Patricia O. Covarrubias

Researcher ProfilesPatricia O. Covarrubias (Ph.D. University of Washington, 1999) is Associate Professor and Director of the M.A. Program in the Department of Communication and Journalism at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Patricia Covarrubias

My previous careers include work as a broadcast journalist for KCRA-TV (NBC affiliate in Sacramento, California) and owner of OCELOTL, a consulting company providing presentation skills to US and Japanese business persons. My academic research focuses on understanding and describing how local cultures influence people’s ways of communicating and vice versa, and on describing how culturally-grounded communicative practices reflect and create a unique life for groups of people.  Ultimately, I am interested in the influence of culture and cultural diversity in the activities and events of everyday life across a variety of contexts.   My research goals include contributing to the ethnography of communication and to language and social interaction approaches.  Further, my aim is to contribute to cultural and intercultural communication, metaphors as communication, cultural/intercultural communication in health contexts, and the much understudied communicative aspect of communicative silence.  In whatever context, my professional passions and research impetus are driven by my personal ideals for achieving social inclusivity and justice, improving institutional (and other) contexts, more peaceful living, richer multicultural experience, and greater benefits from our human socio-cultural distinctiveness.

In the area of communicative silence I am interested in exploring silences as “generative” rather than “consumptive” enactments.  For example, I have studied silence as a generative means for perpetuating, particularizing, and/or protecting culture.  To this research I would like to add uses of silence to enact social resistance for purposes of emancipation.  Also, I am interested in studying the kinds of social worlds people create when competing culturally situated silences collide.  For example, using American Indian examples, I have taken a critical look at silence enactments that reveal what I call “discriminatory silence” within the context of the college classroom.  In future work, I hope to explore the silencing of women who practice orthodox religions, particularly to not exclusively, in college contexts.  The study of communicative silence is a much under-studied aspect in the field of communication, among other academic fields, and my goal is to contribute to centralizing its importance in studies about human communication.

My past research includes ethnographic investigation of the ways of speaking of native Mexican construction workers and the ways they use pronominal address to create interpersonal webs that in turn enabled them to achieve workplace cooperation.  This work was the focus of my doctoral dissertation, which subsequently was published as a book under the title, Culture, Communication, and Cooperation: Interpersonal Relations and Pronominal Address in a Mexican Organization.

In 2014-2015 I was one of nine professors selected for the first ever Teaching Fellows program at UNM. As part of my commitment to this program I am studying some unexplored reasons why so many Latino students drop out of college at undergraduate and graduate levels. Using double bind theory I am looking at potentially contradictory messages about college within Latino families. This project also involves designing creative writing assignments to help students manage their double bind realities and persist in accomplishing their goals of graduating from college.

Another current research project involves problematizing the concepts of respect and respeto (respect in Spanish) as they are understood in the applied context of immigration discourses. This study argues that respect and respeto are not necessarily equivalent and, thus, serve as loci for sociocultural misunderstandings and alienation. Because my research commitments embrace continuing work with Mexican/Hispanic/Latina(o)/Chicana(o) ways of communicating, potential new directions consist of inquiry into the emotional impact of undocumented immigration on behalf of Mexican women.  This project would help address the complicated impact of a contemporary social problem that affects the health, health care, and clinical practices enacted in New Mexican communities.

Publications & Other Productivity
Book

Covarrubias, P. (2002 Culture, communication, and cooperation: Interpersonal relations and pronominal address in a Mexican organization, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Boulder, CO. (Soft cover edition 2005)

Articles

Covarrubias, P., & Windchief, S. (2009) Silences in Stewardship: Some American Indian College Students Examples.  The Howard Journal of Communications, 20, 4, 1-20.

Covarrubias, P. (2008). Masked Silence Sequences: Hearing Discrimination in the College Classroom. Communication, Culture & Critique, 1, 3, 227-252.

Covarrubias, P. (2007). (Un)biased in Western theory: Generative silence in American Indian communication. Communication Monographs, 74, 2, 265-271.

Philipsen, G., Aoki, E., Castor, T., Coutu, L., Covarrubias, P., Jabs, L., Kane, M., & Winchatz, M. (1997). Reading Ella Cara Deloria’s Waterlily for cultured speech. Iowa Journal of Communication, 29, 31-49. (order of authorship beyond Philipsen was selected at random)

Chapters in edited volumes:

Covarrubias Baillet, P.O. (2009). The Ethnography of Communication. In Littlejohn, S. and K. Foss (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Communication Theory (pp. 355-360). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Covarrubias Baillet, P.O. (2009). Speech Codes Theory. In Littlejohn, S. and K. Foss (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Communication Theory (pp. 918-924). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Covarrubias, P. (2005). Homemade talk: Language, identity, and other Mexican legacies for a son’s intercultural competence. In Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz (Ed.), From generation to generation: Maintaining cultural identity over time (pp. 29-47). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Philipsen, G., Coutu, L. M., & Covarrubias, P. (2005). Speech Codes Theory: Revision, Restatement, and Response to Criticisms. In William Gudykunst (Ed.), Theorizing about communication and culture. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. (order of authorship beyond Philipsen was selected at random)

Covarrubias, P. (2000). Of endearment and other terms of address: A Mexican perspective. In M. W. Lustig and J. Koester (Eds.), AmongUS:  Essays on identity, belonging, and intercultural competence.  New York: Longman.

