues its commitment to this mission with a 2012 Special Issue dedicated to Theorizing Co-Cultural Communication.

Co-cultural communication refers to the diverse ways that traditionally underrepresented group members negotiate their cultural locations/standpoints in societies where dominant group experiences benefit from societal privilege and institutional power.  By definition, co-cultural communication research works diligently to increase understanding by exploring communication processes from the perspectives of underrepresented group members themselves. This special issue is interested in projects that work to advance the theorizing of co-cultural communication processes.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that explore co-cultural communication processes (based on race/ethnicity, nationality, socio-economic status, gender, disability, spirituality, sexual orientation, and the like) in diverse settings (interpersonal, organizational, small group, intercultural, and mass media). Manuscripts focusing on all forms of co-cultural communication and methodological frameworks are acceptable; however, preference will given to those authors whose work demonstrates how co-cultural understanding transcends the experiences of a single cultural group within a particular setting. Ultimately, the special issue seeks to produce a volume where communication scholars can draw from a variety of conceptual, theoretical and methodological approaches to advance existing knowledge of co-cultural communicative experiences.

The guest editor for the special issue is Mark P. Orbe, Western Michigan University, School of Communication, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI  49009; (269) 387-3132.  All manuscripts must be prepared in accordance to the 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and should contain no more than 7500 total words (including tables, references, endnotes, and appendices). An electronic file of the manuscript (including 200-word abstract), prepared for blind review as a WORD document, and a separate file with title of the manuscript, author contact information, brief author bio, key terms, and manuscript history (if applicable) should be submitted to orbe@wmich.edu AND hjcomm@gmail.com no later than October 1, 2011. Authors are strongly encouraged to review the “Information for Authors” at http://tandf.msgfocus.com/c/15HCwfFS6aghFb2Xbc prior to submitting manuscripts.

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal (DIME)

Routledge: Taylor & Francis Group
Editors:
Zvi Bekerman
Hebrew University
mszviman@mscc.huji.ac.il

Seonaigh A. MacPherson
University of British Columbia

Aims & Scope:
Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal (DIME) – a quarterly peer-reviewed journal focused on critical discourse and research in diaspora, indigenous, and minority education – is dedicated to researching cultural sustainability in a world increasingly consolidating under national, transnational, and global organizations. It aims to draw attention to, and learn from, the many initiatives being conducted around the globe in support of diaspora, indigenous, and minority education, which might otherwise go unnoticed.

DIME invites research from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives that emphasize the centrality of marginal voices and a peripheral gaze, and which draw attention to the complex interrelations between political, economic, historical, and social contexts, as well as the ways in which these various contexts shape educational policies, practices, curricula, and outcomes. The journal welcomes articles that ground theoretical reflections in specific empirical research and case studies of diverse locations and peoples as yet underrepresented within scholarly research and literature, as well as action or participatory research studies of exemplary or “best” practices.

Intended to bridge arbitrary disciplinary boundaries in which such research and theorizing are currently conducted, DIME encourages cutting-edge work from around the world to enhance understanding of the relationships between home and school cultures; educational development, curriculum, and cultural change; local, regional, national, and/or transnational forces or institutions; culture, ethnicity, and gender in identity construction; migration and educational change; and societal attitudes and cultural variation.

Peer Review Policy:
All research articles in this journal have undergone rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymous refereeing by two anonymous referees.

Publication office:
Taylor & Francis, Inc., 325 Chestnut Street, Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106.

Readership:
International researchers, teaching professionals and educators, students, community activists and advocates, and policy and program specialists involved in multicultural education, bilingual education, global/international education, migration, diaspora and immigration studies, and cross-cultural studies, as well as all others who share an interest in educational issues that impact diaspora, indigenous, and minority populations.

Only original work not previously published and not currently under review will be considered. Contributions should be in English and will be reviewed anonymously. Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education receives all manuscript submissions electronically via their ScholarOne Manuscripts website located at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/HDIM. ScholarOne Manuscripts allows for rapid submission of original and revised manuscripts, as well as facilitating the review process and internal communication between authors, editors and reviewers via a web-based platform. For ScholarOne Manuscripts technical support, you may contact them by e-mail or phone support via http://scholarone.com/services/support/. If you have any other requests please contact the journal at mszviman@mscc.huji.ac.il.

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Books available for review

The following books are available for review at the Journal of Language and Social Psychology.  If you are interested in reviewing, please email the book review editor (Jake Harwood: jharwood@u.arizona.edu), including brief indication of which book(s) you wish to review, any relevant qualifications/conflicts of interest, and a mailing address. A copy of the book is provided, and reviews are expected within 3 months of receipt of the book.

