VIEW open access e-journal

The number of peer-reviewed, open access electronic journals is increasing, helping to share knowledge across national boundaries. The newest is View, which, given their focus on visual content, is multi-media as well. Their editorial policy states: “This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.” I could not agree more. Information about the current issue follows.

EUscreenXL presents issue 3 of VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture: European Television Memories

VIEW, the Journal of European Television History and Culture is the first peer-reviewed, multi-media and open access e-journal in the field of European television history and culture. It offers an international platform for outstanding academic research and archival reflection on television as an important part of our European cultural heritage. The journal is proud to present its third issue: European Television Memories. It has been guest-edited by Jérôme Bourdon and Berber Hagedoorn and is freely available.

In the context of the fast development of media studies, the third issue of VIEW highlights debates around the moving borders of national memories, fostered by television in the context of European history. The articles in this issue focus on the contribution of European television researchers, covering all three areas of media studies: production, text and reception.

Table of Contents

Editorial – Jérôme Bourdon,  Berber Hagedoorn

DISCOVERIES

– ‘Remembering Our First TV Set’. Personal Memories as a Source for Television Audience History – Cecilia Penati
– “It’s just so hard to bring it to mind”: The Significance of ‘Wallpaper’ in the Gendering of Television Memory Work – Hazel Collie
– Martin Luther in Primetime. Television Fiction and Cultural Memory Construction in Cold War Germany – Stewart Anderson
– The Production of Czechoslovakia´s Most Popular Television Serial ‘The Hospital on the Outskirts’ and its Post-1989 Repeats – Petr Bednařík
– Parallel Stories, Differentiated Histories. Exploring Fiction and Memory in Spanish and Portuguese Television – José Carlos Rueda Laffond, Carlota Coronado Ruiz, Catarina Duff Burnay, Susana Díaz Pérez, Amparo Guerra Gómez, Rogério Santos
– Looking for What You Are Looking for: A Media Researcher’s First Search in a Television Archive – Jasmijn Van Gorp

EXPLORATIONS

– Television as a Hybrid Repertoire of Memory. New Dynamic Practices of Cultural Memory in the Multi-Platform Era – Berber Hagedoorn
– Why Should We Study Socialist Commercials? – Anikó Imre
– Window to the West: Memories of Watching Finnish Television in Estonia During the Soviet Period – Annika Lepp, Mervi Pantti
– The Life and Afterlife of a Socialist Media Friend. On the Longterm Cultural Relevance of the Polish TV Series ‘Czterdziestolatek’ – Kinga S. Bloch
– Chronology and Ideology. Temporal Structuring in Israeli Historical Documentary Series – Bosmat Garami
– Great Escapes from the Past. Memory and Identity in European Transnational Television News – Andreas Widholm
– Memory, Television and the Making of the BBC’s ‘The Story of Wales’ – Steve Blandford, Ruth McElroy

VIEW is published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Maastricht University and Royal Holloway University of London. It is supported by the EUscreenXL project, the European Television History Network and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research.

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Author: Center for Intercultural Dialogue

Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz, the Director of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, manages this website.

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