Other

Covarrubias, P. (January 2006). The findings from my invited research presentation, “Defining success: Overhauling our assumptions,” were included in the published conference proceedings, Redefining Student Success: The Challenges and Implications of Extending Access, published by The College Board.

Covarrubias, P., & Turner, M. (Spring 2006). Cultural Codes in Communication, a video production. This video produced on DVD, conceived by Patricia Covarrubias and produced by UNM undergraduate student Mike Turner, served as promotional and teaching tool at a communication codes conference at the University of Washington in May 2006.

Todd L. Sandel Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesTodd Sandel (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Macau and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication.

He was a Fulbright Scholar to Taiwan 2007-2008, and in 2015 authored the book, Brides on Sale: Taiwanese Cross Border Marriages in a Globalizing Asia, for which he received the “Outstanding Book Award” from the International & Intercultural Division of the National Communication Association (NCA). Sandel has served as Chair of the Language & Social Interaction Division of NCA, President of the Association for Chinese Communication Studies, and Secretary of the Language & Social Interaction (LSI) Division of the International Communication Association (ICA). The paper, “Unpacking and describing interaction on Chinese WeChat: A methodological approach,” co-authored with his students, was awarded the “Top Paper Award” from LSI of ICA in 2018.

His research interests include intercultural communication, Chinese social media, language and social interaction, identity formation, and the ethnography of communication. More recent work, involving the study of affordances of social media, especially in Chinese contexts, has been published in the Journal of Pragmatics, Chinese Journal of Communication, Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, Information Development, and China Media Research. He is also conducting research with students and colleagues in such countries as Indonesia, Japan, and Bhutan.

Select Publications

Sandel, T. L., Ju, B., Ou, C. Y., Wangchuk, D., & Duque, M. (2019). Unpacking and describing interaction on Chinese WeChat: A methodological approach. Journal of Pragmatics, 143, 228-241.

Sandel, T. L., Buttny, R., Varghese, M. (2019). Online interaction across three contexts: An analysis of culture and technological affordances. Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, 48(1), 52-71.

Sandel, T. L. & Ju, B. (forthcoming). Social media, culture, and communication. In J. Oetzel & J. Nussbaum (Eds.) The Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Communication. Oxford University Press.

Ju, B., Sandel, T. L., & Thinyane, H. (in press). WeChat use of Mainland Chinese dual migrants in daily border crossing. Chinese Journal of Communication.

Ju, B., Sandel, T. L., & Fitzgerald, R. (In press). Understanding Chinese internet and social media: The innovative and creative affordances of technology, language and culture. In Marcel Burger (Ed.) Se Mettre en Scène en Ligne’ (Presenting Oneself Online). Cahiers de l’Institut de linguistique et des sciences du langage, No. 58. Lausanne, Switzerland: University of Lausanne.

Anne Kankaanranta Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesAnne Kankaanranta is Senior University Lecturer of Organizational Communication at the Department of Management Studies of Aalto University School of Business (Aalto BIZ) in Helsinki, Finland.

Her PhD is in Applied Linguistics (University of Jyväskylä, Finland). In addition, she has an MSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Vaasa School of Economics and an Executive MBA from the Helsinki School of Economics (since 1 Jan 2011 Aalto BIZ).

Kankaanranta’s main research interests focus on the concept of ‘corporate language’, identity and multilingualism in the global workplace. In particular, her long-time interest has been the use of English as shared language in business (English as Business Lingua Franca, BELF) Her research has been published in, e.g., Journal of Management Studies, Multilingua, Corporate Communications, International Journal of Business Communication, Public Relations Review, and IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication.

She has worked as a researcher in projects funded by the Academy of Finland examining communication and language use in newly merged Finnish-Swedish companies and communication as business know-how of internationally operating companies. Currently Kankaanranta is involved in investigating Englishization of global knowledge work and the use of English as an academic lingua franca in a Russian business school.

She has worked as a visiting researcher/lecturer  at the University of Michigan, USA; Southampton, UK; and Aarhus, Denmark; with shorter scholarly visits to, e.g., WU Vienna University of Economics and Business; Takachiho University, Japan; NHH Norwegian School of Economics; and Ural State University of Economics, Russia.