Language and sexism (Mills) — Cambridge
A history of communications (Poe) — Cambridge
Emotions in multiple languages (Dewaele) — Palgrave
Anti- and Pro-Social Communication (Kinney & Porhola) — Lang
Cultural processes (Leung et al.) — Cambridge
Conversation and gender (Speer and Stokoe) — Cambridge
English around the world (Schneider) — Cambridge
Dialogue: The mixed game (Weigand) – Benjamins
Social psychology and discourse (McKinlay & McVittie) — Wiley
Variation in indigenous minority languages (Stanford & Preston) — Benjamins
Clinical pragmatics (Cummings) — Cambridge
Sign languages (Brentari) — Cambridge
The social psychology of English as a global language (McKenzie) — Springer
Language, migration, and identity (Goebel) – Cambridge
Investigation in sociohistorical linguistics (Trudgill) — Cambridge
The language of statutes (Solan) – Chicago
Language, gender, and sexual identity (Motschenbacher) — Benjamins
Motivation and second language acquisition (Gardner) — Lang
Predicative minds (Bogdan) – MIT Press
_______________________
Jake Harwood, Professor & Interim Head
Department of Communication
1103 E. University Blvd.
University of Arizona
PO Box 210025
Tucson, AZ 85721-0025
ph: 520-626-8681
fax: 520-621-5504
jharwood@u.arizona.edu
www.u.arizona.edu/~jharwood

Media and Citizenship call for papers

Please note: The deadline for the special issue on media and democracy for the Taiwan Journal of Democracy has been extended until Monday, April 18. The complete call follows below and is attached.

Taiwan Journal of Democracy
Call for Papers: Media and Citizenship Special Issue

Scholars have long noted the need for a well-informed electorate to maintain healthy democracies. Media performances, in many instances, have implications for the quality of democracies and their societies. An established body of scholarship in media studies and elsewhere has addressed such issues as media contribution to democratic governance. Much less empirical research examines connections among media, media systems and citizenship, including the rights, responsibilities and privileges associated with belonging to particular nations or communities, as well as associated values, identities and processes working to reinforce or transform them.

This special issue of the Taiwan Journal of Democracy is an invitation to bridge that gap. As many countries move toward more democratic forms of governance, the articulation of various dimensions of citizenship has import for the quality of democracies, but has not been fully explored in studies of democracy and democratization, as Guillermo O’Donnell has noted (See his lead article in Taiwan Journal of Democracy, Vol.3, No.2, December 2007). We use citizenship in a broad sense here, including formal rights and accompanying responsibilities in terms of a nation-state, but also dimensions reaching into often-overlooked dimensions of citizenship-including civil, social, cultural or environmental, among others-as well as what some have termed the emergence of a global civil society, or post-national citizenship following the spread of globalization.

This call for papers is intended to explore the interface of citizenship with media, building on other work on media and political engagement. Papers here may explore conceptual and analytical bridges to such key notions as agency, identity, deliberation, practice, civic interests and expression, or civic culture, among others. Please note this call is not region specific.

Key questions remain regarding interactions of dimensions and conceptualizations of citizenship with society, including regarding the formation, erosion or transformation of citizenship and citizens. How do media work to explore the limits of citizenship, of belonging or exclusion, of public and private spheres, of diversity among citizens, or in the transformation from non-citizen to citizen, and vice-versa? As Manuel Castells and Silvio Waisbord have asked, as demarcations between states, civil society and their citizens shift, what are the implications for our understandings of citizenship and the role of communication? Peter Dahlgren discussed media’s key roles in terms of shaping components of civic agency and culture; what are the observed cases of those formulations? How do citizens’ encounters with mediated content shape identity formation, public opinion, civic awareness, among others? As citizens struggle to resolve conflicts in democratic, non-democratic or democratizing societies, how does media performance connect? In rapidly transforming technological contexts, what are the implications for articulation or realization of citizenship at various scales?

Guidelines & Timeline
Full-paper proposals of empirical research (maximum 10,000 words, including references, footnotes, tables and figures) will be considered for the special issue. Papers should follow the Journal’s style and writing guidelines and editorial policies, which can be found on its website here (http://www.tfd.org.tw/english/tjd.php). Because of deadline considerations, only English-language manuscripts will be considered. The extended deadline for paper submission is April 18,, 2011. Authors will be notified by July 15, 2011, regarding the outcome of peer reviews. Final revised manuscripts for publication will be due Sept. 15, 2011. The tentative publication date for the issue will be December 2011.

