Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication

PARGC 2014 Symposium
The Revolutionary Public Sphere: Contention, Communication and Culture in the Arab Uprisings

The Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication is proud to present the Inaugural PARGC Symposium:
The Revolutionary Public Sphere: Contention, Communication and Culture in the Arab Uprisings
Thursday, April 10, 2014
Annenberg School for Communication
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

The popular rebellions that have swept Arab countries since December 2010 have spawned an active field of insurrectionary cultural production. Scholars from around the world will gather at the Annenberg School for PARGC’s inaugural symposium. Putting primary sources in dialogue with theory, we seek to understand aesthetic experimentation and stylistic innovation in this revolutionary public sphere. Together, we will strive to shed light on the ways in which various revolutionary and counter-revolutionary activists and regimes have attracted, upheld, and directed popular attention to themselves and to their opponents. Our exploration of contention, communication and culture in the Arab uprisings will yield conceptual tools to understand revolutionary public spheres at large.

Speakers & Topics:
Yakein Abdelmagid (Duke University): Independent music production in Cairo
Omar Al-Ghazzi (University of Pennsylvania): The symbol of Omar al-Mukhtar in the Libyan uprising
Anahi Alviso-Marino (Université Paris-1 Panthéon-Sorbonne): Contentious politics and street art in Yemen
Walter Armbrust (University of Oxford): Egypt’s June 30th rebellion as social drama
Donatella Della Ratta (University of Pennsylvania): Syrian internet memes and the politics of cultural (re)production
Tarek El-Ariss (University of Texas, Austin): Literary writing and violence in the Arab Spring
Nouri Gana (University of California, Los Angeles): Rap music in the Tunisian revolution
Nour Halabi (University of Pennsylvania): Hezbollah logos and carnivalesque humor in revolutionary times
Adel Iskandar (Georgetown University): The politics of memes in revolutionary Egypt
Marc Owen Jones (University of Durham): Satire and social media in the Bahrain uprising
Amal Khalaf (Serpentine Galleries): The Pearl Roundabout and public space in Bahrain
Shayna Silverstein (University of Pennsylvania): Syrian revolutionary music and the politics of memory
Jakob Skovgaard-Petersen (University of Copenhagen): Revolutionary and Islamic content in Ramadan musalsalat (long TV drama)
Leila Tayeb (Northwestern University): Utopian impulses in Libyan revolutionary performances
Edward Ziter (New York University): The anecdotal in Syrian oppositional theatre

Contact:
Marina Krikorian
Project Coordinator
Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication
The Annenberg School for Communication
University of Pennsylvania