Kankaanranta has been a member of the Association for Business Communication since 1996 and serves the organization on the Editorial Boards of both the International Journal of Business Communication and Business and Professional Communication Quarterly.

Christine Develotte Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesChristine Develotte is a researcher in applied linguistics. She is currently a professor of Communication at the Ecole Normale Supérieure-INRP in Lyon and a member of the ICAR research lab.

For the last ten years her main research interests have been linked to computer-mediated communication (CMC). Her research includes two aspects: the semio-linguistic aspect of online communication and the social aspect, (focusing on the analysis of human behavior). Since 2002, the data have been taken mostly from fieldwork conducted in classrooms where distance learning and teaching interactions have been emphasized, particularly through her project Le français en (première) ligne. More recently she has been studying online multimodal conversation through desktop videoconferencing tools, examining gestures and mimicry as well as oral and written communication.

Spécialiste d’analyse du discours et intéressée par les questions associées au champ de l’interculturel, c’est par une approche discursive qu’elle traite des comparaisons culturelles médiatiques par exemple. En ce moment, elle est engagée dans une recherche européenne centrée sur les médias sociaux et étudie (avec Anthippi Potolia et Fred Dervin) leurs représentations dans différents journaux gratuits européens.

Leena Louhiala-Salminen Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesLeena Louhiala-Salminen is Professor and  Program Director of the Master’s Program in Corporate Communication at the Aalto University School of Business (AaltoBIZ) in Helsinki, Finland.

Her PhD is in Applied Linguistics (University of Jyväskylä, Finland). In addition, she has a Licentiate degree in English philology (University of Jyväskylä), an MSc in Economics and Business Administration from the Helsinki School of Economics (current Aalto University School of Business) and studies in communication (University of Helsinki).

Louhiala-Salminen’s main research interests include the various genres of business communication, the use of English as the business lingua franca, and corporate communication in international contexts. Her PhD focused on the notion of genre in business communication, with a particular emphasis on the generic qualities of the business fax. She has worked as researcher and project director in two major research projects funded by the Academy of Finland. The first one examined communication and language use in newly merged Finnish-Swedish companies, and the second project investigated business and corporate communication as business know-how of internationally operating companies and organizations.  Currently Louhiala-Salminen is involved, for example, in a study examining ‘corporate language’ and communication of strategy in multinational enterprises operating in Europe.

While serving on the Advisory Board of the Center for Intercultural Dialogue, Louhiala-Salminen represented the Association for Business Communication (ABC). She is an ABC member since 1991 and has served the organization e.g. as member and chair of the Publications Board.  In 2011 she was elected member of the ABC Board (Director at Large).

Shiv Ganesh Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesShiv Ganesh (PhD, Purdue University, 2000), is  a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the Moody College of Communication at the University of Texas, Austin.

Shiv Ganesh

Shiv studies communication and collective organizing in the context of globalization and digital technologies. His work spans critical-institutional and poststructural approaches to communication, and is currently comprised of two strands; studies of technological transformations in collective action; and studies of dialogue, conflict and social change. His research is largely qualitative but has incorporated quantitative elements, and he has done fieldwork in a number of countries, including India, Aoteaora New Zealand, the United States, and Sweden.

Current projects include a study of advocacy and voice amongst indigenous people displaced by the creation of environmental reserves in India, as well as a large-scale survey of digital interaction and engagement dynamics amongst global networks of activists. His research has appeared in a number of journals including Communication MonographsCommunication TheoryHuman Relations, International Journal of Communication, Journal of Applied Communication ResearchManagement Communication QuarterlyMedia, Culture & Society, andOrganization Studies. 

Ganesh is a former editor-in-chief of the National Communication Association’s Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, and is on the editorial board of several other journals, including Communication TheoryInformation, Communication & SocietyJournal of CommunicationJournal of Applied Communication Research, Management Communication QuarterlyOrganization, and Women’s Studies in Communication. His research has won several awards from both the International Communication Association and the National Communication Association. Formerly, Ganesh served as Professor of Communication and Head of the School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing at Massey University in New Zealand.

Iris I. Varner Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesIris I. Varner is Professor Emeritus for International Business at Illinois State University where she was a professor and the Director of the International Business Institute.

Varner is a past President of the Association for Business Communication (ABC). She has won the ABC’s Outstanding Teaching Award and was named Fellow of ABC, and Distinguished Member of ABC. She received several departmental research and teaching awards. She is a native of Germany. She earned the Staatsexamen at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet in Freiburg, Germany. She received her Ph.D., an M.A. in German literature and an MBA from Oklahoma University.

