Indigenous Languages through Google Earth

Applied ICDContributing to the United Nations 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages, a Google Earth project, Celebrating Indigenous Languages, brings attention to specific languages spoken around the world by letting 55 people share examples of greetings, sayings, and stories in their native language.

“A shared language is one of the most important connections among groups of people. Not only does it create a sense of kinship, but it promotes a shared worldview through unique vocabulary and traditional sayings and songs. Yet many of the world’s 7,000 languages are in danger of disappearing; according to the United Nations 2,680 Indigenous languages are at risk. Indigenous communities around the globe are working to preserve and revitalize their languages by teaching them to future generations and sharing them with non-Indigenous speakers.”

Further reading:

Katz, Brigid. (15 August 2019). At-risk indigenous languages spotlighted on new Google Earth platform. Smithsonian.com

Šopova, Jasmina. (2019). Indigenous languages and knowledge. The UNESCO Courier, January-March 2019.

International Year of Indigenous Languages

Resources in ICD“ width=2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages. Indigenous languages matter for social, economic and political development, peaceful coexistence and reconciliation in our societies. Yet many of them are in danger of disappearing. Every 2 weeks, the world loses an indigenous language and with it an entire cultural & intellectual heritage.

“An International Year is an important cooperation mechanism dedicated to raising awareness of a particular topic or theme of global interest or concern, and mobilizing different players for coordinated action around the world. In 2016, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages, based on a recommendation by the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. At the time, the Forum said that 40 per cent of the estimated 6,700 languages spoken around the world were in danger of disappearing.  The fact that most of these are indigenous languages puts the cultures and knowledge systems to which they belong at risk. 

In addition, indigenous peoples are often isolated both politically and socially in the countries they live in, by the geographical location of their communities, their separate histories, cultures, languages and traditions. And yet, they are not only leaders in protecting the environment, but their languages represent complex systems of knowledge and communication and should be recognized as a strategic national resource for development, peace building and reconciliation. They also foster and promote unique local cultures, customs and values which have endured for thousands of years. Indigenous languages add to the rich tapestry of global cultural diversity. Without them, the world would be a poorer place.”

from: About IYIL 2019.

CFP Indigenous Languages

“PublicationCall for submissions to Language, for papers on indigenous languages, for 2019.

The United Nations has declared 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages. In recognition of this, Language is encouraging submissions dealing with research on any aspect of Indigenous languages. This call is very broad – articles in any area of linguistics will be considered – phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, computational linguistics, language policy, historical linguistics, methodologies, revitalization, and so on. Papers will go through the normal review procedure.