CFP Humanities in the Public Square Grants

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has announced a new grant opportunity, called “Humanities in the Public Square,” that will put humanities scholars in direct dialogue with the public on some of the most pressing issues of today– through public forums, community programs, and the development of educational resources.

This new grant opportunity is part of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ agency-wide initiative The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.

The NEH Humanities in the Public Square program will award grants of up to $300,000 to institutions for projects that incorporate:
– a public forum, to be held in May 2016, that engages humanities practitioners in discussion with a public audience about a theme of contemporary significance;
– public programs, commencing in spring of 2016, that would use creative formats, such as book or film discussion programs, local history projects, scholarly talks or courses for lifelong learners, to engage the public or specific audiences in sustained conversations on a chosen theme;
– the creation and dissemination of educational resources that will extend the reach of the content developed for the public forum and public programs through digital resources or curricular materials for use by use by teachers, students and lifelong learners.

Application guidelines and a list of FAQs for the Humanities in the Public Square program are available online. The application deadline for the initial cycle of Humanities in the Public Square grants is June 24, 2015.

NEH Creates New “Public Scholar” Grant Program

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced a new grant opportunity that encourages the publication of nonfiction books that apply serious humanities scholarship to subjects of general interest and appeal.

The new NEH Public Scholar awards support well-researched books in the humanities conceived and written to reach a broad readership. Books supported through this program might present a narrative history, tell the stories of important individuals, analyze significant texts, provide a synthesis of ideas, revive interest in a neglected subject, or examine the latest thinking on a topic. Most importantly, they should open up important and appealing subjects for wider audiences by presenting significant humanities topics in a way that is accessible to general readers.

The NEH Public Scholar program represents a long-term commitment at NEH to encourage scholarship in the humanities for general audiences. The grant program forms part of a new agency-wide initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.

The Public Scholar program is open to both independent scholars and individuals affiliated with scholarly institutions. It offers a stipend of $4,200 per month for a period of six to twelve months. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a twelve-month period. Applicants must have previously published a book or monograph with a university or commercial press, or articles and essays that reach a wide readership.

Application guidelines and a list of F.A.Q.’s for the Public Scholar program are available online. The application deadline for the first cycle of Public Scholar grants is March 3, 2015.

Bridging cultures grant

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invites proposals for projects that advance the role of the humanities at a community college through curriculum and faculty development on the theme of Bridging Cultures.

NEH expects to award seven to nine grants of up to $120,000 each.

NEH Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges projects create opportunities for community college faculty members to study together while improving their capacity to teach the humanities; enhance or develop areas of need in an institution’s humanities programs; and give community college faculty access to humanities resources through partnerships with other educational or cultural institutions.

Funded projects will:
*draw on sound humanities scholarship related to the theme of Bridging Cultures,
*engage participating faculty in shared readings of important humanities texts,
*involve humanities scholars with appropriate expertise,
*result in improvements in the quality of humanities instruction at a community college or community college system, and
*disseminate widely the results of their work.

Projects must involve a partnership in the planning and implementation of the project between a community college or system and another educational or cultural institution, such as a college or university, museum, research library, or professional association.

Bridging Cultures is an agency-wide initiative that encourages exploration of the ways in which cultures from around the globe, as well as the myriad subcultures within America’s borders, have influenced American society. With the aim of revitalizing intellectual and civic life through the humanities, NEH welcomes proposals that enhance understanding of diverse countries, peoples, and cultural and intellectual traditions worldwide. Applications might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest. In connection with a focus on civic discourse, projects might explore the role of women in America’s civic life as well as the civic role of women in other cultures and regions of the world.

We strongly encourage interested applicants to contact us at (202) 606-8380 or bccc AT neh.gov to consult with a program officer about their proposals.

Guidelines will be available at www.neh.gov/grants/education/bridging-cultures-community-colleges in early May. The application deadline is August 27, 2013.

For information about previously funded proposals in this program, please visit www.neh.gov/divisions/education/bridging-cultures-programs.

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NEH Fellowships-Bridging Cultures

NEH Call for Fellowship Applications-Due May 1, 2012

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources in the humanities. Projects may be at any stage of development.

The Fellowships program welcomes projects that respond to NEH’s Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans’ understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest.

All applications will be given equal consideration in accordance with the program’s evaluation criteria, whether or not they respond to the Bridging Cultures initiative.

View the NEH call for applications.

NEH grants: Bridging Cultures

National Endowment of the Humanities announces:

“The Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program supports projects that examine international and transnational themes in the humanities through documentary films. These projects are meant to spark Americans’ engagement with the broader world by exploring one or more countries and cultures outside of the United States. Proposed documentaries must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship….

Projects are strongly encouraged to demonstrate international collaboration by enlisting scholars based both in the United States and abroad, and/or by working with an international media team. Such collaborations should bring broader cross-cultural perspectives to the proposed topics.”

Details available from NEH grants site where original announcement was posted.