Varner’s research interests focus on the interaction between business management, culture, and communication. Varner is co-author of the book, Intercultural Communication in the Global Workplace. Varner has done research on expatriation, cultural adjustments for successful expatriation, and criteria determining expatriate success. She has also examined the composition of corporate boards in Asia, Europe and North America, focusing on gender representation and international preparedness. Varner is an adjunct professor at the University of Lugano, Switzerland and a visiting professor at the University of Dresden, Germany. In addition, she has given lectures and seminars in New Zealand, Hong Kong, China, Japan, Belgium, France, Russia, and Poland. She serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Business Communication, and the Business Communication Quarterly.

Saskia Witteborn Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesSaskia Witteborn (PhD, University of Washington, 2005) is Associate Professor in the School of Journalism and Communication at Chinese University of Hong Kong where she also directs the M.A. program in Global Communication. She is Associate Editor of the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, past Chair of the Communication as Social Construction Division at NCA, and Research Associate of the University of Washington Center for Local Strategies Research (in affiliation with the United Nations Institute for Disarmament and Peace in Geneva).

Her research focuses on communicative practice and migration and how migrants create, adapt to, and enact ways of communicating and grouping in new sociocultural and political contexts (face-to-face and mediated). Moreover, her research explores how communication practices are constitutive of and constituted by transnational political, economic, and cultural processes and strategic interests. Saskia works mostly from an ethnographic and language and social interaction perspective and tries to understand how transnational migrants themselves perceive and create their sociopolitical and cultural realities. She has published on collective identity enactment by people with a migration background from Arab countries in the U.S., on social spaces, communication, and forced migration in Europe, on political advocacy by migrants from China in the U.S. and Germany as well as on Global Citizenship and Intercultural Dialogue in such journals as the Journal of Communication, Research on Language and Social Interaction, the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, and Language and Intercultural Communication. A chapter on political advocacy and gender is published in Circuits of Visibility: Gender and Transnational Media Cultures (Ed., R. Hegde, NYU Press) and a chapter on forced migrants and new media practices is forthcoming in the Handbook of Global Media Research (Ed., I. Volkmer, Routledge).

Go to her website for further information and contact details.

William Evans Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesWilliam Evans, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Telecommunication and Film at the University of Alabama. His research interests include content analysis, media audience measurement, and health and science communication.

He currently serves on the editorial board of Science Communication (a peer-reviewed journal). He has been principal investigator, senior personnel, or lead contractor for dozens of sizable grants and contracts, mostly related to the role of media in public health and in community emergence preparedness. As Director of the Institute for Communication and Information Research at the University of Alabama, a position he held from 2004 to 2010, Dr. Evans served as college-wide research administrator, identifying grant opportunities, preparing grant applications, and monitoring research ethics compliance for a faculty of more than 40 tenured and tenure-track professors. Dr. Evans is a member of the Broadcast Education Association (BEA) and has participated in eight of the ten most recent BEA annual meetings.

Stephen A. King Researcher Profile

Researcher ProfilesStephen A. King earned his Ph.D. in Speech Communication at Indiana University in 1997 and currently is Professor and Chair of Communication at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

King’s research program includes a long-term interest in rhetoric, intercultural communication and popular culture. His first book, Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Control, was published by the University Press of Mississippi in December 2002. King traces how Jamaica’s popular music evolved both lyrically and musically from 1959-1980. The study also examines how the Jamaican government and its surrogates attempted to control Jamaica’s popular music and the Rastafarian movement. King’s second book, I’m Feeling the Blues Right Now: Blues Tourism and the Mississippi Delta, was published by the University Press of Mississippi in July 2011. Promotional efforts to market blues music rely heavily on blues myths and claims of authenticity, strategies that seek to satisfy the imaginations of blues tourists who travel to the Mississippi Delta to experience authenticity (and spend money) in the mythical “birthplace of the blues.” At the same time, efforts to obfuscate Mississippi’s past embody conscious efforts to privilege a sterilized historical narrative, a narrative that relies heavily on revisionist memory practices. For example, while promotional materials often highlight the Delta as the “home of the blues,” and spotlight the region’s rustic and “authentic” blues culture, there is, not surprisingly, precious little information on Mississippi’s depressing record of state-sponsored oppression of African Americans.

King’s work has also been published in a variety of journals, including Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, Southern Communication Journal, Howard Journal of Communications, Popular Music and Society, and Caribbean Studies as well as in edited books such as The Resisting Muse: Popular Music and Social Protest (London: Ashgate Press, 2006), Popular Music and Human Rights, Volume I (London: Ashgate Press, 2011), Social Controversy and Public Address in the 1960s and Early 1970s: The Rhetorical History of the United States (Vol. 9, East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2017) and The Honky Tonk on the Left: Progressive Thought in Country Music (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2018). King and co-author Roger D. Gatchet (West Chester University—Pennsylvania) are currently working on a public memory project that explores how Mississippi is promoting its civil rights history as part of the state’s cultural heritage.