Documents should be sent via email to co-editor Juliet Pinto. A title page including a 150-word abstract, relevant contact information and a brief biological sketch should be sent as a separate file. Manuscripts should include only the working title as a header on each page, and all identifying information should be removed.

Special Issue Co-Editors

Dr. Juliet Pinto
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Journalism & Broadcasting, SJMC
Florida International University
North Miami, FL  33181
(305) 919-4404
juliet.pinto@fiu.edu

Dr. Sallie Hughes
Associate Professor
Dept. of Journalism
School of Communication
University of Miami
Coral Gables, FL  33146
(305) 284-8163
shughes@miami.edu

International discources about audiences

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Discourses about Audiences: International Comparisons
Deadline:   May 1, 2011

We seek proposals from media scholars to study the representations of audiences in non-western societies and pre-modern Europe. We use “western” to indicate culture rather than geography. In that sense, the term contrasts to all societies not based upon Western traditions, including not only “eastern” societies but also societies south of the equator.

We plan to publish the studies in special issues of journals and as an edited book, in multiple languages. We also plan to organize an international conference where the authors will present and discuss their work.

In our books, The Citizen Audience and Audiences and Publics, we have explored representations of audiences and the categories used to characterize them. These explorations have been within the context of modern democracies in Western Europe and North America. In Western discourse, audiences have been variously considered crowds, publics, mass and consumers, active or passive, additive or selective, vulnerable and suggestible or critical and creative, educated or ignorant, high or low brow, and characterized differently on the basis of their presumed race, class, sex and age.

These debates and these categories sometimes have been adopted and applied to audiences in non-Western cultures. The conjoined terms “audiences and publics,” for example, have begun to be used by scholars across the globe. But there is no reason to assume that such Western categories and associations apply, or apply in the same way, in non-western societies. At a time when global and regional media (satellite, television/radio, recording, mobile phone, internet) saturate even remote populations and cultures, we have no comparative empirical studies to reveal what categories are indigenous to individual non-western cultures, and to record  how they differ and change.

Consequently our goal is to bring together research from across the globe, to investigate whether the terms associated with audiences in western Europe and North America actually fit the indigenous discourses on audiences in non-Western cultures. Each culture likely has a different and interesting history. We think that such a comparative study of discourse on media and audiences could bring new insights into global media as well as Western discourse and scholarship on media and audiences, and be of immense value to government policymakers and media practitioners as well. Moreover, it will be an opportunity for non-Western worlds to speak about themselves, unfiltered through Western concepts.

The project will explore specifically non-Western languages and cultures, and as a whole, will compare their discourses on audiences. In this globalized world this will sometimes be a marginal distinction, given the bleeding of Western ideas through borders and cultural boundaries. We would like applicants to go beyond non-Western incorporations of Western terms about audiences that accompanied their adoption of media technology and texts, to explore their discourses on indigenous practices and their audiences. With this foundation, then applicants would investigate how indigenous discourses represent media audiences as these media spread through these societies.

From all applicants, we will select 10-15 scholars to research discourses in their proposed culture and language, looking at these both before and since their contact with Western culture and the spread of twentieth and twenty-first century media. We expect to include:

1. Studies on discourses in major languages of the world, e.g. Chinese, Hindi, Bengali, Arabic, Urdu, etc.,

2. Studies on cultures and languages less integrated into globalization and more remote from Western influence, and

3. A study of a major medieval European culture and language before democracy and publics became associated with audiences.

Applicants should be fluent in the language and generally familiar with the media/audience history of the culture they propose to study. For their research, we wish contributors to study representations in that culture and language, examining its historical development, in whole or part, of discourses as media are introduced into that culture through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with special consideration to the lexicon used to characterize media audiences. Junior as well as senior scholars are welcome, as long as each demonstrates his/her capabilities for this research.

Proposals should be in English and include a preliminary research plan of no more than 3 single-spaced pages, specifying the cultural/linguistic context and describing the plan of research. as well as current vitae of the applicant(s). Send proposals as email attachments to both Butsch@rider.edu and S.Livingstone@lse.ac.uk, no later than May 1, 2011.

We look forward to reading your proposals.

