CFP Roles of Communication on a Regional Conflict

Journal of Asian Pacific Journal (JAPC) Special Issue Call for Papers

The Roles of Communication on a Regional Conflict: Antipathy, Nationalism, and Conflicts in Territorial Disputes among China, Japan, and South Korea

Submissions are encouraged from scholars that use different theoretical and empirical approaches to the special issue of Journal of Asian Pacific Communication on the role of communication (e.g. legal, diplomatic, and public discourses) in territorial disputes among China, Japan, and South Korea. Territorial disputes between China and Japan over Diaoyu (Chinese) or Senkaku (Japanese) island and between Japan and South Korea over the Dokdo (Korea) or Takeshima (Japanese) island have escalated particularly in recent years and given rise to concerns about peace and security in the region. The special issue will examine the roles of communication and discourse on their political, cultural, historical, and economical aspects of the territorial disputes with a focus on the key internal and external factors shaping current and future relations. The articles will examine communication and discourse in institutional and political settings, i.e., in and around organizations, in the media, and on the internet. They will focus on how use of language and non-verbal symbolic systems in specific, esp. institutional, communicative contexts, including face-to-face diplomatic interactions/conversations, news release, and popular cultural texts such as films, music, animation, television drama, etc. impact the territorial disputes.

(1) News Coverage on the Disputes: Articles may examine how news media cover the disputes and the accompanying debates on international and domestic levels by conducting content (quantitative) or textural (qualitative) analysis of newspaper articles or broadcasting news contents in two territorial disputes among three nations (or comparative studies). They may also examine how media represent conflict and its potential impact on the audience.

(2) Public Opinion and Propaganda: Although territorial disputes are one of the most fraught issues among states, how public opinion and official and unofficial propaganda on territorial disputes varies within states and what explains the variation are often overlooked. Some articles may examine the dynamics of messages and see how public prioritizes and processes nationalistic, historical, and economic considerations over such disputes. They may hypothesize, for example, that younger generations are more likely to support some level of compromise while older generations would take a more a hawkish stance.

(3) Political and Diplomatic Communication: There are inevitable political aspects in disputed territories. The role of the U.S. can be an explosive force in these disputes. Although the U.S. may maintain the neutrality in the territorial disputes among three nations, the U.S. concerns that China’s muscle in the region could escalate the conflicts with neighboring Vietnam, Malaysia, and Philippine and Japan. The U.S. may support their territorial disputes in order to counter China’s regional hegemonic ambition. The papers may examine rhetorical aspects of political communication (emails, news releases, press conferences, legal action threats, languages of peace and conflicts) in these disputes.

(4) Role of Social Media and Bloggers: Angry and reasonable participants of social media have escalated various international conflicts including the territorial disputes. Papers may analyze social media, internet, and cyber warfare on the disputes among three nations and see how these disputes are mediated, produced, received, and reconstituted.

(5) Role of Popular Cultural Texts: These disputes have been constructed and deconstructed through comics, television dramas, films, dance, theaters, and music in three nations. They are also largely consumed and shared in internet. Papers may explore how these popular cultural texts can personalize and frame the disputes and make the readers to frame of references in their opinions on the topic. Or analyze the texts based on power, ideology, and discourses.

All manuscripts will be reviewed as a cohort for this special issue. Manuscripts must be submitted online. All submissions will go through a regular double-blind review process and follow the standard norms and processes. The deadline for submissions is September 30, 2016. Submissions should be emailed to Eungjun Min.

Author: Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, the Director of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, manages this website.

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