Janice Hume

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Janice Hume (Ph.D., 1997, M.A., 1995, B.J., 1981, University of Missouri School of Journalism) is an associate professor of journalism in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Georgia. Her research focuses on journalism history, particularly how it relates to collective memory and the social construction of death. She has written two books, Obituaries in American Culture (University Press of Mississippi, 2000) and Journalism in a Culture of Grief (with Carolyn Kitch, Routledge, 2007), as well as numerous journal articles published in Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Journalism & Communication Monographs, Journalism History, American Journalism, Journal of Popular Culture, the Review of Communication and Omega: Journal of Death and Dying. She is Research Chair of the American Journalism Historians Association and formerly served as head of the History Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

NOTE:
One of the goals of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue is to help researchers connect with one another across international boundaries. This is one of a series of posts describing a particular researcher, focusing on research interests. Click on the Category term “Researcher profile” (bottom left of any page on the site) to view all profiles posted to the site. If you are a Communication researcher and would like to be profiled on the site, send information to intercult.dialogue@gmail.com

Simon Harrison

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Simon Harrison

I joined the HumTec Center (RWTH Aachen University, Germany) in Fall of 2010 to study and develop communication in industry. With a focus on gesture, I examined how factory workers communicate along production lines in noisy environments and I evaluated the impact of different strategies on productivity levels, overall equipment efficiency, and worker morale. The goal was to identify and develop visual communication strategies that increase the efficiency of a production line by reducing response times and minimizing mis-communication. Conducting this research within the Natural Media & Engineering group provided the opportunity to investigate the cognitive-semiotics of shared gesture systems and to measure the efficiency of communication strategies in a lab setting. My project Manufacturing Communication was funded by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

I am currently (2013) a lecturer in applied linguistics at the University of Nottingham in Ningbo (China). I teach courses in different aspects of language and linguistics, predominately to Chinese students although some classes are mixed with international students from other areas of Asia, the UK, and North America. In my research, I am interested in the role of gesture in language, cognition, and culture, which makes working in an international environment so fascinating. Previously I have studied how English speakers express negation multimodally, and now i hope to compare my findings cross-culturally with the goal of understanding why gesture is universal yet culturally marked. I study gestures in different face-to-face communication contexts (e.g., conversation, workplace), analyse their link to language at different levels (utterance, discourse), and use my findings as a way to shed light on the conceptual, multimodal and interactive nature of language.

Michael D. Slater

RESEARCHER PROFILE

Michael D. Slater (Ph.D. Stanford University, 1988, MPA New York University, 1982, BA Columbia University, 1974) is Social and Behavioral Science Distinguished Professor at the School of Communication, Ohio State University.  His research includes theory-building efforts in message effects, persuasion, narrative influences, and dynamic processes of media selection, media effects, and maintenance of personal and social identity, with a particular interest in health outcomes, with over 130 publications in these and related areas. He has served as principal investigator of NIH-funded studies of community-based substance abuse prevention efforts, alcohol-related risk perceptions and media coverage, and responses to alcohol advertisements and warnings (representing over $12 million in funded research grants). He also has served as chair of the International Communication Association’s Health Communication Division and was founding chair of the Coalition for Health Communication.

NOTE:
One of the goals of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue is to help researchers connect with one another across international boundaries. This is one of a series of posts describing a particular researcher, focusing on research interests. Click on the Category term “Researcher profile” (bottom left of any page on the site) to view all profiles posted to the site. If you are a Communication researcher and would like to be profiled on the site, send information to intercult.dialogue@gmail.com