Richard Butsch, Professor of Sociology, American Studies, and Film and Media Studies, Rider University, USA

Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Social Psychology, Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics,  UK

Call for articles – Liminalities

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Liminalities: A Journal of Performance Studies will publish a new recurring section on “The City,” Editor, Daniel Makagon (DePaul University)

The aim of this blind, peer-reviewed section of Liminalities is to explore performance and performativity in urban environments.

Possible topics include:
Movement in the city
New urbanism
Performance and public spaces
Performance and urban architecture
Street art and graffiti
Street theater
Theatre cultures
Cinema and the city
Urban decay
Hipsterism
Gentrification
Urban renewal
Branding
The homeless/unhoused
Food cultures
Neighborhoods
Neighborhood festivals
Block parties
Sports in/and the city
Immigration
Globalization
Green Cities
Urban Tourism
Urban public health

The editor anticipates (at least) the following types of submissions: theoretical essays; ethnographic projects; audio, photographic, video, and web-based projects (or any mix thereof) about urban life and cities; and book reviews.

Please send all materials for this section to: Daniel Makagon (dmakagon@depaul.edu )

Or by mail to:
Daniel Makagon
The City, Liminalities
College of Communication
DePaul University
1 E Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, IL 60614
USA

Empedocles call for papers

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Interpersonal Communication and Social Interaction” Special Issue of Empedocles, guest edited by Pekka Isotalus (University of Tampere) and Owen Hargie (University of Ulster).

There is growing need for a European publication platform for interpersonal communication and social interaction research and theory development. In order to give the European communication research community an opportunity to assess the scope of such a platform, Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication will publish a special guest-edited issue on interpersonal communication and social interaction, which could also be the starting point for a new journal dedicated to this area of research: European Journal of Human Communication.

As guest editors for a special edition of Empedocles to be published in December 2011, we welcome proposals for articles that explore contacts and bonds between people, whether in private or public contexts, whether maintained face-to-face or mediated via communication technologies. The articles can focus on interpersonal relationships; group and team communication; conversational organisation; verbal and nonverbal communication; language and social interaction; intercultural dimensions; public speaking; radio and television performance; rhetoric; argumentation; persuasion and mutual influence; communicative competence and interpersonal skills; ethnography of speaking; and, other related approaches to human social interaction. We encourage qualitative approaches to research, while also encompassing quantitative inquiry. For this special issue, theoretical, evaluative or interpretative studies are especially welcome.

The journal publishes double-blind peer reviewed articles (6,000-8,000 words). Submissions should be sent by email before June 15, 2011, to guest editors Pekka Isotalus (pekka.isotalus@uta.fi) and Owen Hargie (ODW.Hargie@ulster.ac.uk).

Empedocles uses the MHRA referencing system. Please download the notes for contributors for further information.

HJFRT Call for articles

CALL FOR ARTICLES
“A Newsreel of Our Own”: the culture and commerce of local filmed news
Special issue of the Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television.

The international history of the ‘major’ newsreels and their activities in free-market countries has been relatively well studied by film historians. There is also a growing corpus of literature on newsreel production and distribution in ‘closed’ markets that were controlled by authoritarian regimes: “No-Do” in Franco’s Spain, “Luce” in Mussolini’s Italy, “Die Deutsche Wochenschau” in Hitler’s Germany, and several newsreels in the Soviet Union. However, there is a lack of comparative research on local producers’ attempts to break the hegemony of international newsreel companies.

Many small countries without a national film industry or centralized newsreel production were worried about the creeping cultural and economic imperialism (particularly from the United States, Great Britain, and France) that foreign-made filmed news represented. Individual businessmen and organized interest groups (political parties, cultural organizations) therefore tried to create newsreels of their own, which were to ’emancipate’ or ‘enlighten’ their own people. Most of these newsreels were produced without substantial government funding and therefore expensive, which made it easy for international companies to undersell them. In addition, local production companies typically did not have a large catalogues of feature films at their disposal, making it difficult or impossible to sell their newsreels as part of a larger distribution package. These conditions often doomed local newsreels to a short existence and has relegated them to footnotes in film history. 

This thematic issue of the HJFRT will explore the history of locally-produced newsreels. The focus is on the initiatives of small companies, organizations and communities. State produced newsreels, funded or made obligatory by political regimes, will not be included. Submissions are welcomed on the commercial aspects (financing, production, and distribution) of local newsreels as well as on their structure and content. Of particular interest is the extent to which local newsreels did (or did not) model themselves after their international competitors. The substance of the newsreels is also of special interest, particularly the ways in which those newsreels tried (or not) to offer ‘other’ kinds of news. Also welcome are analyses on the political, social, and cultural discourses surrounding those newsreels.

If you would like to be considered for inclusion in the issue, please send a short abstract by 4 April 2011, where you summarize your contribution. Please also include a short CV and a selected list of publications. The editors of this theme issue will get in touch with everyone before 4 May 2011 and invite some authors to submit a complete manuscript. Articles, ideally between 6000 and 8000 words (including notes and references), should be sent to the editors by 3 October 2011. Accepted and revised contributions will be due by 6 February 2012, with the issue scheduled to appear in the second half of 2012.

Please send your proposals to Daniel Biltereyst (daniel.biltereyst@ugent.be), to Brett Bowles (bbowles@albany.edu) and to Roel Vande Winkel (roel.vandewinkel@ua.ac.be).

Call for papers: National journalism traditions

CALL FOR PAPERS
Special issue of Medijska istraživanja/Media Research:
International Journalistic Ideology in the Context of National Traditions of Journalism

Editor of the journal: Prof. Dr. Nada Zgrabljiæ Rotar (University of Zadar, Croatia)

Guest Editors of the Special Issue: Prof. Dr. Melita Poler Kovaèiè & Prof. Dr. Karmen Erjavec (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia)

Editors of Medijska istraživanja/Media Research have decided to devote a special issue (2011, Vol. 17, No. 1-2) to the following topics:

In journalism studies literature, some of the most crucial journalistic themes—such as autonomy, ethics, and professional knowledge—have often been researched as the criteria of journalism professionalization and a part of a common (or at least dominant) journalistic ideology. Questions related to these topics have been posed within discussions about the wider crisis of journalism, i.e., the crisis of journalism’s foundations and goals, and its theory and practice. Although several authors have (optimistically) argued that some common or even universal grounds exist within journalism, others have pointed to differences and disagreements, which are reflected in different ways of understanding and practicing journalism in various parts of the world. Numerous research studies have confirmed so far that the systems and traditions of journalism vary, while others have been persistent in emphasizing commonalities. Changes in media environment, processes of globalization and multiculturalism, scaling down of national borders, moving news to the Internet, an increasingly international (multinational) audience, and other phenomena relevant to the present time point to the need for reflection about what (if anything) journalism and journalists around the world have in common. These changes make us reconsider some old questions about the meaning and definition of quality journalism, placing them in a new light. Considering the diversity of approaches to journalism, can we speak about a common (or a dominant) journalistic ideology and/or an international news culture? Is journalism really so largely dependent on the broader (historical, social, and cultural) context that it is virtually senseless to search for universal values and common understandings of what constitutes journalism? Does journalism, due to the new and the issues mentioned above, need to strive for universal and internationally accepted definitions of its constituent elements? Should the lack of consensus on what journalism is (or should be) in all parts of the world be accepted as a fact and instead be accompanied by learning about other cultures, systems, and traditions of journalism by promoting understanding and respect for difference?

Authors included in this special issue of Medijska istraživanja/Media Research should consider these questions as a starting-point for their research. It is strongly recommended that the authors proceed from journalistic traditions in their own countries, do original research, and then discuss it in a wider context of (presumably) international news culture and journalistic ideology. Comparative analyses are also very welcome as well as theoretical reflections about the issues described above.

Interested authors should submit abstracts in the English language (200 to 250 words) to both editors ( melita.poler-kovacic@fdv.uni-lj.si & karmen.erjavec@fdv.uni-lj.si) by March 1st, 2011. The authors will be notified about whether their abstracts meet the criteria until March 15th, 2011.

The deadline for submission of full articles in the English language and up to 7000 words will be June 15, 2011. After reading the submissions, the editors will decide which of them will be rejected immediately and which will be sent for review to two reviewers. The deadline for submitting final revised articles will be September 1st, 2011.

Information about the journal, including guidelines for authors, can be found on the journal’s site.

U Cal Press Book competition

INTERNATIONAL BOOK COMPETITION

The University of California Press in association with the Center for a Public Anthropology is sponsoring an international competition that awards a formal, publishing contract for the best book proposal submitted — independent of whether the author has completed (or even started) the proposed manuscript. The winner will receive, in addition to a formal book contract from the University of California Press, a five thousand dollar advance. The deadline is March 1, 2011.

If you are interested in the University of California Press Competition, the book contract and the five thousand dollar advance, please visit this link.

Dr. Rob Borofsky
Director, Center for a Public Anthropology
Co-Editor, California Series in Public Anthropology